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  2. Who Is Dzulkarnain In Al Qur'aan Al A'zhiim ?
  3. Yesterday
  4. As-Salaam alaikum, In Ayat 6 of Surat Fussilat of the Holy Qur'an (41:6), Allahu Subhanahu Wa Ta'ala says:-- "SAY (O Muhammad) : I AM BUT A MAN LIKE YOU, WHO IS DIVINELY INSPIRED THAT YOUR god IS BUT ONE GOD." The catchy phrase in this verse (ayat) shows us that the Noble Prophet Muhammad, Sallallahu alaihi Wasallam, was a completely different sort of human being from anyone else, then and now. For none of us can say he is Divinely inspired as the Messenger was. Rather, as Sayyadi Busari, may Allah be Merciful to him, said in his Qasida al-Burda (Ode of the Prophetic Mantle):-- Muhammad is a human being, but not like humankind; He sis a ruby, while ordinary people are as stones. Just as a piece of iron when exposed and immersed in tremendous heat of fire annihilates its own identity and become lost in the colour and quality of fire, similarly the Messenger, Sallallahu alaihi Wasallam, in the Fire of Divine Love lost his own self- hood and attained to his highest degree of Khilafat or ambassador; and thus through him the attributes of Allah were made manifest. Thus his seeing, hearing, speaking and doing is that of the Divine's. That is why Allah say about the Prophet:-- "O My Beloved Prophet, you did not slay them, but Allah slayed them; and in no way did you throw when you threw, but Allah threw." (8:17) "The Prophet doesn't speak out of own volition, his speech is the speech of Allah." (53:3) "Truly, the ones who give bayah (allegiance) to you, in reality give bayah only to Allah; The Hand of Allah is above their hands." (48:10) From these verses, we can clearly see that through Prophet Muhammad, Sallallahu alaihi Wasallam, the beautiful Names (asma) and Attributes (sifat) were manifested fully, that is why following him is made equivalent of following Allah Ta'ala. Thus the Qur'an declares: "He who obeys the Messenger has obeyed Allah." (4:80) ALLAHUMMA SALLI ALAA SAYYADINA MUHAMMAD...AN-NABIYY UMMIYY, WA-ALAA AHLIHI, WA-ASHABIHI WA-SALAM, TASLIMAN-KASIRAA ABADAA.
  5. Last week
  6. Love In Islam

    The first type of love that Islam calls for is the Love of Allah, praise be to Him. This love makes you avoid committing sins in order not to make whom you love, Allah, get angry with you. This love also urges you to contemplate all the different aspect of nature that usually lead you to have a deeper faith in the Creator who created all this beauty round us.
  7. The message of an Egyptian girl to the heart of King Salman .. Free my father Alwaleed bin Talal. Prince Alwaleed bin Talal may not remember me, but I will never forget him How can a girl forget her father? Yes, Walid bin Talal is my father who did not have me, and I am his daughter who did not have her But this is a story deserves to be told I am a 16 year old Egyptian girl .. A student in the first grade secondary. I decided about a year ago to make an appeal to Prince Alwaleed bin Talal to invite him to save my father from death .. My father was suffering from severe pain due to leg ulcers .. He was crying and crying because of those pains day and night . And because of my father is the teacher who in the worst cases of poverty .. And because I knew that only Prince Alwaleed will save him after what I read about his nobility and humanity, I decided to correspond to Saudi newspapers in the hope of spreading my appeal to his sovereignty .. But the problem was that the publication of such a call requires So I and my brothers decided to work together to try and save money for a newspaper to accept the publication of the appeal .. I thought with my brothers (I was 15 years old at this time. My younger brother was 13 years old. And my young sister was 6 years) .. And decided to sell the earring of my younger sister .. And that I and my brother Ahmed strive to be each of us first to pay for It is a gift from the governor to the first to give them each laptop .. Then we sell the two devices in addition to the price of the earring to pay the cost of publishing the ad. And then i sent a letter to the Kuwaiti journalist, Mr. Hadi bin Ayed explained to him the matter .. The Minister of the spread of the content of the message volunteer and appealed to Prince Alwaleed to save my father.. It was not a day to publish the article so surprised my father contact from the Foundation Alwaleed bin Talal, specifically from Professor Mohamed Ibrahim Al – Eissa said that Prince Alwaleed was personally sympathetic with him and that he had been charged with solving the problem. Mr. Al-Eissa continued to telephone with my father for several days until he ended up donating a sum of money that they transferred to my father. Although I did not have the opportunity to communicate with Professor Mohammed Ibrahim Al-Essa personally, I kept looking forward to communicating with him to announce my deep desire and hope that I would meet with Prince Alwaleed bin Talal to thank him first for what he did for my parents.I wanted to ask him that Help my father to move and relieve him of torment because he is near and unable to move, and call us to perform us make Umrah. So I was surprised by the news that is bleading my heart and spent my hope and killed many things inside me: Prince Alwaleed bin Talal was arrested !! I do not know anything about politics.But I can not imagine that King Salman could wrong anyone. My little mind refuses to believe that Walid bin Talal .. the noble knight. .. and the father who has mercy on the finest examples of nobility and humanity .. There is now under house arrest. It is impossible to imprison humanity, and mercy can not be restricted, or mercy, kindness and good heart are placed in prison. Please .. released Walid bin Talal Release my father Your little lover daughter Nour Egypt Notes 1 - I do not have earing or any thing else to sell it to pay the cost of publishing the appeal this time .. I hoped that I have now any thing I can I sell it to be able to spread the appeal .. But all I have is my little heart owned by my father under house arrest .. On him .. And my pen, who missed these words .. Are these sufficient elements to publish my appeal? 2 - The message was translated by Google Translation site .. And forgive me for any errors in the translation.
  8. Earlier
  9. Islam in Australia (G'Day mates)

    Why Australian prisoners are reverting to Islam ? Academics, imams and prison workers widely agree that conversions to Islam are now commonplace in Australia’s prisons. Robbie Maestracci, a community outreach worker with the Islamic Council of Queensland, pays weekly visits to Muslim inmates in the greater Brisbane area. He believes there is a prominent trend of conversions to Islam among detainees. “Without a doubt there is … We’re constantly being made aware of new names of people who have embraced Islam or names of people who are wanting to embrace Islam. At least every two weeks, there’s another name or two being added to our list,” Maestracci says. Michael Kennedy, a veteran detective of 20 years, knows more than most about the subject. Since leaving the New South Wales organised crime squad he has studied Islam and incarceration extensively as an academic at the University of Western Sydney. Kennedy has maintained contact with a “lot of good crooks” met in his former life. They exchange letters now and again. His correspondents drift in and out of jail, giving him a unique insight into the place of religion in prison. “They’re pretty easy to talk to. One in particular I’m thinking of, I said [name removed], ‘did you get religious?’” “He said ‘Oh no, but a lot of people do, it’s the way you get by. It’s the way you’re able to deal with what’s happened to you.’ “You’re isolated from all the people that you know in your life, whether good people or bad. You need to connect with someone about something.” In this reading, the discovery of religion is essentially a coping mechanism, and a way to forge a shared identity in the dog-eat-dog world of prison. Kennedy says more often than not it’s a positive influence, which can open a pathway to rehabilitation. It gives inmates some semblance of structure and provides a motive to stay away from drugs and alcohol. “I actually don’t think it’s a bad [coping mechanism], but some would argue that it is,” he said. “If you think about it, from my point of view, it gives them a bit of hope.” The best publicly available information comes from a 2013 census of NSW prisoners, which suggests Muslims remain a minority, although one that is overrepresented. The census showed Muslims accounted for about 9.3% of the state’s prison population compared with 3.2% of the NSW population. Muslim inmates pray in the yard at Goulburn correctional centre where the prisons boss admits the Supermax facility is a hotbed of Islam. Picture: Sean DaveySource:News Corp Australia “Inmates suspected of, or identified as, holding radical views are closely monitored by experienced and well trained staff, and moved away from other inmates if necessary.” But Jones believes there are risks in segregating already radicalised offenders from the general prison population, an approach not adopted in Victoria, where they are dispersed. A spokeswoman for Corrections Victoria said it disperses prisoners “wherever practicable” and “according to their assessed level of risk and individual needs”. “This approach aims to prevent extremist views being continually reinforced by like-minded prisoners,” she said. Ali Kadri, the vice-president of the Islamic Council of Queensland, believes there is no real evidence suggesting prisoners are becoming radicalised. He believes, ultimately, religious conversions are a force for good. “Not just that, we find people who have always been socially isolated and are living a life in crime finding faith in prison and feeling apart of a community, so they have more motivation to behave than they did before,” Kadri says. “We believe that faith, not just Islam, has the potential to help people who are in that situation, to find the right path.” https://islamicnafahat.wordpress.com/2018/01/05/why-australian-prisoners-are-reverting-to-islam/
  10. Islam is a religion which gives guidance for matters pertaining to all walks of life. Mainly the Holy Quran, Ahadith and ijtihad are the sources through which Muslims derive laws that regulate and govern both private and social life. These laws give guidance with respect to worship, prohibitions, and all contracts and obligations related to social affairs such as inheritance, marriage, divorce, conduct of war and the general administration of the state. In Islam the science of religious laws is called Fiqah and the expert in this field of law is called a faqih. Based on these faqih are derived the different schools of thought in Islam. These are as follows. · Hanafi This school of thought was headed by Imam Abu Hanifa who was born in 80H and died in 150H in Baghdad. Imam Abu Hanifa was the greatest theologian and religious lawyer of his time. His approach towards religious affairs was very consistent; he focused a lot of reasoning and avoided extremes. · Maliki Led by Imam Malik bin Anas, who lived from 93H to 179H this school of thought is more dependent on Ahadith of the Holy Prophet compiled through his companions. Imam Malik served as a judge in the city of Madinah. His decisions are compiled in the form of a book called al-Muwatta. · Shaafi Imam al-Shafi led this school of thought. He was a disciple of Imam Malik. He lived from 150H to 198H. Just like his teacher, he laid great stress on the Ahadith for the solution of any issue. He was a great philosopher and thinker. He had an unusual grip over Islamic laws and principles, hence had an exceptional understanding of judicial issues. · Hanbali This fiqah was headed by Imam Ahamd Ibn Hanbal. He lived from 164H to 241H in Baghdad. This school of thought is considered to be the most rigid and inflexible. The idea behind this school of thought is to follow the Quran and Sunnah on the basis of literal injunctions. Followers of this school of thought generally are very strict with respect to the observance of religious obligations. · Jafri This school of thought was led by Imam Jafar ibn Mohammad al-Sadiq. He lived from 83H to 148H in Madina. The collection of his teachings is called usul. All his teachings were compiled by his followers in 400 usul. They have been compiled by gathering knowledge from ahadith, Islamic philosophy, literature, ethics and Quranic sources. These are the different schools of thought in Islam that govern the Islamic way of life.
  11. What Is Islam?

    Islam is a natural way of life that encourages one to give due attention to their relationship with God and His creation. Islam teaches that it is through the doing of good deeds and seeking the pleasure of God that souls find true happiness and peace. It is in this context that the word Islam derives from the root word “salam,” or peace.
  12. Ya Nabi Salam

    https://www.dawateislami.net/medialibrary/?mt=7
  13. Watch These Videos

    https://www.dawateislami.net/medialibrary/
  14. The 99 Beautiful Names Of Allah

    Allah, the creator of the universe and master of the two worlds, has revealed 99 names of His majestic supreme in the much revered holy book of the Muslims, the Quran. Each name embodies in itself the qualities and Abilities of our Creator and we seek forgiveness of our sins and misdeeds by reciting the suitable name of Allah. We also read these names to thank Allah for thanking in utmost humility for the countless blessings He continues to shower on us every second of the day. Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said: 'To God belongs 99 names, 100 minus 1, anyone who memorizes them will enter Paradise; He (God) is odd (odd number, he is the Only One), and He loves odd numbers.
  15. Miracles Of The Quran

    To every Prophet, Allah gave some miracles, but gone are the Prophets and their miracles. The Holy Prophet Muhammad (S) is the last prophet and Allah gave him a timeless miracle, and that miracle is the Holy Qur’an.
  16. Praise be to Allah, the Lord of the Worlds; and may His blessings and peace be upon our Prophet Muhammad and upon all his Family and Companions. Bralwiya is a Sufi sect which was founded in the town of Barili, in the Uttar Pradesh state in India during British colonialism. This sect is famous for exceeding the proper bounds of Prophets and Awliya (pious people). They launched "Madani channel". It's a group, which is distinct from the majority of Muslims in some points of belief (‘aqaid) and innovated practices (al-a’mal al-mubtada’ah). Ahmad Ridha Khan bin Taqi Ali Khan founded this sect in 1272 A.H; he died in 1340 A.H. He named himself Abdul Mustapha. The person who gave him this name (Abdul Mustapha) committed a very serious offence because worship should not be dedicated except to Allah. Their false ideologies: 1) The Prophet is an absolute assistant to Allah, and that the whole world is under his control, he runs it as he wishes, gives whatever he wants to whomever he wants, and takes away what he wants from whomever he wants. His order is irrefutable and no one can review or comment on his judgement. They say: 'whoever does not make the Prophet the Owner of all the things is deprived from the sweetness of the Sunnah.' 2) The Awliya (pious people) after the Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam) have the power to run this world. 3) They have indeed exaggerated in their view about the Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam) until they raised him to the status of Lordship. Ahmed Ridha Khan wrote in Hadaiq Bakhshish (the gardens of grants): 'O, Muhammad (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam), I cannot call you Allah, but I cannot distinguish between you both. Your matter is in the hands of Allah, He is the One who is best aware about your reality.' 4) They believe that the Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam) is present and sees the actions of all the creation at all times and everywhere. They deny him being a human being; they consider him as a light of the lights of Allah. 5) They urge their followers to call upon the Prophets and Walis (pious people) for help, and whoever denies this, they label him as apostate. 6) They say that Sadaqah should be paid on a dead person according to the number of Salah and Sawm (fasting) that he had missed in his life. The amount of Sadaqah that should be paid on every Salah and fasting is the same as that of Sadaqah Al-Fitr. Whoever holds the false beliefs of this group has not been guided to the Truth. Therefore, it is not permissible for a Muslim to follow them or join them. But rather, it would be incumbent on him to advise them and warn others about their wrong belief. Therefore, he should continue to implore his Lord day and night, especially since ‘Aa’ishah may Allaah be pleased with her narrated that the Prophet , used to commence the night prayer saying: “Allaahumma: O Allaah, Lord of Jibreel (Gabriel), Mikaa’eel (Michael) and Israafeel (Israfil); Creator of the heavens and the earth, Knower of the unseen and the seen. You judge between Your slaves concerning that about which they differ. O Allaah, guide me to the matters of truth about which they differ by your permission, for You are the One Who guides to the straight path)." [Muslim] Allah knows best.
  17. Dr Tauseef Ahmad Parray From the classical to the contemporary era, numerous biographical works have been written on the life (seerah) of the last Prophet (SAW)—the only personage whose every detail, aspect, and feature, of whose blessed and illustrious life is thoroughly known to the world. Among these, a good number have been written, especially in the modern period, by Western (Muslim and non-Muslims alike) scholars in English. A good deal of this scholarship—related to the life, reforms, and achievements—is also produced in the form of the books on Islamic history. Here, in this write-up, views of some of the Muslims scholars, through their books on Islamic history—viz. Syed Ameer Ali, Masudul Hasan, Sayyed Hossein Nasr, and Akbar S. Ahmed—are presented to get a glimpse of how they perceive and present the achievements of the Prophet (SAW) as a Prophet vis-à-vis reformer. Prophet Muhammad (SAW) “came to humankind”, as Professor Tariq Ramadan writes in his ‘In The Footsteps of the Prophet: Lessons from the Life of Muhammad’/ The Messenger (2007, p. 214) “with a message of faith, ethics, and hope, in which the One reminds all people of His presence, His requirements, and the final Day of Return and Encounter”. He touched every aspect of human life: he was a savior, liberator, and protector of the ‘oppressed’ humanity. Benefactor of humanity, Prophet (SAW was the greatest reformer the world has ever produced. He made great reforms in the socio-religious and politico-economic spheres. In the modern times, Prophet (SAW) is presented as a ‘reformer’ who considerably raised the social and ethical level of the Arabs of his time. The Prophet (SAW) was not only a religious preacher, a soldier, a statesman, but also a great administrator as well. He presided over, after hijrah from Makkah to Medina in 622 CE, the Commonwealth of Islam for ten years (622-32CE); and, thus, in the words of Syed Ameer Ali (d. 1928; Indian Jurist, political leader and author of numerous books on Islamic history) in his A Short History of the Saracens (2011, pp. 19 & 55): “During the ten years [Prophet] Mohammad [SAW] presided over the commonwealth of Islam [622-32 CE], a great change had come over the character of the Arab people”. And, in this short span of ten years at Medina, Ameer Ali adds, “a congeries of warring tribes and clans were rapidly consolidated into a nation under the influence of one great Idea. The work done within that short period will always remain as one of the most wonderful achievements recorded in history”. Writing on the achievements of Prophet (SAW), Professor Masudul Hasan (Pakistani historian), in his “History of Islam” (2015; vol. 1, pp. 76-77) writes: “the Holy Prophet [SAW] built an Ummah out of the people never united before; established a religion that elevated the soul; created an egalitarian society; laid the basis of an empire and set up new ideals before mankind. … He liberated man by planning for him a new political, economic, and social order, free from exploitation”. “In the wider perspective of universal history”, Professor Hasan avers, “we discern in the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] the greatest man the world has ever produced. As regards all standards, …, He (SAW)] is the greatest man of all times. … Of all men, the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] has exercised greatest influence upon the human race, and he stands to this day, and for all times to come, at the peak of humanity” (p. 77). Professor Sayyed Hossein Nasr (George Washington University, USA), in his “Islam: Religion, History, Civilization” (2002: 5), is of the opinion that the “primordial character of the Islamic message”, which was brought by the last Prophet (SAW), “is reflected not only in its essentiality, universality, and simplicity, but also in its inclusive attitude toward the religions and forms of wisdom that preceded it”. Writing on ‘The Prophet [SAW]: His Significance, Life, and Deeds’ (pp. 46-47), Prof. Nasr puts forth very eloquently that “The Prophet [SAW] is seen by Muslims as the most perfect of all of God’s creatures, the perfect man par excellence (al-Insan al-Kamil) and the beloved of God (Habib Allah), whom the Quran calls an excellent model (Uswah Hasanah) to emulate. He represents perfect surrender to God combined with proximity (qurb) to Him, which makes him the best interpreter of God’s message as well as its most faithful transmitter”. On the Prophet’s (SAW) achievements and contributions in the Medinan phase, Professor Nasr holds that in Medina, “the Prophet [SAW] became the ruler of a community; was at once statesman, judge, and military leader as well as the Prophet of God” (pp. 50-51). Thus, he accepts, like others, that in a short span of twenty-three-year period (as Prophet), “the Prophet [SAW] succeeded in not only uniting Arabia under the banner of Islam, but also establishing a religious community of global extent, for which he remains always the ideal model of human behaviour and action” (p. 52). He further states that “When we think of the life of the Prophet [SAW] in its totality, we must not only think of him as the leader of a human community, a father and head of a family, a man who married several wives, or a ruler who participated in battles or made social and political decisions for the preservation of Islam. We must also meditate on his inner life of prayer, vigil, and fasting and especially the mi‘raj [The Ascension], … create[ing] a balance between the outward and the inward, the physical and the spiritual” (p. 53). In his “The Heart of Islam” (2004), Professor Nasr enunciates almost similar views, and describes the significance of Prophet (SAW) as essential in order to “understand the heart of Islam” (p. 28). Along similar lines, the Pakistani-American professor, Akbar S Ahmed (American University, Washington, USA) in his “Discovering Islam: Making Sense of Muslim History and Society” (2002) puts forward these insights: “Equality, the status of women, the rights of the less privileged (minorities, poorer working groups)—the shibboleths of our age—were reflected in the Prophet’s [SAW] message. It was a revolution the Prophet [SAW] wished to bring about, to end what came to be known as the Jahiliyya, the dark age” (p. 19). “In a short span” of 23 years as Prophet (SAW), he continues, “he [SAW] had played the role of father, husband, chief, warrior, friend and Prophet. His respect for learning, tolerance of others, generosity of spirit, concern for the weak, gentle piety and desire for a better, cleaner, world would constitute the main elements of the Muslim ideal. For Muslims , the life of the Prophet (SAW) is the triumph of hope over despair, [and of] light over darkness” (p. 21). Thus, we see that although Prophet (SAW) had, and displayed, in abundance, the qualities of “Piety, forbearance, courage and judgment—required in some degree by any leader”, but “what is striking about his behaviour and temperament is the most unexpected quality in tribal life, gentleness” (p. 22). The Prophet’s (SAW) “years of tribulation were brief; success followed in abundance. Within his lifetime he had established a religion and a state. … One hundred years after his death the Islamic empire was greater than Rome at its zenith” (pp. 28-29). These glimpses clearly show the greatness of ‘the greatest man of all times’. It is in the Prophet’s (SAW) illustrious life, that we see absolutely everything was ‘an instrument of renewal and transformation’ from the slightest detail to the greatest events; and all those (be they Muslims or believers of any faith) who study and write on Prophet’s (SAW) life, regardless of their personal religious belief, can derive instruction from this, thus reaching toward the essence of the message of light of faith. To use again, and to end with, the terminology of Tariq Ramadan, the Prophet (SAW) “prayed, meditated, transformed himself, and transformed the world. … He was beloved by God and an example among humans. He prayed and he contemplated. He loved, he gave. He served, he transformed. The Prophet [SAW] was the light that leads to Light, and in learning from his life, believers return to the Source of Life and find His light, His warmth, and His love” (pp. 214-216). —The author is Assistant Professor, Islamic Studies, at GDC, Pulwama. https://kashmirreader.com/2017/12/21/prophet-muhammad-saw-in-the-eyes-of-muslim-historians-some-perspectives/
  18. Dr Tauseef Ahmad Parray From the classical to the contemporary era, numerous biographical works have been written on the life (seerah) of the last Prophet (SAW)—the only personage whose every detail, aspect, and feature, of whose blessed and illustrious life is thoroughly known to the world. Among these, a good number have been written, especially in the modern period, by Western (Muslim and non-Muslims alike) scholars in English. A good deal of this scholarship—related to the life, reforms, and achievements—is also produced in the form of the books on Islamic history. Here, in this write-up, views of some of the Muslims scholars, through their books on Islamic history—viz. Syed Ameer Ali, Masudul Hasan, Sayyed Hossein Nasr, and Akbar S. Ahmed—are presented to get a glimpse of how they perceive and present the achievements of the Prophet (SAW) as a Prophet vis-à-vis reformer. Prophet Muhammad (SAW) “came to humankind”, as Professor Tariq Ramadan writes in his ‘In The Footsteps of the Prophet: Lessons from the Life of Muhammad’/ The Messenger (2007, p. 214) “with a message of faith, ethics, and hope, in which the One reminds all people of His presence, His requirements, and the final Day of Return and Encounter”. He touched every aspect of human life: he was a savior, liberator, and protector of the ‘oppressed’ humanity. Benefactor of humanity, Prophet (SAW was the greatest reformer the world has ever produced. He made great reforms in the socio-religious and politico-economic spheres. In the modern times, Prophet (SAW) is presented as a ‘reformer’ who considerably raised the social and ethical level of the Arabs of his time. The Prophet (SAW) was not only a religious preacher, a soldier, a statesman, but also a great administrator as well. He presided over, after hijrah from Makkah to Medina in 622 CE, the Commonwealth of Islam for ten years (622-32CE); and, thus, in the words of Syed Ameer Ali (d. 1928; Indian Jurist, political leader and author of numerous books on Islamic history) in his A Short History of the Saracens (2011, pp. 19 & 55): “During the ten years [Prophet] Mohammad [SAW] presided over the commonwealth of Islam [622-32 CE], a great change had come over the character of the Arab people”. And, in this short span of ten years at Medina, Ameer Ali adds, “a congeries of warring tribes and clans were rapidly consolidated into a nation under the influence of one great Idea. The work done within that short period will always remain as one of the most wonderful achievements recorded in history”. Writing on the achievements of Prophet (SAW), Professor Masudul Hasan (Pakistani historian), in his “History of Islam” (2015; vol. 1, pp. 76-77) writes: “the Holy Prophet [SAW] built an Ummah out of the people never united before; established a religion that elevated the soul; created an egalitarian society; laid the basis of an empire and set up new ideals before mankind. … He liberated man by planning for him a new political, economic, and social order, free from exploitation”. “In the wider perspective of universal history”, Professor Hasan avers, “we discern in the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] the greatest man the world has ever produced. As regards all standards, …, He (SAW)] is the greatest man of all times. … Of all men, the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] has exercised greatest influence upon the human race, and he stands to this day, and for all times to come, at the peak of humanity” (p. 77). Professor Sayyed Hossein Nasr (George Washington University, USA), in his “Islam: Religion, History, Civilization” (2002: 5), is of the opinion that the “primordial character of the Islamic message”, which was brought by the last Prophet (SAW), “is reflected not only in its essentiality, universality, and simplicity, but also in its inclusive attitude toward the religions and forms of wisdom that preceded it”. Writing on ‘The Prophet [SAW]: His Significance, Life, and Deeds’ (pp. 46-47), Prof. Nasr puts forth very eloquently that “The Prophet [SAW] is seen by Muslims as the most perfect of all of God’s creatures, the perfect man par excellence (al-Insan al-Kamil) and the beloved of God (Habib Allah), whom the Quran calls an excellent model (Uswah Hasanah) to emulate. He represents perfect surrender to God combined with proximity (qurb) to Him, which makes him the best interpreter of God’s message as well as its most faithful transmitter”. On the Prophet’s (SAW) achievements and contributions in the Medinan phase, Professor Nasr holds that in Medina, “the Prophet [SAW] became the ruler of a community; was at once statesman, judge, and military leader as well as the Prophet of God” (pp. 50-51). Thus, he accepts, like others, that in a short span of twenty-three-year period (as Prophet), “the Prophet [SAW] succeeded in not only uniting Arabia under the banner of Islam, but also establishing a religious community of global extent, for which he remains always the ideal model of human behaviour and action” (p. 52). He further states that “When we think of the life of the Prophet [SAW] in its totality, we must not only think of him as the leader of a human community, a father and head of a family, a man who married several wives, or a ruler who participated in battles or made social and political decisions for the preservation of Islam. We must also meditate on his inner life of prayer, vigil, and fasting and especially the mi‘raj [The Ascension], … create[ing] a balance between the outward and the inward, the physical and the spiritual” (p. 53). In his “The Heart of Islam” (2004), Professor Nasr enunciates almost similar views, and describes the significance of Prophet (SAW) as essential in order to “understand the heart of Islam” (p. 28). Along similar lines, the Pakistani-American professor, Akbar S Ahmed (American University, Washington, USA) in his “Discovering Islam: Making Sense of Muslim History and Society” (2002) puts forward these insights: “Equality, the status of women, the rights of the less privileged (minorities, poorer working groups)—the shibboleths of our age—were reflected in the Prophet’s [SAW] message. It was a revolution the Prophet [SAW] wished to bring about, to end what came to be known as the Jahiliyya, the dark age” (p. 19). “In a short span” of 23 years as Prophet (SAW), he continues, “he [SAW] had played the role of father, husband, chief, warrior, friend and Prophet. His respect for learning, tolerance of others, generosity of spirit, concern for the weak, gentle piety and desire for a better, cleaner, world would constitute the main elements of the Muslim ideal. For Muslims , the life of the Prophet (SAW) is the triumph of hope over despair, [and of] light over darkness” (p. 21). Thus, we see that although Prophet (SAW) had, and displayed, in abundance, the qualities of “Piety, forbearance, courage and judgment—required in some degree by any leader”, but “what is striking about his behaviour and temperament is the most unexpected quality in tribal life, gentleness” (p. 22). The Prophet’s (SAW) “years of tribulation were brief; success followed in abundance. Within his lifetime he had established a religion and a state. … One hundred years after his death the Islamic empire was greater than Rome at its zenith” (pp. 28-29). These glimpses clearly show the greatness of ‘the greatest man of all times’. It is in the Prophet’s (SAW) illustrious life, that we see absolutely everything was ‘an instrument of renewal and transformation’ from the slightest detail to the greatest events; and all those (be they Muslims or believers of any faith) who study and write on Prophet’s (SAW) life, regardless of their personal religious belief, can derive instruction from this, thus reaching toward the essence of the message of light of faith. To use again, and to end with, the terminology of Tariq Ramadan, the Prophet (SAW) “prayed, meditated, transformed himself, and transformed the world. … He was beloved by God and an example among humans. He prayed and he contemplated. He loved, he gave. He served, he transformed. The Prophet [SAW] was the light that leads to Light, and in learning from his life, believers return to the Source of Life and find His light, His warmth, and His love” (pp. 214-216). —The author is Assistant Professor, Islamic Studies, at GDC, Pulwama. https://kashmirreader.com/2017/12/21/prophet-muhammad-saw-in-the-eyes-of-muslim-historians-some-perspectives/
  19. My sister is drinking alcohol and hugging men

    Wa alaikum assalam Islam instilled family values and gave security to the people. Thus, with Islam, there is no longer a "need" to drink in order to relieve unhappiness and stress by slipping into a fantasy world. Give here advice/nasiha privately. The fear of God helps Muslims keep away from not only alcohol, but all other evils prohibited by the Qur'an, such as adultery, abuse and gambling. Peer pressure (sistererhood) also helps Muslims abstain from these sins. Islam is very clear on the topic of extra-marital affairs, and considers it as one of the major sins. It is important to note in this instance that Islamic teachings are often preventive in nature so “chances” that a person may become vulnerable to the temptation of one sin or another are excluded. In The Qur’an in (Surah 17, al Isra,, verse 32), Allah says: Do not go near adultery, .surely it is an indecency, and an evil way [of fulfilling sexual urge]. (17:32) Please note that extra-marital affairs may not involve any sex. It could be an emotional affair via the internet, and that may itself be equally problematic and dangerous. Have a look here: https://www.quranandscience.com/featured-articles/341-alcohol-in-islam http://aboutislam.net/shariah/shariah-and-humanity/shariah-and-life/premarital-relationships-why-not-2/
  20. Assalamu' Alaykum Muslim brothers and sisters. My sister and I live with my mother in Kuwait, I started university 2 years ago and when I came home this year during summer break in July I found that my sister had been talking to a boy on Instagram who was sending her heart shapes and inappropriate material via her private chat. I confronted my sister about it and she told me that he was just a friend from school and that I didn't need to worry about him, she begged me not to tell our mother and I said I'll think about it. I, of course, had to tell my mother about it, later on in the day, but made her promise beforehand not to do anything irrational before I got to the bottom of it and she left the matter in my hands. I told my sister the day after to stop talking to the boy at once and to un-follow and block him, she agreed to the former part not talking to him but she didn't want to un-follow him because he was her friend and he would probably be sad if she did, and so out of compassion I let her. Two months later in September, she started her university education in Canada, when I went to her university once I asked for her password so I can have access to the internet and so she sent it to me. Today (December) I was scrolling through Facebook and found that she'd made an account even though she always said she despised Facebook, I went through her friends list and found that the boy whom I told her to stop talking to had become friends with her, I scrolled through her page even further and found that it's only been 2 months since she made her Facebook. The thought occurred to me that she didn't hold her end of the bargain and so I decided to try her e-mail and password combination on Facebook and it worked. I went through her messages and found that she was still talking to the boy, not only that, but she once texted one of her boy friends that she met in college: "If you meet my brother please don't tell him that I drink and hug boys because he's gonna kill me if he finds out." Please I need help, I want to tell my mother but I don't want to ruin her education or our relationship. Me and my sister are practically best friends so if I do this she will probably detest me for the rest of her life. Thank you for reading,,,
  21. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    There are certain action points we can achieve in both the short term and long term. They are as follows: Short term 1. What has happened and what this means for Jerusalem, Palestine, and the Muslim world. The formal Judaisation of Jerusalem and ‘legalising’ the change of the status quo of Masjid al-Aqsa. This will lead to granting Israelis full control over al-Aqsa and other religious places in the city. This poses a real threat to al-Aqsa. It might encourage other countries to follow the footsteps of the US. 2. The importance of Jerusalem from the Qur’ān and Sunnah and its relationship and link with al-Masjid al-Harām. 3. State the problem; that people have forgotten it and neglected it as a political problem or a nationalistic one. The current state of Palestine and the recent announcement as regards Jerusalem is a result of the weakness of the Muslim Ummah. 4. The inaction of the leaders puts the requirement on the lay to act; each Muslim according to their means. As we are told by the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam), “Whoever of you sees an evil must then change it with his hand. If he is not able to do so, then [he must change it ] with his tongue. And if he is not able to do so, then [he must change it] with his heart. And that is the weakest of īmān.”[2] There was no fourth option given to excuse the Muslims of inaction. Allāh (subḥānahu wa taʿālā) will not ask the average Muslim why they did not liberate Palestine or al-Aqsa but He will ask why they did not do what was in their capacity to raise awareness, apply pressure, and contribute to bring eventual change. 5. Offer advice as to what can be done by the layperson, and why. “And when a community among them said: “Why do you preach to a people whom Allāh is about to destroy or to punish with a severe torment?” (The preachers) said: “In order to be free from guilt before your Lord, and perhaps they may fear Allāh”.”[3] Allāh (subḥānahu wa taʿālā) looks at the input of each person and their personal moral responsibility, rather than outcome. https://www.islam21c.com/politics/al-quds-jerusalem-islamic-land-no-one-can-change-reality/
  22. Eye Make Up And Wudu

    Greetings everyone, For authentic Fatwa i have come across a website and i would you guys to visit and check out their great service which they are providing, for further details on Fatwa's you can visit: https://www.awqaf.gov.ae/en/Pages/officialfatwacenter.aspx
  23. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    Muslims are routinely accused of provoking conflicts with other peoples but the reality is clearly that they are only reacting to the provocation carried out by the likes of Trump and those before him. The real question is who is to blame? Palestine has been under occupation for over half a century and this announcement comes as no surprise to us, rather it is a reminder of the on-going occupation and loud call to the Ummah. The status of Al-Quds and Al-Aqsa are of the most critical issues of our time and a call for Muslims to wake up and stand up all over the world. This Ummah might have become weak yet it will never die, and now is the time we must urge one another to oppose this move with all the tools at our disposal. This illegal and bloody occupation has reached its zenith – and we must not let it succeed.
  24. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    Al-Quds, or Jerusalem, is an Islamic land All praise is to Allāh, and Salutations and prayers are upon the Messenger of Allāh (sall Allāhu ʿalayhī wa sallam) “Exalted is He who took His Servant by night from al-Masjid al-Haram to al-Masjid al- Aqsa, whose surroundings We have blessed, to show him of Our signs. Indeed, He is the Hearing, the Seeing.”[1] Historically the status of Al-Quds is the yardstick by which the Ummah’s strength is measured. When the Ummah was strong ʿUmar b. al-Khattāb opened it. When the Ummah became weak in the end of the 4th Hijri century it was occupied by the crusaders. When the Ummah became strong again Salāh al-Dīn al-Ayyūbī liberated it once again. And after the fall of the Ottoman Caliphate, it was occupied once again. And the Day of Judgement will not take place until the Ummah becomes strong again and liberates itself from occupation as the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) informed us. Al-Quds has always been the icon or reference point which exposes the reality of the relationship between the three faiths of Divine scriptures; Islam, Christianity and Judaism. And, as a result, all three faiths have always had interest in it and hence it is a place where major global conflicts will take place. Despite the emergence and violent imposition of secularism, the global status of Al-Quds is testament of the continuance and the presence of faith in people’s lives. https://www.islam21c.com/politics/al-quds-jerusalem-islamic-land-no-one-can-change-reality/
  25. Martydom and Ayat 154 Of Surat Baqra..

    As-Salaam alaikum, In Ayat 154 of Surat Baqra of the Holy Qur'an (2:154), we read it where Allah Ta'ala says:-- "And say not of those who are slain in the way of Allah: 'They are dead.' Nay, they are living, though you perceive it not." This Ayat is explained by/in Hadith (Abu Dawud, Kitab Jihad) wherein the Prophet, Sallallahu alaihi Wasallam, said: "When your brothers from Uhud were touched (by death), Allah placed their spirits in a green bird that drinks from the rivers of Paradise, eats its fruits and rests near golden candles hanging in the shadows of the Throne. When they saw that their food, drink and resting places were good, they said: 'Who will let our brothers know that we are alive in Paradise, and that we receive our subsistence, that they may not skimp in the struggle, and that they do not abdicate in the war?" Allah, Subhanahu Wa Ta'ala, said, "I will let them know." And above quoted Ayat 154 of Surat Baqra was then brought down: "And say not of those who are slain in the way of Allah...(2:154) In anycase if your rationale for life is that you eat and move around, they also eat. Whatever you/we eat of grain, fruit or meat, is a product of dust, you consume dust, while they consume Noor (Divine Light).
  26. Eminence Of Suratul-Fatiha.

    According to the Prophet, Sallallahu alaihi Wasallam, all that is contained in the revealed Books is summed up in the Surat Fatiha of the Holy Qur'an (The Opening One), while this is in its turn contained in the formula BISMILLAHI-R-RAHMANI-R-RAHIM (In the Name of Allah, the Compassionate, the Merciful). The Fatiha constitutes the chief text of the ritual prayer; as for the formula, commonly called the basmala, it is the Formula of consecration pronounced before every sacred recitation and every ritual act. According to another tradition, going back to Sayyadi Ali, may Allah be pleased with him, the basmala is in essence contained in its first letter, ba, and this again in its diacritical point, which thus symbolizes Principal Unity. In the basmala, the interpretation of the 2 Names ar-Rahman and ar-Rahim as "the Compassionate" and "the Merciful", is only approximate as there is no real equivalent. Both names imply the idea of Mercy (ar-Rahmah: ar-Rahman corresponds to the Mercy which- to use a Qur'anic expression- "embraces all things", and expresses the plenitude of Being, its essential Bliss and the universal nature of its effulgence; ar-Rahim corresponds to Grace. As Rahman, Allah manifests Himself through the appearance of the world; as Rahim He manifests divinely within the world.
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