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Fear Of Flying

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  1. What Type Of Charge Is This?

    If there are any "British" muslims that believe it is their religious duty to fight British troops in Iraq (i'm sure there are many), i urge them to follow their good book, and go. Their remaining family members should be air-dropped into Baghdad at the earliest convenient time (parachutes not included). We wouldn't want them missing out on the glory of Jihad!!
  2. Germany Opens Major Islam Conference

    That was the whole point! Your question was to show a link between Islam in europe and a rise in neo-nazism. Wether you agree with the reasoning of the neo-nazis or muslims is neither here nor there. The BNP give rise to neo-nazi sentiment not only in Britain, but across europe. They are currently doing so on an anti-Islam ticket, and doing so successfully. I've seen it with my own eyes. Therein lies the link. Now the points i made about your initial post about the conference and it's glaring contradictions and double-standards, will help feed anti-Islam feeling for those who already have an anti-islamic agenda, and will help in further recruitment. There seem to be two types of right-wing extreme groups in europe. There are those that hate Jews, and are willing to join hands with anybody that shares their sentiment. The other type is the anti-immigration groups. This group is more likely to have an anti-islamic agenda, although jew-bashing would not be off the menu by any means. Muslims in Europe provide plenty of ammunition for both.
  3. War Is Peace

    Orwell was a true prophet. It's heartbreaking to see people use his words to further their own political agendas. I doubt he would have been too fond of any political/social model in place today. The flawed democratic system of the US or the hateful theocracy of many a muslim country would both warrant a good hard slapdown from the great man.
  4. Praying On Planes?

    It seems he was merely pointing out that he feels uncomfortable sitting next to a muslim on a plane, especially an overtly religious muslim. He's far from alone in thinking this way, especially on a flight from London!!! Why is this reaction so suprising to you people?
  5. The Enemy Within Our Midst.

    Hello Eoin. Thank you for that well constructed and thoughtful response. Once again i find myself in partial agreement with many points you raised, yet completely at odds with others. Firstly, allow me to offer a standing ovation...if i were to post on this forum whilst under the influence of "Lambs" it would probably be my last post, and the stimulant for an addition to the forum rules. Rule 42, thou shalt not post whilst bladdered! Unfortunately i am in a state of complete sobriety, which i find is rarely conducive with the art of rational debate, but i'm willing to give it a shot. I am in no doubt that the majority of muslims in Britain are not terrorists, and i am also willing to believe that the majority do not harbour sympathetic tendencies towards 'islamic terrorists'. Where we do differ is on the aspect of the significant minority that do hold these opinions, and the minority within that demographic that is willing to act upon their violent desires. "To what degree is the British populations declining opinion of both Islam and Muslim's a result of the action or inaction of Muslim's in instigating or failing to prevent or condemn terrorist acts weighted comparatively to the overly zealous reporting of the British (predominantly tabloid) press." The answer to this is probably a bit of both (nice bit of fence sitting). If you were to ask about the reasoning for my declining opinion of muslims/Islam, i would firmly be in the former camp. However i'm sure there are many that are happy to form an opinion based upon a headline on the front cover of a newspaper which routinely utilises the practice of lazy journalism and walks the fine line between current affairs and cleavage. This is not to say that tabloid headlines are wrong or misleading by their very nature, but common sense tells us that a little further research may be necessary. Unlike yourself i do not feel that the "Daily Mail mob" make up the majority of those who's opinion of Islam/muslims has declined in recent years, These people would never have had a very high opinion of Islam/muslims before the current trend began. I certainly can't buy the notion that the reason for the lack of collective protest to the London bombings was due to a lack of central leadership or hierachy in the community. This has never been an issue when organising the countless protests for "muslim" issues that the muslim community have undertaken over the past few years. The only conclusion i can draw is that this lack of action was due to a lack of support and lack of desire. The reaction to 7/7 and other simliar events has generally been one of denial, veiled justification or the clambering to grasp onto victim status. Check out the reaction to the bombings on this forum. I believe it is on page 68 of the general section. You will see all these reactions in abundance. There is nothing wrong with quiet condemnation in ones own home/heart. There is generally no need for people to publically display their feelings, and it would be unfair to ask people to air their personal reflections through the national media. However the muslim community has shown itself to be anything but shy when airing their views on issues they find relevant, therefore i do not believe it to be wrong for the muslim community to tackle condemnation of acts of Islamic terrorism with the same vigour they display when "offended", or are these acts not offensive enough? You and i obviously have a difference of opinion with regards to some apsects of muslims in Britain, but as you rightly point out, it is not for me to tell you what to think. All i do ask of you is that you respect my right to hold an opinion. Understand that there are genuine grievances which need to be addressed. There seems to be a growing problem in western society, that those who waver from the acceptable party line and question the merits of an imposed status quo must be rejected forthwith as racists, bigots or extremists. The problem with that policy is that eventually people will not be ashamed of these labels, and even the acceptable restraints placed upon public discourse shall be lifted. As you say there, there must be a middle ground. However i find it quite alarming that you feel it is up to "The Daily Mail, et al" to bridge the gap. It is a newspaper, and like many other newspapers it has an agenda/political leaning which it holds in common with it's readership. It does not have any obligation other than to present the news as it sees fit. If you don't like it, don't buy it (like me), or if you find it offensive then contact the PCC. You seem to have about as much faith in the general British populace as i do in the "british" muslim community. I have a sudden urge to add one of those infernal emoticons, so here goes..... :D
  6. The True Face Of The Taliban

    (www.)"observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story/0,,1884833,00.html"]observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story...1884833,00.html[/url] Afghan girls risk their lives to go to secret school Arson, grenade attacks and Taliban threats have driven 200,000 children out of the classroom Pamela Constable in Mollai, Afghanistan Sunday October 1, 2006 The Observer In a small, sunlit room last week, 20 little girls seated on rush mats sketched a flower drawn on the blackboard. In a darker, interior room, 15 older girls recited passages from the Koran. Upstairs was a class of teenage girls, hidden from view. The location of the mud-walled home school is a close secret. The students include five girls who attended another home school that was burnt down three months ago. The very existence of these classes is a challenge to the insurgents who have attacked dozens of schools across Afghanistan in the past year, especially those teaching girls. 'We are scared. All the home schools are scared. If I even hear a dog bark, I don't open the gate. I go up on the roof to see who is there,' said Mohammed Sulieman, 49, who teaches in several villages in the Sheikhabad district of Wardak province. Children's education was once touted as a success in this new democracy. Within two years of the 2001 overthrow of the Taliban, who banned girls' education, officials boasted that 5.1 million children of both sexes were enrolled in state schools, including hundreds of village tent-schools erected by Unicef. Now that positive tide has come to a halt in several provinces where Taliban insurgents are battling Nato troops, and has slowed dramatically in many other regions. President Hamid Karzai said last week that some 200,000 Afghan children had been forced out of school this year by threats and violence. According to Unicef, 106 attacks or threats against schools occurred from January to August. They included one missile attack, 11 explosions, 50 arson attacks and 37 threats. In the four southern provinces under serious assault by Taliban forces, nearly half of the 748 schools have closed. Bernt Aasen, of Unicef, has warned that the attacks 'undermine the very fabric of the future of Afghan society'. In the southern province of Kandahar, all schools are closed in five districts. Attackers have hurled grenades into classrooms and threatened to throw acid on girl pupils. In Helmand province, a headteacher was beheaded, another teacher killed by gunmen on motorbikes, and six schools burnt down. Three districts have closed all schools. In the 1990s, civil conflict and religious repression hampered education. Many teachers fled the country. Families who could afford to do so educated their children abroad. In rural areas education became virtually inaccessible, especially for girls, and in some places female literacy fell to less than 1 per cent. State education remains controversial for girls, especially once they reach puberty and custom forbids them to mix with boys. In northern provinces, where the Taliban threat is minimal and customs more moderate, many communities have welcomed foreign offers to build schools for girls. One such community is in Parwan, a lush but impoverished province of rushing streams and terraced fields. This summer the US Army built an eight-room school for 300 girls in Mollai village, the first in the area. In one class every child is the first girl in her family to attend school. 'There are still a few parents who don't want their daughters to come, but we keep talking to them,' said the teacher, Mahmad Agul, 25. 'We lack everything here - paved roads, electrical power, deep wells, clinics. But this school was our highest priority.' Gul Khanum, 11, said that her parents were illiterate farmers, but she hoped to become a doctor. Nazia, 10, stood to recite a poem, speaking nervously but without a hitch. Afterwards, she said she had learnt to read at home but had not attended school before: 'Before, we were just sitting in the dust. Now we have desks and chairs and a roof.' In the remote northwest provinces, Save the Children has been working with officials to promote schooling for girls. 'Every kid in Afghanistan has been affected by conflict, but you still have to try and educate them. It can't just stop,' said Leslie Wilson of Save the Children. In Sar-e Pol province, she said, there are three times more girls in school than three years ago: 'It's a drop in the bucket, but it's progress.' Where schools are too distant or too dangerous to attend, hundreds of communities set up home schools. With the revival of the Taliban threat, they are becoming an important alternative. In the central province of Wardak, the main road was crowded last week with boys on bicycles travelling to high school. But not even they are safe from attack. In one village, the only boys' school was bombed six months ago and some students have stopped attending. 'It happened at three in the morning,' said Syed Hassan, 46, a maths teacher. 'The windows were all shattered and the pages of books scattered on the ground, even our Korans. If our people do not get educated, it will be a disaster for our country.' Sulieman, headmaster of a boys' high school, showed off several home schools where girls were studying art and maths. In one village, a three-room home school was crammed with students, but another had just closed after an arson attack. Sulieman said the arson was not necessarily by rebels - there are rivalries for contracts to run home schools and 'personal enmities' lead to violence. 'Once I was walking late in my village when three Taliban warned me to stop educating girls,' he said. 'I told them the Koran says girls should be educated as well as boys, and that my school was teaching young girls to memorise the Koran and pray five times a day.
  7. Germany Opens Major Islam Conference

    I've chosen not to post links from neo-nazi sites. For although this would highlight the connection with Islam/muslims and the increased support for extreme right wing parties, i would rather not visit those sites and help spread their message. These links are from rather less extreme sources. (www.)"city-journal/html/eon_4_25_02td.html"]city-journal/html/eon_4_25_02td.html[/url] (www.)"blogs.telegraph.co.uk/foreign/colinrandall/april2006/lepen.htm"]blogs.telegraph.co.uk/foreign/colin...l2006/lepen.htm[/url] (www.)"iht/articles/2006/02/07/news/europe.php"]iht/articles/2006/02/07/news/europe.php[/url] (www.)"news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3898695.stm"]news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3898695.stm[/url] (www.)"commentisfree.guardian.c.uk/inayat_bunglawala/2006/05/the_bnps_referendum_on_islam.hml"]commentisfree.guardian.c .uk/inayat...m_on_islam.html[/url]
  8. Bush Concealing Level Of Iraq Violence

    Bush has a decision to make. He can either withdraw his troops, and to hell with the consequences for Iraqi's, or he can take full advantage of his weaponry and get his soldiers to fight without one hand tied behind their backs. The enemy is obviously prepared to use "any means necessary" to inflict casualties. Why is this not reciprocated? Either get the hell out, or finish the job!! I'd like british troops withdrawn immediately. The Iraqi's obviously don't want them there, and are willing to accept the consequences of they're leaving, so to hell with them. British troops have a far more important task within their own shores. Security (much like charity) begins at home.
  9. How Long Before Someone Takes A Shot At Benedict Xvi ?

    It just goes to show how things have changed. I suppose there wasn't much anger against muslims 25 yrs ago, because i can't think of any major backlash against this attack. If this were to happen today i doubt there would be as much tolerance. I can't believe the Pope forgave his would-be assassin, and visited him in prison. What a top bloke! I bet that muslim felt a bit stupid.
  10. Germany Opens Major Islam Conference

    More pandering, more appeasement and another validation for the merits of victimhood. Muslims show a constant intolerance towards the preaching of other faiths (this forum being a prime example), sometimes to the point of making it a criminal offence. Yet they expect government funding for the preaching of their faith in kafir lands!!! They also want to ram their ideology down the throats of vulnerable non-muslim schoolchildren! Maybe we should incorporate the whole of society, and have Satanists give lectures at local Islamic schools. Is it any wonder Neo-Nazism is on the rise in Germany!!
  11. Gaza: The Children Killed In A War

    I wonder how many muslims on this forum would honestly mourn the death of an israeli jewish boy, killed by his arab neighbours? You either stop playing with matches, or you stop crying "fire".
  12. The Enemy Within Our Midst.

    Eoin, it seems you are not above making a crass generalisation yourself. I do however agree with much of what you have to say, but not all. The 'Fed-up' Brigade, as you put it, does consist of a rather laughable bunch of professional whingers, who at the very mention of 'speed cameras' or 'police quotas' will launch into a moaning session akin to a pensioner with a cold pudding. Talk Sport is the ideal platform from where to view this in it's entire glory, in particular the John Gaunt show!! However it is very dismissive of you to resign the rise in anti-islamic sentiment in Britain to the exlusive domain of the 'Daily Mail' mob. This is far from reflective of the true nature of the issue and it's wider implications. If the 'Daily Mail' were to describe the vast majority of my friends, the terms "limp-wristed", "wishy-washy", "apologists" and of course "Guardian-readers" would be strewn across the page. This would not however be an accurate guide to their position on the particular issue at hand. The fate of innocent people of all types would not be far from the minds of many, but even the 'Liberal Elite' have begun to realise that their guilt-laced good intentions may not be in sync with the intentions of their intended recipients. I realised this a couple of years ago, yet quite happily read the Observer (yes, guardian-reader) without a hint of irony, but would recoil in horror at the sight of a Melanie Phillips column. I'm afraid i just don't buy your theory about the reasoning behind the discernible rise in anti-islamic feeling over the past 5-10 years.
  13. Is There A Plan To Take Over The World?

    This is probably why Le Pen did so well at the ballot box. This type of arrogance from an alien minority is bound to meet with a reaction. I've also heard these claims about the 'islamification' of Britain, Londanistan and the flag flying over Downing Street. I'm not sure what these people hope to acheive by making these far-fetched claims, but it certainly helps to foster more hatred and resentment for them and their kind. If this is the desired result, then mission accomplished!!
  14. The Horrible Truth About The Scientology Cult.

    Sounds familiar. I think you should apologise for your 'Scientologophobia'.
  15. The Enemy Within Our Midst.

    Makko, it's just a case of same ol' same ol'. I can't believe the majority of these people are not even willing to entertain the notion that the "british" muslim community is becoming increasingly more hated by the day. Those that are aware of this state of affairs will happily deflect attention away from the actual causes, and shoot the messenger. If these people actually believe that it is i that is living in a fantasy world, they have no idea about the country they live in. It's the same throughout Europe. I have family living throughout the continent and their tales sound so familiar. I suppose everybody must be paranoid. I'll be sure to add 'islamophobia', 'moderate-muslim' and 'peaceful Islam' to my growing list of delusional concepts.
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