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Absolute truth

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  1. Who Is Jesus (Peace Be Upon Him) -Is Jesus Our Creator?

    Can a fly be god ?! A brief debate with a Christian, on the subject of the incarnation, that Imam Fakhr Al-Deen Al-Razi recounts in his Al-Arba’een fi Usul Al-Deen. The imam writes: I told the Christian: do you accept that the absence of evidence, is not evidence for absence? He said: yes. So I told him: what is your evidence that the being of God did not assume the body of Zayd, or the body of ‘Amr, or the body of this fly, or the body of this ant? He said: such a thing is impossible. We believe that God assumed the body of Christ, because Christ was supported with miracles. Miracles like the resurrection of the dead, and the healing of the blind and of the lepers. So if none of those miracles appeared at the hands of Zayd or ‘Amr, how can we prove that God subsists within their bodies? I responded: you initially submitted that the absence of evidence, is not evidence for absence. And you consider the appearance of a miracle at the hands of someone, to be evidence for the subsistence of God within the body of said person. As such, the absence of this evidence, should not count as evidence against that subsistence. Ultimately, this entails that you don’t know whether or not God subsists within the body of this ant, or the body of this fly. And any religion which entails such ignorance, is truly despicable. Moreover, in the same way miracles appeared at the hands of Jesus peace be upon him, miracles also appeared at the hands of Moses peace be upon him. In fact, the transformation of a wooden staff into a snake, is even greater than the resurrection of the dead. So if Jesus’ miracles are proof for his divinity, then Moses’ miracles should also be proof for his divinity. https://keystotheunseen.com/2018/01/20/al-razi-debate-with-a-christian/
  2. English Quran Tafseer/Commentaries

    English Tafseer/Commentaries Of The Noble Quran Some of the English Commentaries/Tafseer Of The Noble Quran that are Available online: 1 Maruf Ul Quran By Mufti Shafi Usmani (Translated By Mufti Taqi Usmani) (Recommended) Visit https://archive.org/compress/English-MaarifulQuran/formats=TEXT%20PDF&file=/English-MaarifulQuran.zip (pdf) Or http://www.islamicstudies.info/quran/maarif/maarif.php (online) 2 Tafseer Daryabadi by Abdul Majid Daryabadi Visit http://quranwebsite.com/read/abdul_majid_darababadi__english.html (Vol 1,2 and 3) (pdf) https://archive.org/download/Quran-EnglishCommentary-AbdulMajidDaryabadiVol.4/Quran-EnglishCommentary-AbdulMajidDaryabadiVol.4.pdf (Vol 4) (pdf) Or http://www.islamicstudies.info/quran/daryabadi (online) 3 Tafseer Ibn Kathir (Abridged) (Ulema Guidance Required) http://quranwebsite.com/read/Tafsir%20Ibn%20Kathir%20-%20Volume%2001-10%20-%20English.pdf (pdf) Or http://www.qtafsir.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3000&Itemid=731 (Online) 4 Quran- The Living Truth by Basheer Ahmad Mohydeen https://yassarnalquran.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/quran-the-living-truth.pdf (pdf) 5 Anwar Ul Bayan https://archive.org/compress/IlluminatingDiscoursesOnTheNobleQurantafseerAnwarulBayan/formats=IMAGE%20CONTAINER%20PDF&file=/IlluminatingDiscoursesOnTheNobleQurantafseerAnwarulBayan.zip (pdf) 6 Tadabbur Ul Quran http://quranwebsite.com/tadaddbur-e-quran%20english/tadabbur_e_quran_english.html (pdf) 7 The Message of The Quran (Ulema Guidance Required due to some Deviant Mutazila Views) by Mohammad Asad https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.muhammad-asad.com%2FMessage-of-Quran.pdf&usg=AOvVaw0_1spHnzDNLB1olwTmke4g&ved=2ahUKEwj93MbZz9nYAhXKUbwKHYQiBkMQFjAAegQIFRAB (pdf) 8 In the Shade of The Quran by Syed Qutb (Ulema Guidance Required due to some Deviant Views) https://yassarnalquran.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/in-the-shade-of-the-quran-full-set.pdf (pdf) 9 The Study Quran by Syed Nasr Hossein (Ulema Guidance Required due to some Deviant Views) https://archive.org/download/TheStudyQuran_201708/Seyyed%20Hossein%20Nasr%20et%20al.%20%28eds.%29-The%20Study%20Quran_%20A%20New%20Translation%20and%20Commentary-HarperOne%20%282015%29.pdf (pdf) 10 Israr Ut Tanzeel http://english-tafseer.com/Index.html (online) 11 Tafseer Al Qurtubi Vol. 1 (Ulema Guidance Required) https://archive.org/download/TafsirAlQurtubiVolI/Tafsir%20al%20Qurtubi%20-%20Vol%20I.pdf (pdf) 12 Dawat Ul Quran by Shams Pirzada http://www.islamicstudies.info/quran/dawat (online) 13 Tafheem Ul Quran by Syed Abul Ala Maududdi (Recommended) https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=https%3A%2F%2Fplay.google.com%2Fstore%2Fapps%2Fdetails%3Fid%3Dcom.iroshni.tafheemulquraneng%26hl%3Den%26referrer%3Dutm_source%253Dgoogle%2526utm_medium%253Dorganic%2526utm_term%253Dtafheem%2Bul%2Bquran%2Benglish%2Bpdf%26pcampaignid%3DAPPU_1_1WtcWqeRKcqk8AXuxJXgBQ&usg=AOvVaw1V2ddfX-N6mXp0Mep-nULi&ved=0ahUKEwjnz7Tjy9nYAhVKErwKHW5iBVwQ8oQBCDEwAQ (Play Store) Or http://www.islamicstudies.info/tafheem.php (online) 14 Abdullah Yusuf Ali (Ulema Guidance Required due to some Deviant Views) https://archive.org/download/English-quran-with-commentariesyusuf-ali/english-quran-with-commentaries%28yusuf-ali%29.pdf (Pdf) Or https://archive.org/download/TheHolyQuranEnglishTranslationoftheMeaningandCommentary/The%20Holy%20Quran%20-%20Abdullah%20Yusuf%20Ali%20IFTA.pdf (With Commentary) (Pdf) 15 Imtiyaz Ahmed (Recommended) http://easyquranfoundation.com/?page_id=674 (pdf) 16 The Gracious Quran by Ahmed Zaki Hammad https://archive.org/download/01114TheGraciousQuranComplete/%2101-114_The_Gracious_Quran_%28Complete%29.pdf (pdf) 17 Noorul Irfan (May Contain Some Devaint Barielvy Views, therefore this Tafseer should be read Under Ulema Guidance) https://archive.org/download/TafsirNoorUlIrfanEnglishV1/Tafsir%20Noor%20ul%20Irfan%20%28English%29%20-v1.pdf (Vol 1) Or https://archive.org/download/TafsirNoorUlIrfanEnglishV2/Tafsir%20Noor%20ul%20Irfan%20%28English%29%20-v2.pdf (Vol 2) 18 Saheeh International (Recommended) https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.kalamullah.com%2FBooks%2FQuran%2520-%2520Saheeh%2520International%2520Translation%2520.pdf&usg=AOvVaw20Vcy8iUWLISX3xeB8ZLzt&ved=2ahUKEwijxcKPwtnYAhWJyLwKHW_2BGoQFjAEegQIBxAB (pdf) Or https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://quran.com/%3Flocal%3Den&ved=2ahUKEwjw27DWxtvYAhXIvrwKHfsmDKIQFjAMegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw09BviQ8MSfFPXpXYhH2gq6 (Online) 19 Abdel Haleem https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.kaskas.com%2Fhome%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2013%2F11%2FQuran-Abdel-Haleem-Translation-1.pdf&usg=AFQjCNE4qNL3aB1kgpvAKZPcf1gZTpJAfQ&ved=0ahUKEwi5rdiYjuPVAhULpo8KHRgbBwsQFggiMAA (pdf) 20 Dr Mehmood Ghali (Recommended) https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=http%3A%2F%2Fxa.yimg.com%2Fkq%2Fgroups%2F19371438%2F1315958654%2Fname%2FQuran.pdf&usg=AOvVaw17h-nVs-vUggeJKdtJXzRO&ved=2ahUKEwjo4NXJvdnYAhVEvLwKHZRMDzYQFjAEegQICBAB (pdf) 21 Mohammad William Pickthai (Recommended) https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=http%3A%2F%2Fislamtomorrow.com%2Fdownloads%2FQuranPikhtal.pdf&usg=AOvVaw2dKbvsNP4NFdTsCxOVmMw8&ved=2ahUKEwistc_bwdnYAhUCE7wKHdiJANIQFjACegQIERAB 22 Aysha Bewley (Recommended) https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=https%3A%2F%2Fasimiqbal2nd.files.wordpress.com%2F2010%2F03%2Fquran-bewley.pdf&usg=AFQjCNGhtwgqvtkGqr3dNx8mtMCppIGMNA&ved=0ahUKEwiHvvuO_aTVAhUJL48KHd38D5cQFggbMAA 23 Translation Of The Meanings Of The Noble Quran written by Dr. Mohammad Muhsin Khan and Dr. Mohammad Taqi Ud Deen Al Hilali https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gph.gov.sa%2Far-sa%2FDocLib%2Fqurantrans%2F6_PDFDownloadLinkFull.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3h2TXX8ZDxmVT1qxS-ohFH&ved=2ahUKEwjVufHxw9nYAhUCNbwKHXtGBgQQFjABegQIFBAB (pdf) Or http://www.pdfquran.com/download/english/english-quran.pdf (pdf) Or http://qurancomplex.gov.sa/Quran/Targama/Targama.asp?SecOrder=4&SubItemID=1&SubSecOrder=1&TabID=4&l=arb&t=eng (Online) 24 The Clear Quran –A Thematic English Translation (of the meaning of The Noble Quran by Dr. Mustafa Khattab (Recommended) https://www.google.co.in/url?rct=j&sa=t&source=web&url=https%3A%2F%2Fplay.google.com%2Fstore%2Fapps%2Fdetails%3Fid%3Dcom.quran.labs.androidquran%26hl%3Den%26referrer%3Dutm_source%253Dgoogle%2526utm_medium%253Dorganic%2526utm_term%253Dquran%2Bbest%2Btranslation%26pcampaignid%3DAPPU_1_5j17WZSMEoi18QWJhIyYDA&usg=AFQjCNEMZ6U0X2Mi4W9QRusUkqlM04lOkA&ved=0ahUKEwiUl42qjKzVAhWIWrwKHQkCA8MQ5YQBCKkBMBI (Play Store) 25 Irfan Ul Quran by Dr. Tahir Ul Qadri http://www.irfan-ul-quran.com/quran/english/contents/sura/cols/0/ar/1/ur/1/ra/1en/1/sid/36#65 (online) Or http://www.irfan-ul-quran.com/quran/english/tid/50/Irfan-ul-Quran-Apps.html (Play Store) 26 Al Huda (Word To Word) http://www.alhudaecampus.com/english-juz-complete (Pdf) 27 Mohammad Mohar Ali (Word To Word) https://yassarnalquran.wordpress.com/2012/07/26/word-for-word-translation-of-the-quran/ (Pdf) 28 Dr. Shehnaz And Kausar (Word To Word) http://www.emuslim.com/Quran/Translation_English.asp (Pdf) Or http://www.islamicstudies.info/quran/wordtranslation.php (Online) 29 Summary of All 30 Parts Of The Noble Quran (Juz By Juz) https://yassarnalquran.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/juzbyjuz.pdf (Pdf) 30 Quran Dictionary by Abdul Kareem Parekh https://yassarnalquran.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/the-easy-dictionary-of-the-quran.pdf (pdf) 31 Why Islam (Proofs From Modern Science) https://yassarnalquran.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/why-islam-proofs-of-modern-science.pdf (Pdf) 32 Scientific Truths in the Quran https://yassarnalquran.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/scientific-truths-in-the-quran.pdf (Pdf) 33 The Unchallengeable Miracles of the Quran (Recommended) https://archive.org/download/TheUnchallengeableMiraclesOfTheQuran-/TheUnchallengeableMiraclesOfTheQuran-Alhamdulillah-library.blogspot.in.pdf 34 Quran- The Miracles of the Miracles by Ahmed Deedat https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.islamicbulletin.org/free_downloads/quran/the_miracle_of_miracles_deedat.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwj76JG5u9vYAhWMEbwKHQKNAj8QFjAAegQIERAB&usg=AOvVaw1d36SLSR4fkkKXsh1qnKQ8 (Pdf) 35 Ahmad Raza Khan http://tanzil.net/trans/en.ahmedraza (doc) or http://tanzil.net/#trans/en.ahmedraza/19:1 (Online) 36 Talal Itani https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://blog.clearquran.com/download/&ved=2ahUKEwiRgabnxdvYAhWDurwKHVLIAGgQjBAwAXoECAkQBw&usg=AOvVaw3y4lNhpydEVsk3Lox3erA2 (Pdf) Or https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://m.clearquran.com/&ved=2ahUKEwiRgabnxdvYAhWDurwKHVLIAGgQFjAAegQICRAD&usg=AOvVaw0JQaRaL2YyX8L75ux1IoC9 (Online) 37 Kanzul Eeman https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.nooremadinah.net/Al-Quran/EnglishTranslation/Download/QuranEnglishTranslation.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwj6vqaZyNvYAhVBuJQKHR_pBkUQFjAAegQIDRAB&usg=AOvVaw1Y9tWHbj5furocsFtIm_ic (Pdf) Or http://ahadees.com/english-translation.html (Online) 38 Ahmed Ali https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.studyquran.org/Ahmed_Ali_Al_Quran.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwja6qXtyNvYAhVBuJQKHR_pBkUQFjAAegQIFRAB&usg=AOvVaw1cumJ7tS2eiIlmS2nqem0M (Pdf) Or http://tanzil.net/#trans/en.ahmedali/19:1 (Online)
  3. Islam in Australia (G'Day mates)

    Why Australian prisoners are reverting to Islam ? Academics, imams and prison workers widely agree that conversions to Islam are now commonplace in Australia’s prisons. Robbie Maestracci, a community outreach worker with the Islamic Council of Queensland, pays weekly visits to Muslim inmates in the greater Brisbane area. He believes there is a prominent trend of conversions to Islam among detainees. “Without a doubt there is … We’re constantly being made aware of new names of people who have embraced Islam or names of people who are wanting to embrace Islam. At least every two weeks, there’s another name or two being added to our list,” Maestracci says. Michael Kennedy, a veteran detective of 20 years, knows more than most about the subject. Since leaving the New South Wales organised crime squad he has studied Islam and incarceration extensively as an academic at the University of Western Sydney. Kennedy has maintained contact with a “lot of good crooks” met in his former life. They exchange letters now and again. His correspondents drift in and out of jail, giving him a unique insight into the place of religion in prison. “They’re pretty easy to talk to. One in particular I’m thinking of, I said [name removed], ‘did you get religious?’” “He said ‘Oh no, but a lot of people do, it’s the way you get by. It’s the way you’re able to deal with what’s happened to you.’ “You’re isolated from all the people that you know in your life, whether good people or bad. You need to connect with someone about something.” In this reading, the discovery of religion is essentially a coping mechanism, and a way to forge a shared identity in the dog-eat-dog world of prison. Kennedy says more often than not it’s a positive influence, which can open a pathway to rehabilitation. It gives inmates some semblance of structure and provides a motive to stay away from drugs and alcohol. “I actually don’t think it’s a bad [coping mechanism], but some would argue that it is,” he said. “If you think about it, from my point of view, it gives them a bit of hope.” The best publicly available information comes from a 2013 census of NSW prisoners, which suggests Muslims remain a minority, although one that is overrepresented. The census showed Muslims accounted for about 9.3% of the state’s prison population compared with 3.2% of the NSW population. Muslim inmates pray in the yard at Goulburn correctional centre where the prisons boss admits the Supermax facility is a hotbed of Islam. Picture: Sean DaveySource:News Corp Australia “Inmates suspected of, or identified as, holding radical views are closely monitored by experienced and well trained staff, and moved away from other inmates if necessary.” But Jones believes there are risks in segregating already radicalised offenders from the general prison population, an approach not adopted in Victoria, where they are dispersed. A spokeswoman for Corrections Victoria said it disperses prisoners “wherever practicable” and “according to their assessed level of risk and individual needs”. “This approach aims to prevent extremist views being continually reinforced by like-minded prisoners,” she said. Ali Kadri, the vice-president of the Islamic Council of Queensland, believes there is no real evidence suggesting prisoners are becoming radicalised. He believes, ultimately, religious conversions are a force for good. “Not just that, we find people who have always been socially isolated and are living a life in crime finding faith in prison and feeling apart of a community, so they have more motivation to behave than they did before,” Kadri says. “We believe that faith, not just Islam, has the potential to help people who are in that situation, to find the right path.” https://islamicnafahat.wordpress.com/2018/01/05/why-australian-prisoners-are-reverting-to-islam/
  4. Praise be to Allah, the Lord of the Worlds; and may His blessings and peace be upon our Prophet Muhammad and upon all his Family and Companions. Bralwiya is a Sufi sect which was founded in the town of Barili, in the Uttar Pradesh state in India during British colonialism. This sect is famous for exceeding the proper bounds of Prophets and Awliya (pious people). They launched "Madani channel". It's a group, which is distinct from the majority of Muslims in some points of belief (‘aqaid) and innovated practices (al-a’mal al-mubtada’ah). Ahmad Ridha Khan bin Taqi Ali Khan founded this sect in 1272 A.H; he died in 1340 A.H. He named himself Abdul Mustapha. The person who gave him this name (Abdul Mustapha) committed a very serious offence because worship should not be dedicated except to Allah. Their false ideologies: 1) The Prophet is an absolute assistant to Allah, and that the whole world is under his control, he runs it as he wishes, gives whatever he wants to whomever he wants, and takes away what he wants from whomever he wants. His order is irrefutable and no one can review or comment on his judgement. They say: 'whoever does not make the Prophet the Owner of all the things is deprived from the sweetness of the Sunnah.' 2) The Awliya (pious people) after the Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam) have the power to run this world. 3) They have indeed exaggerated in their view about the Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam) until they raised him to the status of Lordship. Ahmed Ridha Khan wrote in Hadaiq Bakhshish (the gardens of grants): 'O, Muhammad (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam), I cannot call you Allah, but I cannot distinguish between you both. Your matter is in the hands of Allah, He is the One who is best aware about your reality.' 4) They believe that the Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam) is present and sees the actions of all the creation at all times and everywhere. They deny him being a human being; they consider him as a light of the lights of Allah. 5) They urge their followers to call upon the Prophets and Walis (pious people) for help, and whoever denies this, they label him as apostate. 6) They say that Sadaqah should be paid on a dead person according to the number of Salah and Sawm (fasting) that he had missed in his life. The amount of Sadaqah that should be paid on every Salah and fasting is the same as that of Sadaqah Al-Fitr. Whoever holds the false beliefs of this group has not been guided to the Truth. Therefore, it is not permissible for a Muslim to follow them or join them. But rather, it would be incumbent on him to advise them and warn others about their wrong belief. Therefore, he should continue to implore his Lord day and night, especially since ‘Aa’ishah may Allaah be pleased with her narrated that the Prophet , used to commence the night prayer saying: “Allaahumma: O Allaah, Lord of Jibreel (Gabriel), Mikaa’eel (Michael) and Israafeel (Israfil); Creator of the heavens and the earth, Knower of the unseen and the seen. You judge between Your slaves concerning that about which they differ. O Allaah, guide me to the matters of truth about which they differ by your permission, for You are the One Who guides to the straight path)." [Muslim] Allah knows best.
  5. Dr Tauseef Ahmad Parray From the classical to the contemporary era, numerous biographical works have been written on the life (seerah) of the last Prophet (SAW)—the only personage whose every detail, aspect, and feature, of whose blessed and illustrious life is thoroughly known to the world. Among these, a good number have been written, especially in the modern period, by Western (Muslim and non-Muslims alike) scholars in English. A good deal of this scholarship—related to the life, reforms, and achievements—is also produced in the form of the books on Islamic history. Here, in this write-up, views of some of the Muslims scholars, through their books on Islamic history—viz. Syed Ameer Ali, Masudul Hasan, Sayyed Hossein Nasr, and Akbar S. Ahmed—are presented to get a glimpse of how they perceive and present the achievements of the Prophet (SAW) as a Prophet vis-à-vis reformer. Prophet Muhammad (SAW) “came to humankind”, as Professor Tariq Ramadan writes in his ‘In The Footsteps of the Prophet: Lessons from the Life of Muhammad’/ The Messenger (2007, p. 214) “with a message of faith, ethics, and hope, in which the One reminds all people of His presence, His requirements, and the final Day of Return and Encounter”. He touched every aspect of human life: he was a savior, liberator, and protector of the ‘oppressed’ humanity. Benefactor of humanity, Prophet (SAW was the greatest reformer the world has ever produced. He made great reforms in the socio-religious and politico-economic spheres. In the modern times, Prophet (SAW) is presented as a ‘reformer’ who considerably raised the social and ethical level of the Arabs of his time. The Prophet (SAW) was not only a religious preacher, a soldier, a statesman, but also a great administrator as well. He presided over, after hijrah from Makkah to Medina in 622 CE, the Commonwealth of Islam for ten years (622-32CE); and, thus, in the words of Syed Ameer Ali (d. 1928; Indian Jurist, political leader and author of numerous books on Islamic history) in his A Short History of the Saracens (2011, pp. 19 & 55): “During the ten years [Prophet] Mohammad [SAW] presided over the commonwealth of Islam [622-32 CE], a great change had come over the character of the Arab people”. And, in this short span of ten years at Medina, Ameer Ali adds, “a congeries of warring tribes and clans were rapidly consolidated into a nation under the influence of one great Idea. The work done within that short period will always remain as one of the most wonderful achievements recorded in history”. Writing on the achievements of Prophet (SAW), Professor Masudul Hasan (Pakistani historian), in his “History of Islam” (2015; vol. 1, pp. 76-77) writes: “the Holy Prophet [SAW] built an Ummah out of the people never united before; established a religion that elevated the soul; created an egalitarian society; laid the basis of an empire and set up new ideals before mankind. … He liberated man by planning for him a new political, economic, and social order, free from exploitation”. “In the wider perspective of universal history”, Professor Hasan avers, “we discern in the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] the greatest man the world has ever produced. As regards all standards, …, He (SAW)] is the greatest man of all times. … Of all men, the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] has exercised greatest influence upon the human race, and he stands to this day, and for all times to come, at the peak of humanity” (p. 77). Professor Sayyed Hossein Nasr (George Washington University, USA), in his “Islam: Religion, History, Civilization” (2002: 5), is of the opinion that the “primordial character of the Islamic message”, which was brought by the last Prophet (SAW), “is reflected not only in its essentiality, universality, and simplicity, but also in its inclusive attitude toward the religions and forms of wisdom that preceded it”. Writing on ‘The Prophet [SAW]: His Significance, Life, and Deeds’ (pp. 46-47), Prof. Nasr puts forth very eloquently that “The Prophet [SAW] is seen by Muslims as the most perfect of all of God’s creatures, the perfect man par excellence (al-Insan al-Kamil) and the beloved of God (Habib Allah), whom the Quran calls an excellent model (Uswah Hasanah) to emulate. He represents perfect surrender to God combined with proximity (qurb) to Him, which makes him the best interpreter of God’s message as well as its most faithful transmitter”. On the Prophet’s (SAW) achievements and contributions in the Medinan phase, Professor Nasr holds that in Medina, “the Prophet [SAW] became the ruler of a community; was at once statesman, judge, and military leader as well as the Prophet of God” (pp. 50-51). Thus, he accepts, like others, that in a short span of twenty-three-year period (as Prophet), “the Prophet [SAW] succeeded in not only uniting Arabia under the banner of Islam, but also establishing a religious community of global extent, for which he remains always the ideal model of human behaviour and action” (p. 52). He further states that “When we think of the life of the Prophet [SAW] in its totality, we must not only think of him as the leader of a human community, a father and head of a family, a man who married several wives, or a ruler who participated in battles or made social and political decisions for the preservation of Islam. We must also meditate on his inner life of prayer, vigil, and fasting and especially the mi‘raj [The Ascension], … create[ing] a balance between the outward and the inward, the physical and the spiritual” (p. 53). In his “The Heart of Islam” (2004), Professor Nasr enunciates almost similar views, and describes the significance of Prophet (SAW) as essential in order to “understand the heart of Islam” (p. 28). Along similar lines, the Pakistani-American professor, Akbar S Ahmed (American University, Washington, USA) in his “Discovering Islam: Making Sense of Muslim History and Society” (2002) puts forward these insights: “Equality, the status of women, the rights of the less privileged (minorities, poorer working groups)—the shibboleths of our age—were reflected in the Prophet’s [SAW] message. It was a revolution the Prophet [SAW] wished to bring about, to end what came to be known as the Jahiliyya, the dark age” (p. 19). “In a short span” of 23 years as Prophet (SAW), he continues, “he [SAW] had played the role of father, husband, chief, warrior, friend and Prophet. His respect for learning, tolerance of others, generosity of spirit, concern for the weak, gentle piety and desire for a better, cleaner, world would constitute the main elements of the Muslim ideal. For Muslims , the life of the Prophet (SAW) is the triumph of hope over despair, [and of] light over darkness” (p. 21). Thus, we see that although Prophet (SAW) had, and displayed, in abundance, the qualities of “Piety, forbearance, courage and judgment—required in some degree by any leader”, but “what is striking about his behaviour and temperament is the most unexpected quality in tribal life, gentleness” (p. 22). The Prophet’s (SAW) “years of tribulation were brief; success followed in abundance. Within his lifetime he had established a religion and a state. … One hundred years after his death the Islamic empire was greater than Rome at its zenith” (pp. 28-29). These glimpses clearly show the greatness of ‘the greatest man of all times’. It is in the Prophet’s (SAW) illustrious life, that we see absolutely everything was ‘an instrument of renewal and transformation’ from the slightest detail to the greatest events; and all those (be they Muslims or believers of any faith) who study and write on Prophet’s (SAW) life, regardless of their personal religious belief, can derive instruction from this, thus reaching toward the essence of the message of light of faith. To use again, and to end with, the terminology of Tariq Ramadan, the Prophet (SAW) “prayed, meditated, transformed himself, and transformed the world. … He was beloved by God and an example among humans. He prayed and he contemplated. He loved, he gave. He served, he transformed. The Prophet [SAW] was the light that leads to Light, and in learning from his life, believers return to the Source of Life and find His light, His warmth, and His love” (pp. 214-216). —The author is Assistant Professor, Islamic Studies, at GDC, Pulwama. https://kashmirreader.com/2017/12/21/prophet-muhammad-saw-in-the-eyes-of-muslim-historians-some-perspectives/
  6. Dr Tauseef Ahmad Parray From the classical to the contemporary era, numerous biographical works have been written on the life (seerah) of the last Prophet (SAW)—the only personage whose every detail, aspect, and feature, of whose blessed and illustrious life is thoroughly known to the world. Among these, a good number have been written, especially in the modern period, by Western (Muslim and non-Muslims alike) scholars in English. A good deal of this scholarship—related to the life, reforms, and achievements—is also produced in the form of the books on Islamic history. Here, in this write-up, views of some of the Muslims scholars, through their books on Islamic history—viz. Syed Ameer Ali, Masudul Hasan, Sayyed Hossein Nasr, and Akbar S. Ahmed—are presented to get a glimpse of how they perceive and present the achievements of the Prophet (SAW) as a Prophet vis-à-vis reformer. Prophet Muhammad (SAW) “came to humankind”, as Professor Tariq Ramadan writes in his ‘In The Footsteps of the Prophet: Lessons from the Life of Muhammad’/ The Messenger (2007, p. 214) “with a message of faith, ethics, and hope, in which the One reminds all people of His presence, His requirements, and the final Day of Return and Encounter”. He touched every aspect of human life: he was a savior, liberator, and protector of the ‘oppressed’ humanity. Benefactor of humanity, Prophet (SAW was the greatest reformer the world has ever produced. He made great reforms in the socio-religious and politico-economic spheres. In the modern times, Prophet (SAW) is presented as a ‘reformer’ who considerably raised the social and ethical level of the Arabs of his time. The Prophet (SAW) was not only a religious preacher, a soldier, a statesman, but also a great administrator as well. He presided over, after hijrah from Makkah to Medina in 622 CE, the Commonwealth of Islam for ten years (622-32CE); and, thus, in the words of Syed Ameer Ali (d. 1928; Indian Jurist, political leader and author of numerous books on Islamic history) in his A Short History of the Saracens (2011, pp. 19 & 55): “During the ten years [Prophet] Mohammad [SAW] presided over the commonwealth of Islam [622-32 CE], a great change had come over the character of the Arab people”. And, in this short span of ten years at Medina, Ameer Ali adds, “a congeries of warring tribes and clans were rapidly consolidated into a nation under the influence of one great Idea. The work done within that short period will always remain as one of the most wonderful achievements recorded in history”. Writing on the achievements of Prophet (SAW), Professor Masudul Hasan (Pakistani historian), in his “History of Islam” (2015; vol. 1, pp. 76-77) writes: “the Holy Prophet [SAW] built an Ummah out of the people never united before; established a religion that elevated the soul; created an egalitarian society; laid the basis of an empire and set up new ideals before mankind. … He liberated man by planning for him a new political, economic, and social order, free from exploitation”. “In the wider perspective of universal history”, Professor Hasan avers, “we discern in the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] the greatest man the world has ever produced. As regards all standards, …, He (SAW)] is the greatest man of all times. … Of all men, the Holy Prophet of Islam [SAW] has exercised greatest influence upon the human race, and he stands to this day, and for all times to come, at the peak of humanity” (p. 77). Professor Sayyed Hossein Nasr (George Washington University, USA), in his “Islam: Religion, History, Civilization” (2002: 5), is of the opinion that the “primordial character of the Islamic message”, which was brought by the last Prophet (SAW), “is reflected not only in its essentiality, universality, and simplicity, but also in its inclusive attitude toward the religions and forms of wisdom that preceded it”. Writing on ‘The Prophet [SAW]: His Significance, Life, and Deeds’ (pp. 46-47), Prof. Nasr puts forth very eloquently that “The Prophet [SAW] is seen by Muslims as the most perfect of all of God’s creatures, the perfect man par excellence (al-Insan al-Kamil) and the beloved of God (Habib Allah), whom the Quran calls an excellent model (Uswah Hasanah) to emulate. He represents perfect surrender to God combined with proximity (qurb) to Him, which makes him the best interpreter of God’s message as well as its most faithful transmitter”. On the Prophet’s (SAW) achievements and contributions in the Medinan phase, Professor Nasr holds that in Medina, “the Prophet [SAW] became the ruler of a community; was at once statesman, judge, and military leader as well as the Prophet of God” (pp. 50-51). Thus, he accepts, like others, that in a short span of twenty-three-year period (as Prophet), “the Prophet [SAW] succeeded in not only uniting Arabia under the banner of Islam, but also establishing a religious community of global extent, for which he remains always the ideal model of human behaviour and action” (p. 52). He further states that “When we think of the life of the Prophet [SAW] in its totality, we must not only think of him as the leader of a human community, a father and head of a family, a man who married several wives, or a ruler who participated in battles or made social and political decisions for the preservation of Islam. We must also meditate on his inner life of prayer, vigil, and fasting and especially the mi‘raj [The Ascension], … create[ing] a balance between the outward and the inward, the physical and the spiritual” (p. 53). In his “The Heart of Islam” (2004), Professor Nasr enunciates almost similar views, and describes the significance of Prophet (SAW) as essential in order to “understand the heart of Islam” (p. 28). Along similar lines, the Pakistani-American professor, Akbar S Ahmed (American University, Washington, USA) in his “Discovering Islam: Making Sense of Muslim History and Society” (2002) puts forward these insights: “Equality, the status of women, the rights of the less privileged (minorities, poorer working groups)—the shibboleths of our age—were reflected in the Prophet’s [SAW] message. It was a revolution the Prophet [SAW] wished to bring about, to end what came to be known as the Jahiliyya, the dark age” (p. 19). “In a short span” of 23 years as Prophet (SAW), he continues, “he [SAW] had played the role of father, husband, chief, warrior, friend and Prophet. His respect for learning, tolerance of others, generosity of spirit, concern for the weak, gentle piety and desire for a better, cleaner, world would constitute the main elements of the Muslim ideal. For Muslims , the life of the Prophet (SAW) is the triumph of hope over despair, [and of] light over darkness” (p. 21). Thus, we see that although Prophet (SAW) had, and displayed, in abundance, the qualities of “Piety, forbearance, courage and judgment—required in some degree by any leader”, but “what is striking about his behaviour and temperament is the most unexpected quality in tribal life, gentleness” (p. 22). The Prophet’s (SAW) “years of tribulation were brief; success followed in abundance. Within his lifetime he had established a religion and a state. … One hundred years after his death the Islamic empire was greater than Rome at its zenith” (pp. 28-29). These glimpses clearly show the greatness of ‘the greatest man of all times’. It is in the Prophet’s (SAW) illustrious life, that we see absolutely everything was ‘an instrument of renewal and transformation’ from the slightest detail to the greatest events; and all those (be they Muslims or believers of any faith) who study and write on Prophet’s (SAW) life, regardless of their personal religious belief, can derive instruction from this, thus reaching toward the essence of the message of light of faith. To use again, and to end with, the terminology of Tariq Ramadan, the Prophet (SAW) “prayed, meditated, transformed himself, and transformed the world. … He was beloved by God and an example among humans. He prayed and he contemplated. He loved, he gave. He served, he transformed. The Prophet [SAW] was the light that leads to Light, and in learning from his life, believers return to the Source of Life and find His light, His warmth, and His love” (pp. 214-216). —The author is Assistant Professor, Islamic Studies, at GDC, Pulwama. https://kashmirreader.com/2017/12/21/prophet-muhammad-saw-in-the-eyes-of-muslim-historians-some-perspectives/
  7. My sister is drinking alcohol and hugging men

    Wa alaikum assalam Islam instilled family values and gave security to the people. Thus, with Islam, there is no longer a "need" to drink in order to relieve unhappiness and stress by slipping into a fantasy world. Give here advice/nasiha privately. The fear of God helps Muslims keep away from not only alcohol, but all other evils prohibited by the Qur'an, such as adultery, abuse and gambling. Peer pressure (sistererhood) also helps Muslims abstain from these sins. Islam is very clear on the topic of extra-marital affairs, and considers it as one of the major sins. It is important to note in this instance that Islamic teachings are often preventive in nature so “chances” that a person may become vulnerable to the temptation of one sin or another are excluded. In The Qur’an in (Surah 17, al Isra,, verse 32), Allah says: Do not go near adultery, .surely it is an indecency, and an evil way [of fulfilling sexual urge]. (17:32) Please note that extra-marital affairs may not involve any sex. It could be an emotional affair via the internet, and that may itself be equally problematic and dangerous. Have a look here: https://www.quranandscience.com/featured-articles/341-alcohol-in-islam http://aboutislam.net/shariah/shariah-and-humanity/shariah-and-life/premarital-relationships-why-not-2/
  8. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    There are certain action points we can achieve in both the short term and long term. They are as follows: Short term 1. What has happened and what this means for Jerusalem, Palestine, and the Muslim world. The formal Judaisation of Jerusalem and ‘legalising’ the change of the status quo of Masjid al-Aqsa. This will lead to granting Israelis full control over al-Aqsa and other religious places in the city. This poses a real threat to al-Aqsa. It might encourage other countries to follow the footsteps of the US. 2. The importance of Jerusalem from the Qur’ān and Sunnah and its relationship and link with al-Masjid al-Harām. 3. State the problem; that people have forgotten it and neglected it as a political problem or a nationalistic one. The current state of Palestine and the recent announcement as regards Jerusalem is a result of the weakness of the Muslim Ummah. 4. The inaction of the leaders puts the requirement on the lay to act; each Muslim according to their means. As we are told by the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam), “Whoever of you sees an evil must then change it with his hand. If he is not able to do so, then [he must change it ] with his tongue. And if he is not able to do so, then [he must change it] with his heart. And that is the weakest of īmān.”[2] There was no fourth option given to excuse the Muslims of inaction. Allāh (subḥānahu wa taʿālā) will not ask the average Muslim why they did not liberate Palestine or al-Aqsa but He will ask why they did not do what was in their capacity to raise awareness, apply pressure, and contribute to bring eventual change. 5. Offer advice as to what can be done by the layperson, and why. “And when a community among them said: “Why do you preach to a people whom Allāh is about to destroy or to punish with a severe torment?” (The preachers) said: “In order to be free from guilt before your Lord, and perhaps they may fear Allāh”.”[3] Allāh (subḥānahu wa taʿālā) looks at the input of each person and their personal moral responsibility, rather than outcome. https://www.islam21c.com/politics/al-quds-jerusalem-islamic-land-no-one-can-change-reality/
  9. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    Muslims are routinely accused of provoking conflicts with other peoples but the reality is clearly that they are only reacting to the provocation carried out by the likes of Trump and those before him. The real question is who is to blame? Palestine has been under occupation for over half a century and this announcement comes as no surprise to us, rather it is a reminder of the on-going occupation and loud call to the Ummah. The status of Al-Quds and Al-Aqsa are of the most critical issues of our time and a call for Muslims to wake up and stand up all over the world. This Ummah might have become weak yet it will never die, and now is the time we must urge one another to oppose this move with all the tools at our disposal. This illegal and bloody occupation has reached its zenith – and we must not let it succeed.
  10. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    Al-Quds, or Jerusalem, is an Islamic land All praise is to Allāh, and Salutations and prayers are upon the Messenger of Allāh (sall Allāhu ʿalayhī wa sallam) “Exalted is He who took His Servant by night from al-Masjid al-Haram to al-Masjid al- Aqsa, whose surroundings We have blessed, to show him of Our signs. Indeed, He is the Hearing, the Seeing.”[1] Historically the status of Al-Quds is the yardstick by which the Ummah’s strength is measured. When the Ummah was strong ʿUmar b. al-Khattāb opened it. When the Ummah became weak in the end of the 4th Hijri century it was occupied by the crusaders. When the Ummah became strong again Salāh al-Dīn al-Ayyūbī liberated it once again. And after the fall of the Ottoman Caliphate, it was occupied once again. And the Day of Judgement will not take place until the Ummah becomes strong again and liberates itself from occupation as the Prophet (sall Allāhu ʿalayhi wa sallam) informed us. Al-Quds has always been the icon or reference point which exposes the reality of the relationship between the three faiths of Divine scriptures; Islam, Christianity and Judaism. And, as a result, all three faiths have always had interest in it and hence it is a place where major global conflicts will take place. Despite the emergence and violent imposition of secularism, the global status of Al-Quds is testament of the continuance and the presence of faith in people’s lives. https://www.islam21c.com/politics/al-quds-jerusalem-islamic-land-no-one-can-change-reality/
  11. Islam in Spain - Espenia

    Indeed, Europe’s creative energies and inventiveness are acknowledged much later, only from the dawn of the “scientific revolution” in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. A good example that is characteristic of this era is that of the astronomer Galileo. In 1610 he published a work which promoted heliocentrism, which is the idea that the Earth and planets revolve around a relatively stationary Sun at the centre of the Solar System. Today science has confirmed that this model of the universe is correct, however at that time it conflicted with the prevailing theological belief that the Earth was the centre of the universe and that all heavenly bodies revolved around the Earth, known as geocentrism, a view which the Catholic Church held due to its literal interpretation of the Bible. Galileo’s discoveries were met with opposition within the Catholic Church, and in 1616 the Church formally declared heliocentrism to be heretical. Heliocentric books were banned and Galileo was ordered to refrain from holding, teaching or defending heliocentric ideas. Later the Church found him “gravely suspect of heresy”, sentencing him to indefinite imprisonment. Galileo was kept under house arrest until his death in 1642. This intellectual slumber of Europe is in stark contrast to the Islamic world. The coming of the Qur’an in the seventh century not only transformed Arabia but also the lands that were under the control of the Muslims. The peace and sense of security that Islamic rule brought about consequently produced one of the most successful civilisations in the history of the world. While Europe was in the Dark Ages it was the Muslims that produced some of the best known scholars and work. Victor Robinson, a historian of science, eloquently summed up the contrast between medieval Europe and Islamic Spain: “Europe was darkened at sunset, Cordova shone with public lamps; Europe was dirty, Cordova built a thousand baths; Europe was covered with vermin, Cordova changed its undergarments daily; Europe lay in mud, Cordova’s streets were paved; Europe’s palaces had smoke-holes in the ceiling, Cordova’s arabesques were exquisite; Europe’s nobility could not sign its name, Cordova’s children went to school; Europe’s monks could not read the baptismal service, Cordova’s teachers created a library of Alexandrian dimensions.”
  12. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    Revitalization of the City Umar immediately set about making the city an important Muslim landmark. He cleared the area of the Temple Mount, where Muhammad ﷺ ascended to heaven from. The Christians had used the area as a garbage dump to offend the Jews, and Umar and his army (along with some Jews) personally cleaned it and built a mosque – Masjid al-Aqsa – there. Throughout the remainder of Umar’s caliphate and into the Umayyad Empire’s reign over the city, Jerusalem became a major center of religious pilgrimage and trade. The Dome of the Rock was added to complement Masjid al-Aqsa in 691. Numerous other mosques and public institutions were soon established throughout the city. The Muslim conquest of Jerusalem under the caliph Umar in 637 was clearly an important moment in the city’s history. For the next 462 years, it would be ruled by Muslims, with religious freedom for minorities protected according to the Treaty of Umar. Even today, as fighting continues over the future status of the city, many Muslims, Christians, and Jews insist that the Treaty maintains legal standing and look to it to help solve Jerusalem’s current problems.
  13. This book is an English translation of as-Sirat an-Nabawiyyah; a scholarly and thoroughly researched Arabic work of Shaykh Abul-Hasan Ali Nadwi (May Allahs Mercy be upon him). However the title has been taken from the Urdu translation of the said work. In this book, the author has been particularly mindful of the current generation's mindset, taste, understanding and sensibilities. Similarly, he has been entirely considerate of the modern method of research and discourse, so that the content, evidences and style prove to be effective. In preparing the book, the author has read old and new literature, in Arabic and other languages; so that the book, in addition to being comprehensive, is also able to dispel any confusion that exists in the modern mind. As a result, this book has received much acclaim, and within a short space of time it has been included in the syllabus of universities. Now, the English version of this book is in your hands, so that English speakers may also benefit. Read Online Version 1 Download Version 1 [11.8 MB]
  14. Jerusalem - Al-Quds

    The Treaty of Umar As they did with all other cities they conquered, the Muslims had to write up a treaty detailing the rights and privileges regarding the conquered people and the Muslims in Jerusalem. This treaty was signed by Umar and Patriarch Sophronius, along with some of the generals of the Muslim armies. The text of the treaty read: In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate. This is the assurance of safety which the servant of God, Umar, the Commander of the Faithful, has given to the people of Jerusalem. He has given them an assurance of safety for themselves for their property, their churches, their crosses, the sick and healthy of the city and for all the rituals which belong to their religion. Their churches will not be inhabited by Muslims and will not be destroyed. Neither they, nor the land on which they stand, nor their cross, nor their property will be damaged. They will not be forcibly converted. No Jew will live with them in Jerusalem. The people of Jerusalem must pay the taxes like the people of other cities and must expel the Byzantines and the robbers. Those of the people of Jerusalem who want to leave with the Byzantines, take their property and abandon their churches and crosses will be safe until they reach their place of refuge. The villagers may remain in the city if they wish but must pay taxes like the citizens. Those who wish may go with the Byzantines and those who wish may return to their families. Nothing is to be taken from them before their harvest is reaped. If they pay their taxes according to their obligations, then the conditions laid out in this letter are under the covenant of God, are the responsibility of His Prophet, of the caliphs and of the faithful. – Quoted in The Great Arab Conquests, from Tarikh Tabari At the time, this was by far one of the most progressive treaties in history. For comparison, just 23 years earlier when Jerusalem was conquered by the Persians from the Byzantines, a general massacre was ordered. Another massacre ensued when Jerusalem was conquered by the Crusaders from the Muslims in 1099. The Treaty of Umar allowed the Christians of Jerusalem religious freedom, as is dictated in the Quran and the sayings of Muhammad ﷺ. This was one of the first and most significant guarantees of religious freedom in history. While there is a clause in the treaty regarding the banning of Jews from Jerusalem, its authenticity is debated. One of Umar’s guides in Jerusalem was a Jew named Kaab al-Ahbar. Umar further allowed Jews to worship on the Temple Mount and the Wailing Wall, while the Byzantines banned them from such activities. Thus, the authenticity of the clause regarding Jews is in question. What is not in question, however, was the significance of such a progressive and equitable surrender treaty, which protected minority rights. The treaty became the standard for Muslim-Christian relations throughout the former Byzantine Empire, with rights of conquered people being protected in all situations, and forced conversions never being a sanctioned act.
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