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  1. By Shaykh Muntasir Zaman Pause for a moment, and ask yourself: what are the greatest accomplishments of the Muslim civilization? At first thought, a number of things will probably come to mind, ranging from mathematics to medicine to architecture—perhaps even coffee.[1] But unfortunately we tend to overlook one of the greatest accomplishments, if not the greatest: the isnād system. That a person, till this day, can attribute a hadīth to the Prophet and then follow it with a list of authorities reaching back successively to the source is what scholars as early as Abū Bakr al-Thaqafī (d. 309 AH)[2] described as an exclusive accomplishment of the Muslim civilization.[3] The word sanad (lit. base)[4] refers to the chain of transmitters leading to the text of a hadīth while isnād refers to the mentioning of the chain.[5] Majority of scholars, however, use both terms interchangeably.[6] Al-Bukhārī (d. 256 AH), for instance, mentions, “Makkī ibn Ibrahīm—Yazīd ibn Abī ‘Ubayd Allāh—Salamah: I heard the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) say, ‘Whoever lies about me should prepare his abode in the fire.’”[7] In this example, the names leading to the text form the sanad of the hadith.[8] The usage of isnād began simultaneously with the transmission of the Prophet’s hadiths. Companions like Abū Salamah al-Makhzūmī (d. 3 AH),[9] and Ja‘far ibn Abī Tālib (d. 8 AH),[10]who passed away during the Prophet’s lifetime,[11] transmitted hadiths citing the Prophet as their source.[12] Furthermore, Companions who were preoccupied with their daily responsibilities would take turns to attend the gathering of the Prophet. When the present partner would relate the day’s teachings to the absent partner, he would obviously preface his words with “The Prophet said so and so.”[13] The shortness of the chain­, i.e. direct transmission from the Prophet, makes this first rudimentary usage of isnād unnoticeable. During this time, transmitters were not required to disclose their sources. That is why we find Companions like Anas ibn Mālik, who lived during the Medinan period, relate incidents from the Meccan period without citing their sources.[14] This was not an issue because even the thought of lying about the Prophet was inconceivable to the Companions.[15] Shortly after the Prophet’s demise, the Companions exercised caution vis-à-vis hadiths,[16] with Abū Bakr spearheading the initiative.[17] When al-Mughīrah ibn Shu‘bah narrated a hadith about a grandmother’s share of inheritance, Abū Bakr asked for corroboration, which Muhammad ibn Maslamah duly provided.[18] ‘Umar ibn al-Khattāb also asked Abū Mūsā al-Ash‘arī for corroboration when he narrated the hadith about seeking permission thrice for entering a person’s house; in this case, Abū Sa‘īd al-Khudrī stood in his support.[19] The assassination of ‘Uthmān ibn ‘Affān (Allāh be pleased with him) in 35 AH, later described as the strife (Fitnah), marks a major shift in the course of Islamic history.[20] Until the events that led to the tragic incident, there was considerable stability throughout the Muslim world.[21]Driven by a thirst to bolster their political and theological views,[22] people thereafter began to fabricate hadiths, which prompted scholars to exercise even further caution. Recounting this delicate phase, Ibn Sīrīn (d. 110 AH) explains, “In the early period, no one would ask about isnād. But when the strife[23] occurred people would say, “Name for us your sources.”[24] It is understood from Ibn Sīrīn’s words that the practice of citing one’s source, or isnād, for a hadīth existed before the Fitnah, but was not a requirement—it was within the discretion of a transmitter.[25] During the first century AH, the isnād system had fully developed and formed part and parcel of the transmission of hadiths.[26] Until a hadith was supported by an isnād, it held no weight in the sight of Hadīth scholars.[27] In this respect, ‘Abd Allah ibn al-Mubārak (d. 181 AH) made the proverbial remark, “Isnād is part of religion. Were it not for isnād, a person could say whatever he wanted. If you ask him, ‘Who told you this?’ He cannot reply.”[28] Sufyān al-Thawrī (d. 161 AH) said, “Isnād is the weapon of a believer. When he is not equipped with his weapon, how will he combat?”[29] The emphasis scholars placed on isnād in the field of Hadīth had rippling effects on other disciplines, like Qur’ānic exegesis, jurisprudence, history, and poetry. The leading exegete, Ibn Jarīr al-Tabarī (d. 310 AH), for instance, when quoting an opinion on the commentary of a verse, couples it with a chain of transmission that traces back to the source.[30] The extent this emphasis permeated even the most mundane subjects is at times unbelievable. A collection of stories about love entitled “Masāri‘ al-‘Ushshāq” where the author, Abū Muhammad al-Sarrāj (d. 500 AH), painstakingly cites lengthy chains of transmission is a case in point.[31] An argument has been put forward for the usage of isnād before the advent of Islām, in an attempt to negate the notion that it is an exclusively Islāmic accomplishment. To this end, examples are adduced from pre-Islāmic poetry,[32] Jewish scripture[33] and Hindu literature.[34]These examples, however, are not substantive; there is a stark contrast between the isnāds employed in these examples and how Muslims used isnāds. The fifth century Andalusian polymath, Ibn Hazm (d. 456 AH), explains what is meant by the exclusivity of isnād among Muslims.[35] From six forms of transmission, he writes, three are exclusive to Muslims. The third form deserves particular attention, “Transmission from the Prophet via reliable narrators, each disclosing the name and lineage of the informant, and each of known status, person, time, and place.”[36] More simply put, Muslims may not have been the first to use isnād per se—for argument’s sake—but they were definitely the first to give it value by providing unbroken chains and documenting detailed accounts of the narrators, better known as the field of al-Jarh wa al-Ta‘dīl (accreditation and criticism). After all, what use is a list of narrators when nothing is known about them save their names? The Muslim civilization is truly unrivalled in its documentation of the biographical information of Hadīth transmitters. Aloys Sprenger (d. 1893 CE), the celebrated Western academic and critic of Islam, could not help but acknowledge this unparalleled accomplishment. He writes: The glory of the literature of the Mohammedans is its literary biography. There is no nation, nor has there been any which like them has during twelve centuries recorded the life of every man of letters. If the biographical records of the Musalmans were collected, we should probably have accounts of the lives of half a million of distinguished persons, and it would be found that there is not a decennium of their history, nor a place of importance which has not its representatives.[37] Before concluding, it will be beneficial to address two issues. First, as the science of Hadīth developed, a hadīth was identified with its isnād and not its text (matn). [38] The growth of isnāds was a natural outcome of transmission: assuming one Companion imparted a hadith to five students who in turn did the same, etcetera, the number of routes would have increased exponentially. Through the process of transmission, therefore, the number of isnāds multiplied without an increase in the number of texts.[39] Consequently, when ‘Abd al-Rahmān ibn Mahdī said, “I know thirteen hadīths via al-Mughīrah ibn Shu‘bah from the Prophet regarding wiping on the socks,”[40] he was referring to a single text transmitted through thirteen different channels.[41] Keeping this technicality in mind will allow us to understand what scholars meant when they described the staggering number of hadīths they knew, such as al-Bukhārī’s memorization of one-hundred thousand authentic hadiths[42] or Ahmad ibn Hanbal’s compilation of his Musnad from a pool of seven-hundred thousand hadīths.[43] Furthermore, apart from Prophetic hadiths, included in these large numbers are the statements of the Companions and Successors.[44] Second, simply citing a chain of transmission for a report, be it a hadith or otherwise, does not necessitate its authenticity. This is more so in the case of books like Ibn Jarīr al-Tabarī’s Tārīkh al-Umam wa al-Mulūk—a primary source for subsequent historians—where the author gathers all available reports as transmitted to him and then consigns the responsibility of analyzing the chains of transmission to the reader.[45] But at the same time, it should be remembered that the isnād system, as Anwar Shāh al-Kashmīrī (d. 1933 CE) would often remind his students, was formally instituted to prevent the inclusion of extra-Islamic material, not to remove established Islamic teachings.[46] https://www.darultahqiq.com/isnad-system-unbroken-link-prophet/ [1] See: 1001 Inventions: Muslim Heritage in Our World, pp.12, 64, 198. [2] Al-Baghdādī, Sharaf Ashāb al-Hadīth, p.40. On the identity of Abū Bakr al-Thaqafī, see: Abū Ghuddah, al-Isnād min al-Dīn, p.23. Al-Thaqafī relates the idea of exclusivity from an earlier unidentified source. Muhammad ibn Hātim ibn al-Mufażaffar and Abū Tālib al-Makkī (d. 386 AH) have made similar remarks [al-Baghdādī, Sharaf Ashāb al-Hadīth, p.40; al-Makkī, Qūt al-Qulūb, vol.1, p.385]. I have yet to locate Muhammad ibn Hātim’s exact date of demise. Thus far, the following is some available data: (1) he reportedly narrates from Yahyā ibn Ma‘īn (d. 233 AH) [al-Bayhaqī, Shu‘ab al-mān, vol.4, p.362]; (2) Abū al-‘Abbās al-Daghūlī (d. 325 AH) [Al-Baghdādī, Sharaf Ashāb al-Hadīth, p.40] and Halīm ibn Dāwūd al-Kashshī (d. 357 AH) [Ibn Mākūlā, al-Ikmāl, vol.2, p.492] narrate from him. [3] Ibn Hibbān, al-Majrūhīn, vol.1 p.30; al-Hākim, al-Mustadrak ‘alā al-Sahīhayn, vol.1, p.41; al-Kattānī, Fahras al-Fahāris, vol.1, p.80. [4] Ibn Jamā‘ah, al-Manhal al-Rawī, p.30. There are three possible linguistic origins for the term sanad: elevation/raise, base/authority, and harshness/strength. See: al-Jawnfūrī, Nawādir al-Hadīth, p.37. [5] Al-Thanawī, Kashfshāf Istilihāt al-Funūn wa al-‘Ulūm, p.984; Abū Ghuddah, al-Isnād min al-Dīn, p.14. [6] Ibn al-‘Ajamī, Hashiyah ‘alā Tadrīb al-Rāwī, vol.3, p.89. For more on both terms, see: al-Suyūtī, Tadrīb al-Rāwī [with editor’s footnotes], vol.2, pp.31-33; al-Qārī, Sharh Sharh al-Nukhbah, pp.159-160; al-Jawnfūrī, Nawādir al-Hadīth, pp.37-38; Tāriq ibn ‘Awad Allāh, Sharh Lughat al-Muhaddith, pp.62-63. Be it as it may, as Shams al-Dīn al-Sakhāwi (d. 902 AH) explains, this is a flexible matter. See: al-Sakhāwī, Fath al-Mughīth, vol.1, p.23. [7] Al-Bukhārī, al-Jāmi‘ al-Musnad al-Sahīh, vol.1 p.33. [8] Abū Ghuddah, al-Isnād min al-Dīn, p.14. [9] Al-Tirmidhī, al-Sunan, vol.5, p.414; cf. al-Mizzī, Tuhfat al-Ashrāf, no.6577. [10] Ahmad, al-Musnad, vol.3, p.262; cf. Ibn Hajar, Ithāf al-Maharah, vol.4, p.75/Itrāf al-Musnid al-Mu‘talī, vol.2, p.208. [11] In Tadrīb al-Rāwī, Jalāl al-Dīn al-Suyūtī dedicated chapter 92 to the hadiths of those Companions who passed away during the Prophet’s lifetime. See: al-Suyūtī, Tadrīb al-Rāwī, vol.5, pp.635-636. He is said to have also authored a book on the subject. See: Hājī Khalīfah, Kashf al-Zunūn, vol.2, p.1683. [12] Fallātah, al-Wad‘ fī al-Hadīth, vol.2, pp.15-19. [13] See, for instance, al-Bukhārī, al-Jāmi‘ al-Musnad al-Sahīh, vol.1, p.29; al-A‘żamī, On Schacht’s Origins of Muhammadan Jurisprudence, p.155. [14] Fallātah, al-Wad‘ fī al-Hadīth, vol.2, p.19. [15] Al-Barā’ ibn ‘Āzib said, “We did not hear from the Prophet everything we narrate from him directly. We heard from him, and our companions would also narrate to us [from him]. But we would not lie.” See: Ahmad, al-‘Ilal wa Ma‘rifat al-Rijāl, vol.2, p.410. Anas ibn Mālik said, “By Allah, we would not lie. We did not know what lying was.” See: al-Fasawī, al-Ma‘rifah wa al-Tārīkh, vol.2, pp.633-634. For a study of the alleged reports of fabrication during the Prophet’s lifetime, see: Abū Ghuddah, Lamahat, pp.56-65. [16] On the report of ‘Alī ibn Abī Tālib taking an oath from a narrator before accepting his hadiths, see: al-Bukhārī, al-Tārīkh al-Kabīr, vol.2, p.54. [17] Al-Dhahabī, Tadhkirat al-Huffāż, vol.1, p.9. [18] Al-Tirmidhī, al-Sunan, vol.3, p.491. [19] Mālik, al-Muwatta’, vol.5, p.1403. For an important clarification on these and other similar reports, see: al-Suyūtī, Tadrīb al-Rāwī, vo.2, p.188; al-Sibā‘ī, al-Sunnāh wa Makānatuhā fī al-Tashrī‘ al-Islāmī, pp.85-89. [20] Abū Ghuddah, Lamahāt, p.73. [21] See: Mullā Khātir, Bid‘at Da‘wā al-I‘timād ‘alā al-Kitāb Dūn al-Sunnāh, p.18. [22] Mustafā al-Sibā‘ī enumerates seven factors that prompted the fabrication of hadīths. See: al-Sibā‘ī, al-Sunnah wa Makānatuhā fī al-Tashrī‘ al-Islāmī, pp.96-105. [23] There is considerable debate on the interpretation of ‘Fitnah’ in the words of Ibn Sīrīn. Some scholars opine that it refers to the assassination of ‘Uthmān ibn ‘Affān. See: Abū Ghuddah, Lamahāt, p.73. Based on a statement of Ibrāhim al-Nakha‘ī that people only began asking for isnād during the era al-Mukhtār ibn Abī ‘Ubayd al-Thaqafī (d. 67 AH), some argue for a later date. See: Ahmad, al-‘Ilal wa Ma‘rifat al-Rijāl, vol.3, p.380. With variations on the specific date, many contemporary scholars agree that fabrication began around the year 40 AH. Mujīr al-Khatīb explains that sparks of fabrication began during the period of the Successors when the first wave of trials and innovations surfaced; thus, leaving the date abstract so as to include the various opinions is more preferable. See: al-Hasanī, Ma‘rifat Madār al-Isnād, vol.1, p.385. For a study of Orientalist views on the date of the origins of isnād, see: al-A‘żamī, Studies In Early Hadīth Literature, pp.216-217/On Schacht’s Origins of Muhammadan Jurisprudence, pp.166-168; Siddiqi, Hadīth Literature: Its Origins Development and Special Features, pp.79-80. [24] Muslim, Introduction to his Sahīh, p.11. [25] Al-A‘żamī, Studies In Early Hadīth Literature, p.217. [26] Ibid., p.213. [27] See: Abū Ghuddah, Lamahāt, p.145. Despite the weakness of a hadith’s chain of transmission, scholars at times would authenticate its contents due to external factors, like inherited practice. For more on this, see: al-Kawtharī, al-Maqālāt, pp.75-78; Abū Ghuddah, al-Ajwibah al-Fādilah, p.228 f.; Brown, Did the Prophet Say It or Not? The Literal, Historical, and Effective Truth of Hadīths in Early Sunnism, p.277; also see Haydar Hasan’s treatise in: al-Nu‘mānī, al-Imām Ibn Mājah wa Kitābuhū al-Sunan, pp.86-90. This brings to mind the priceless observation of Anwar Shāh al-Kashmīrī, “It [Ibn Hajar al-‘Asqalānī’s judgment] is premised only on rules while al-Tirmidhī’s assessment is based on sense and sound intuition, and, truly, this is knowledge. And [rigid] rules are a blind man’s walking stick.” See: al-Kashmīrī, Fayd al-Bārī, vol.6, p.216/vol.4, p.130. But in the same breath, another piece of advice should not escape our attention, “Do not be like the one to whom it is said: you remembered one thing, but you forgot many things.” See: Ibid. [al-Mīrathī, al-Badr al-Sārī], vol.4, p.130. [28] Muslim, Introduction to his Sahīh, p.11. [29] Al-Baghdādī, Sharaf Ashāb al-Hadīth, p.42 [30] Abū Ghuddah, Lamahāt, pp.143-145. [31] See: al-Sarrāj, Masāri‘ al-‘Ushshāq; Siddique, Hadīth Literature, p.84. Scholars like al-Jāhiz (235 AH), Abū al-Faraj al-Asfahānī (d. 356 AH), and Ibn al-Jawzī (d. 597 AH) even cite isnāds for light hearted anecdotes. See: al-A‘żamī, On Schacht’s Origins of Muhammadan Jurisprudence, p.154. [32] Al-Asad, Masādir al-Shi‘r al-Jāhilī, pp.255 f.; al-A‘żamī, Studies In Early Hadīth Literature, p.212. Schoeler negates the possibility of isnāds being used by pre-Islāmic poets. See: Cook, The Opponents of the Writing of Tradition in Early Islam, pp.511-512. [33] Horovits, Alter Und Ursprung des Isnad, Der Islam, VIII, pp.39-47; Cook, The Opponents of the Writing of Tradition in Early Islam, pp.510– 512. Horovits did not provide evidence to show that these chains were not later fabrications. He does, however, write, “In the Talmudic literature, there is no idea of a chronological method, and the oldest extant work attempting such an arrangement was composed after 885 AD—more than a century later than the earliest Islamic work on isnād-critique. From this fact, and from the fact that the important Jewish works had been composed in the Islamic dominions, it may be inferred that the historical interest was due to the Islamic influence [emphasis mine].” See: Horovits, Alter, p.47; Siddiqi, Hadīth Literature, p.81, 150. [34] See: Siddiqi, Hadīth Literature, pp.78-79, 81. [35] Ibn Hazm, al-Fisal, vol.2, pp.67-70. [36] Ibid. [37] Sprenger, A Biographical Dictionary of Persons Who Knew Mohammad, vol.1, p.1. There is a degree of exaggeration in these figures, but there is no doubt that the Muslim civilization is peerless in this accomplishment. See: Abū Ghuddah, Lamahāt, p.163. [38] Abbott, Studies in Arabic Literary Papyri II, p.66; Brown, Hadīth, p.219. [39] It is difficult to determine the exact number of individual hadiths. Nevertheless, Sālih Ahmad al-Shāmī gathered the hadiths of 14 major Hadīth compilations: the six canonical books, Muwatta’ Mālik, Musnad Ahmad, the Sunans of al-Dārimī and al-Bayhaqī, the Sahīhs of Ibn Khuzaymah and Ibn Hibbān, al-Mustadrak of al-Hākim, and al-Mukhtārah of al-Diyā’ al-Maqdisī. In total, he gathered 114,194 hadīths, and after removing repetitions, there remained 28,430 hadīths. It should be noted that he did not regard the narration of two different Companions for an identical hadith as a repetition. See: al-Shāmī, Ma‘ālim al-Sunnah al-Nabawiyyah, p.9. [40] Al-Rāzī, al-Jarh wa al-Ta‘dīl, vol.1, p.261 [41] al-A‘żamī, Studies In Early Hadīth Literature, p.302. [42] Al-Baghdādī, Tārīkh Baghdād, vol.2, p.340. [43] Abū Musā, Khasā’is al-Musnad, p.21. [44] Shākir, Footnotes on Khasā’is al-Musnad, p.21; Abū Ghuddah, Footnotes on Mabādī’ ‘Ilm al-Hadīth wa Usūluh, p.55; al-A‘żamī, Studies In Early Hadīth Literature, p.303. [45] See: al-Tabarī, Tārīkh al-Umam wa al-Mulūk, vol.1, pp. 7-8; al-Kawtharī, al-Maqālāt, p.404. Ibn Hajar writes, “Most Hadīth scholars of the past—from 200 AH onwards—believed that citing a hadith with its chain of transmission absolved them of the responsibility [of analyzing it].” See: Ibn Hajar, Lisān al-Mīzān, vol.4 p.125; cf. ‘Awwāmah, Footnotes on Tadrīb al-Rāwī, vol.3, pp.519-520. Zayn al-Dīn al-‘Irāqī explains that although citing a hadith alongside its problematic chain without expounding on its defects is reprehensible, to do so without citing its chain at all is worse. See: al-‘Irāqī, Sharh al-Tabsirah wa al-Tadhkirah, vol.1, p.313; Brown, Did the Prophet Say It or Not? The Literal, Historical, and Effective Truth of Hadīths in Early Sunnism, pp.281-282. [46] Abū Ghuddah, al-Ajwibah al-Fādilah, p.238.
  2. Sikh's And Hindu's

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5419017/
  3. Sikh's And Hindu's

    Scientists found that hindu men believe rape is okay because the hindu gods were also rapists, and hindu men "strive to emulate the gods" https://jstor.org/stable/26671430 -70% of hindu men believed a rapist is not a criminal https://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/P
  4. Miracles of Quran

    Have a look https://islamic-life-forum.blogspot.com/2014/08/the-7-ahruf-10-qiraat-of-quran.html
  5. Miracles of Quran

    Secondly, Quran simply states the fact that i.e If human were the author of the Quran, you would find much Ikhtilaf which linguistically signifies; "The disagreeing, differing, or varying, in state or condition or quality, &c.; being dissimilar, different, diverse, various, incongruous, discordant, or dissentient:] اختلف is the contr. of اِتَّفَقَ; (Ḳ, TA;) and is said of anything that is dissimilar [in the parts or members, &c. of which it is composed]; as alsoتخالف↓. (TA.) You say,تخالف↓ الأَمْرَانِ [and اختلف الامران], i. e. لَمْ يَتَّفِقَا [The two things, or affairs, or cases, were, or became, dissimilar,, &c.]. (TA.) And اختلفوا andتخالفوا↓ (Mgh, Mṣb) [They disagreed,, &c., فِى أَمْرٍ in a thing or an affair or a case;] every one of them took to, or held, a way, or an opinion, different from, or contrary to, that of another: (Mṣb:) both signify the same. (Mgh.) It is said in a trad., سَوُّوا صُفُوفَكُمْ وَلَا تَخْتَلِفُوا فَتَخْتَلِفَ قُلُوبُكُمْ [Make ye your ranks even when ye place yourselves to pray together, and be not dissimilar in your positions, for in that case your hearts would disagree]; meaning, when one of you advances, or stands, before another in the ranks, your hearts will be affected, and disagreement in respect of friendship and amity will arise among you: or, as some say, it means, your hearts will be made to recoil: or the صُورَة [or specific character] of your hearts will become changed into another صورة. (TA.) [Hence,] اِخْتَلَفَتْ عَنْ أَنْوَائِهَا, said of stars: see 4, near the middle of the paragraph. Also The being complicated, intricate, or confused. (KL.) [You say, اختلف الأَمْرُ بَيْنَهُمْ The affair, or case, was, or became, complicated, intricate, or confused, so as to be a subject of disagreement, or difference, between them: a phrase of frequent occurrence.]"
  6. Miracles of Quran

    The Miracle of the Quran for non-Arabs ! By karkooshy One of the proofs for the prophethood of Muhammed ﷺ is the Quran, which is an imitable literary miracle of unrivaled eloquence. However, the miraculousness of the Quran is very difficult to realize for someone who is not specialized in Arabic, never mind someone who does not speak Arabic at all! Such a person would not be qualified to judge the literary quality of the Quran, nor be able compare it with other literature in order to determine its imitability. Fortunately, there are ways around this problem. One can appreciate the miraculousness of the Quran, even if one does not speak Arabic, by considering the following three facts: First: the Quran challenges Prophet Muhammed’s opponents (the pagan Arabs) to disprove its miraculousness, by getting together and producing a chapter that rivals the eloquence of any of its chapters: وَإِن كُنتُمْ فِي رَيْبٍ مِّمَّا نَزَّلْنَا عَلَىٰ عَبْدِنَا فَأْتُوا بِسُورَةٍ مِّن مِّثْلِهِ وَادْعُوا شُهَدَاءَكُم مِّن دُونِ اللَّهِ إِن كُنتُمْ صَادِقِينَ And if you doubt about what We have revealed to Our slave, roduce a chapter like it, and call upon your supporters other than Allah, if you are truthful[1]. Second: The pagan Arabs were expert poets. Likely, the best in the Arabic language in all of history. To this day, Arabic linguists use pre-Islamic as a template for grammatical and linguistic rules. This is proof that Prophet Muhammed’s opponents were competent, and that it is nomically necessary for them to have been able to meet the Quranic challenge. Third: Prophet Muhammed’s opponents were heavily invested in destroying Islam, and disproving his prophethood. The pagan Arabs imprisoned, tortured, and killed many of the early Muslims. They even engaged in wars against Prophet Muhammed ﷺ and his community. Wars where those pagans spent much time, much money, and risked their very lives, in order to stop the spread of Islam. With the above in mind, we argue: If a claimant to prophethood is aided by a negation of nomic necessity, then he is a true prophet. Muhammed ﷺ is a claimant to prophet who was aided by a negation of nomic necessity. Therefore, Muhammed ﷺ is a true prophet. As for the first premise, it is true because God is the creator of normalcy. So His aiding a claimant to prophethood by negating normalcy for him, signals His support for this claimant. More on this here. As for the second premise- Muhammed ﷺ is a claimant to prophethood who was aided by a negation of nomic necessity- this is actualized in the pagan Arabs’ inability to address the Quranic challenge. For if the pagan Arabs were able to fulfill the Quranic challenge, and given their extreme desire to destroy Islam, they would have spared themselves the time, money, and the risks of death in battle, and they would have simply cooperated with one another in order to produce a text which rivaled the Quran literarily. But they did not, and Islam ultimately prevailed[2]. Thus, the Quran resulted in a negation of nomic necessity. Namely, the inability of the pagans to address its challenge, when they should have been able to do so. To make the above clearer, Imam Al-Baqilani[2] compares the failure of the pagans in addressing the Quranic challenge, to a prophet who challenges his opponents to move their hands, when God prevents them from this act for the timeframe of the prophet’s challenge. This is a negation of nomic necessity for those people, and proof for this prophet’s prophethood. Likewise, God preventing the pagans from being able to address the Quranic challenge, is a negation of nomic necessity for them, and proof for Muhammed’s ﷺ prophethood. Therefore, Muhammed ﷺ is a true prophet. https://islamic-life-forum.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-miracle-of-quran-for-non-arabs.html
  7. Miracles of Quran

  8. Question: May a Jew enter a mosque or church when there is a need to do so or to visit there as a tourist attraction? Answer from Jewish site: http://halachayomit.co.il/en/default.aspx?HalachaID=2367 Answer: The great Rambam in his commentary on the Mishnah Masechet Avodah Zarah (Chapter One) deduces from the words of the Mishnah there regarding an actual house of idol worship “that we are almost forbidden to look at it, let alone enter it.” The words of the Rambam are quoted as Halacha by the Shach (Yoreh De’ah, Chapter 149) as well as the other Acharonim (ibid). The Tosafot in Masechet Avodah Zarah (17b) deduce from the Gemara (ibid.) that one must distance himself even from the entrance of a house of idol worship as much as possible. Similarly, Maran Ha’Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh De’ah (Chapter 150, Section 1) rules that there is a Mitzvah to distance one’s self four Amot (approximately 6.5 feet) from a path of idol worship. Thus, if one is walking close to a house of idol worship, such as a church, one should distance himself at least four Amot from the entrance to this place, for it is well-known that Christian churches are considered houses of idol worship as they believe in another deity besides for Hashem. If so, it is certainly forbidden to actually enter their churches, for they are actual houses of idol worship. The Evil Spirit Found in Houses of Idol Worship Besides for the halachic prohibition to enter a church, Hagaon Harav Chaim Palagi writes in his Responsa Chaim Be’Yad (Chapter 26) that when one enters a church, a spirit of heresy immediately cleaves to him; even if it does not cause one to sin, nevertheless, one impurifies himself just by entering such a place. This is especially true when the one who enters this place is a member of the holy Jewish nation to whom the forces of impurity cling strongly. One who enters a house of idol worship requires repentance and atonement for one’s sin. Based on this, it is clear that it is forbidden to enter a Christian church, for a church is a house of idol worship, as we have explained. The Practice of Maran Harav zt”l While Serving as a Rabbi in Egypt While Maran Rabbeinu Ovadia Yosef zt”l served as a Rabbi and Av Bet Din (head of the rabbinical court) in Egypt in the year 5708 (1948), he also served as Assistant Chief Rabbi of Egypt. The post of Chief Rabbi was held by a man by the name of Chaim Nachum Afandi who was close to the king of Egypt, a member of the Egyptian parliament in Cairo, and a member of the Academy of the Arabic Language, and was thus chosen for this position. During this period, a certain well-respected Christian diplomat passed away in Egypt and the government invited the country’s Chief Rabbi to represent the Chief Rabbinate and participate in the funeral services. Since the Chief Rabbi was in a weakened state, he requested that Maran zt”l attend the funeral in his place. When Maran zt”l heard that it was customary for all to file into the church where the deceased lay and listen to Christian prayers and the like, he notified the Chief Rabbi that under no circumstances would he agree to enter the church. The Chief Rabbi exerted much pressure on Maran zt”l to agree to go, for if no representative of the Chief Rabbinate would be present, this might cause a serious diplomatic incident to ensue. Nevertheless, Maran zt”l disagreed with his stance and claimed that, on the contrary, the participation of a rabbi at such an event is an unparalleled desecration of Hashem’s name and a disgrace of the Jewish religion in the eyes of the non-Jewish nations. He thus remained steadfast in his convictions and no representative of the Chief Rabbinate attended the funeral. Note: No fall-out ever resulted. Installing Air Conditioners in a Church Similarly, Maran zt”l was asked about an individual whose profession was installing air conditioning units who had just signed a large contract to install hundreds of air conditioners. Included in the deal was installing air conditioners in a church. He inquired whether he may continue his work or must he cancel the deal and as a result, incur a hefty financial loss as he would need to pay for penalties sustained. Maran zt”l answered that he may continue with his work on the condition that he himself would not enter the church; rather, his non-Jewish workers would have to install the air conditioners there. Maran zt”l added that he himself should not instruct the non-Jews to enter the church; rather, he should tell another non-Jew to hire him some non-Jewish workers and install the air conditioners. (He continues to provide copious sources for his view as is the practice of Maran zt”l. Unfortunately, we cannot discuss these reasons at length.) Entering a Muslim Mosque Regarding entering a mosque, the Rambam explains in one of his responses that Ishmaelites are not considered idol-worshippers since they believe in Hashem and there is no denial of Hashem in their religion or anything else that should cause them to be considered idol-worshippers. We are therefore lenient and sell our lands in Israel to Muslims during the Shemitta (Sabbatical) year based on the “Heter Mechira” process although it is forbidden to sell land in Eretz Yisrael to an idol-worshipper; this is because Muslims are not considered idol-worshippers. Based on this, mosques are not considered actual houses of idol worship and one may enter them according to the letter of the law. Summary: It is absolutely forbidden to enter a house of idol worship. Included in this prohibition is entering a Christian church or other kinds of houses of idol worship in the Far East. Nevertheless, there is no halachic prohibition to enter an Muslim mosque; this is especially true when this is being done in order to pray there, such as at the graves of our forefathers in the Machpela Cave in Hebron.
  9. God-rejector:"Show me God"

    Brother Hashim speaks to a visiting atheist about the understanding of this world and how a creator fits into it and how without one, life truly doesn't make sense.
  10. Salam alaikum How to make a playlist of the latest videos from your subscribed youtube channels? (Subscription playlist) 1- Open Google Chrome. 2- Open "Chrome web store" and search for "PocketTube: Youtube Subscription Manager". 3- Create your groups by topic and add your desired channels to each group : 4- Click subscriptions 5- "Play all" subscription new videos or choose a group to play its videos! For tutorial:
  11. "The Prophet is more worthy of the believers than themselves, and his wives are [in the position of] their mothers." (Qur'an, 33:6). In this series Sheikh Uthman Al Khamis presents mini biographies of the mothers of the believers, the wives of the Prophet ﷺ.
  12. Who is the Comforter ?

    Who is the comforter ?
  13. Racism & Christianity !

    The Bible is atleast in it’s complete form 700 years before the advent of African slavery, however Christians by and large (as demonstrated above) did in fact, use Bereishit (Genesis) 9:21-24 as a means of promoting slavery and distilling the gospel among the negro peoples: The bells of the Bristol churches pealed merrily on the news of the rejection by Parliament of Wilberforce’s bill for the abolition of the slave trade. The slave trader, John Newton, gave thanks in the Liverpool churches for the success of his last venture before his conversion and implored God’s blessing on his next. He established public worship twice every day on his slaver, officiating himself, and kept a day of fasting and prayer, not for the slaves but for the crew. “I never knew,” he confessed, “sweeter or more frequent hours of divine communion than in the last two voyages to Guinea.” – [Larimer, op. cit., 100. & S. H. Swinny, The Humanitarianism of the Eighteenth Century.] Many missionaries found it profitable to drive out Beelzebub by Beelzebub. According to the most recent English writer on the slave trade, they “considered that the best way in which to remedy abuse of negro slaves was to set the plantation owners a good example by keeping slaves and estates themselves, accomplishing in this practical manner the salvation of the planters and the advancement of their foundations.” The Moravian missionaries in the islands held slaves without hesitation; the Baptists, one historian writes with charming delicacy, would not allow their earlier missionaries to deprecate ownership of slaves.74 To the very end the Bishop of Exeter retained his 655 slaves, for whom he received over 12,700 compensation in 1833. Church historians make awkward apologies, that conscience awoke very slowly to the appreciation of the wrongs inflicted by slavery and that the defence of slavery by churchmen “simply arose from want of delicacy of moral perception.” – [ Mackenzie-Grieve, op. cit., 162., G. R. Wynne, The Church in Greater Britain (London, 1911), 120., H. of C. Sess. Pap., 1837-8, Vol. 48. The exact figure was 12,729.4.4 (pp. 19, 22)., Wynne, op. cit., 120; C. J. Abbey and J. H. Overton, The English Church in the Eighteenth Century (London, 1878), II, 107. and its results, in F. S. Marvin (ed.), Western Races and the World (Oxford, 1922), 130-131.] The very first person to propose enslaving Africans was a Christian. Christian priest, Bartholomew de la Casas, whom himself had slaves, proposed the use of Africans to ease the suffering of the slavery of the Amerindians. Roughly 1200 years before any of these figures existed, Muhammad (peace be upon him) commanded the freeing of slaves through the revelation of the Qur’aan: Indeed We have created man (to live) in hard struggle. Does he think that no one has power over him? He says, “I have spent a lot of wealth.” Does he think that no one has seen him? Did We not make for him two eyes, And one tongue and two lips, And showed him the two ways? Yet he did not make his way through the steep course, And what may let you know what the steep course is? It is freeing the neck of a slave. In fact the Qur’aan clearly details removing slavery: …..And those who seek a contract [for eventual emancipation] from among whom your right hands possess – then make a contract with them if you know there is within them goodness and give them from the wealth of Allah which He has given you. And do not compel your slave girls to prostitution, if they desire chastity, to seek [thereby] the temporary interests of worldly life. And if someone should compel them, then indeed, Allah is [to them], after their compulsion, Forgiving and Merciful. It was even the Muslims who compelled the British to remove slavery from being legal, they even did so themselves, leading by example in Morocco: Moorish envoy to England, in 1813, from Mulai Sulaiman, Emperor of Morocco (1794-1822), in whose reign Christian slavery was abolished in Morocco. His son Meïr Cohen Machim visited England in the same capacity in 1827.
  14. Racism & Christianity !

    By Omar Dunlap Racism in the Holy Book ? We can trace arguably some of the first racist theologies to the Bible itself. But, before tackling this issue, let me ask our Christian brethren, if I were to proclaim the white race as the holy race, is this racism? Would this be denounced as anti-Christian based on its ridiculous prejudice and racism? Would you bring a book into your house that was titled: "THE WHITE RACE IS THE HOLY RACE " and leave such a book on your coffee table for all to read? Racism is defined as The belief that race accounts for differences in human character or ability and that a particular race is superior to others. Now, if one race considers itself alone as holy, would this not be racism, by DEFINITION? The answer is, of course, YES, it is racism. As it turns out, the Israelite writers of the Old Testament have referred to themselves as the HOLY RACE: “They (the Jews) have taken some of their daughters as wives for themselves and their sons, and have mingled the holy race with the peoples around them. And the leaders and officials have led the way in this unfaithfulness.” (Ezra 9:2 NIV version) We have read 2 important things in this passage: 1. That the Bible discriminates racially, and that 2. Mingling the “Holy Race” with other peoples is forbidden (i.e., interracial marriage) My friends, this is where it all starts. The racism of the Jewish authors of the Old Testament. We begin to see why Terrorist Christians have developed the theology against interracial marriage and why racism is integrated into their faith.
  15. Dr. Yasir Qadhi explains in detail the History of Qur'an, Preservation, Compilation, Differences in Readings & Recitations(Hafs, Warsh, Qalun, Duri, Etc.) of the Arabic text of Qur'an and Disagreements among the students of Abdullah ibn Masud and Zaid Ibn Thabit on different Readings and Recitations. Exposing the Deceit Of Bigot Anti-Islamists & Cunning Christian Missionaries that Quran have many Versions.
  16. Proofs Of The Bible's Corruption

    Jeremiah 8:8? | by Ijaz Ahmed
  17. The honeycombs built by the bees are so regular and flawless that it is astonishing for tiny animals to exhibit such a perfect structure. All combs consist of very regular hexagons. What do you think the bees need to consider when building a hexagonal honeycomb? The honeycomb cells have a 13-degree slope, which prevents honey from flowing out. Each of the internal angles of the honeycomb cells is formed as 120 degrees. If the angle with the ground were arranged correctly but the inner angle were not arranged correctly, there would be disorders in the honeycomb. If the internal angles were calculated correctly but the slope with the ground were not calculated correctly, all the honey stored in the honeycomb would fall onto the ground. How do bees calculate this 13-degree slope and 120-degree internal angles of the honeycomb cells without using a T-square and a ruler? How do they achieve these precise values, which even an engineer would have difficulty in calculating? How do they build this flawless honeycomb construction, which surpasses even the most talented craftsmen, though they do not have a plan and a construction site supervisor directing them? How will those who do not explain a small insect’s becoming a mathematician like an engineer and then working as a skilled master, building such flawless combs by the verse “And thy Lord taught the Bee” (an-Nahl 68) explain it? The bee is a cause; the extraordinary work it does is an effect (result). Since the cause is simple and the effect is perfect, the cause cannot be the doer. The wonderful things this little insect does will make even the most stubborn minds accept that the Lord, who educates and teaches the bee, is behind the scene. For more detailed information, you can visit the websites below. www.questionsonislam.com www.windowsofislam.com
  18. Racism & Christianity !

    The Church also supported the slave trade. The Spaniards saw in it an opportunity of converting the heathen, and the Jesuits, Dominicans and Franciscans were heavily involved in sugar cultivation which meant slave-holding. The story is told of an old elder of the Church in Newport who would invariably, the Sunday following the arrival of a slaver from the coast, thank God “that another cargo of benighted beings had been brought to a land where they could have the benefit of a gospel dispensation.” – [R. Terry, Some Old Papers relating to the Newport Slave Trade (Bulletin of the Newport Historical Society, July, 1927), 10.] In fact, Christianity and the Negro slave trade had become so synonymous that famous British authors and writers were documenting their close cohesion within their societal framework: In 1750 Horace Walpole wrote scornfully of “the British Senate, that temple of liberty and the bulwark of Protestant Christianity,….pondering methods to make more effectual that horrid traffic of selling negroes. – [P. Cunningham (ed.), The Letters of Horace Walpole (London, 1891, II, 197. To Sir H. Mann, Feb. 25, 1750.)] ……..another Liverpool slave trader, Foster Cunliffe, contributed largely. He was a pioneer in the slave trade. he and his two sons are listed as members of the Liverpool Committee of Merchants trading to Africa in 1752. Together they had four ships capable of holding 1,120 slaves, the profits from which were sufficient to stock twelve vessels on the homeward journey with sugar and rum. An inscription to Foster Cunliffe in St. Peter’s Church describes him this: “a Christian devout and exemplary in the exercise of every private and publick duty, friend to mercy, patron to distress, an enemy only to vice and sloth, he lived esteemed by all who knew him….and died lamented by the wise and good….” – [For Cunliffe, see Bourne, op. cit., II, 57, Botsford, op. cit., 122; Enfield, op. cit.,43, 49; Donnan, op. cit., II, 492, 497.] Not only was this man praised by the Church for having the capability from one voyage to transfer 1, 120 slaves, he was praised for his service and deemed a friend to mercy, such to the extent this was inscribed on a Church! Unless Mr. Edwards has somehow developed amnesia, there is no excuse for his blatant disregard and misrepresentation of his faith when it’s this deeply related to slavery. https://callingchristians.com/tag/can-a-disciple-of-christ-be-racist/
  19. La Bible est plus violente que le Coran selon un logiciel d'analyse de texte ÉCRITURES – Un ingénieur développeur américain a utilisé son logiciel d'analyse de textes sur l'Ancien Testament, le Nouveau, et le Coran. Selon ses résultats, la Bible est légèrement plus portée sur la destruction et le meurtre que le livre de l'islam. "Le Coran est-il vraiment plus violent que la Bible ?" Tout est parti de cette question, que Tom Anderson, un ingénieur développeur de New-York s'est posée. En analysant la Bible complète et le Coran grâce à son logiciel comparatif, l'ingénieur en données informatiques s'est rendu compte que le livre chrétien contenait davantage d'allusions au "meurtre" et à la "destruction" que son homologue coranique. En janvier dernier, Tom Anderson a constaté que, dans les débats, les récents épisodes terroristes étaient souvent associés à un "islam fondamentaliste", qui serait un foyer de violences exploité par les extrémistes. Selon certains, le Coran encouragerait davantage les actes brutaux comparé aux autres textes religieux. Or "pour comprendre une religion, il est tout à fait logique de commencer par examiner sa littérature", pose l'ingénieur dans son étude . Et ça tombe bien, Tom Anderson a conçu un logiciel d'analyse, OdinText , destiné à aider les chercheurs dans leur étude de documents. L'outil scanne froidement le contenu d'une œuvre et révèle des tendances dans le vocabulaire utilisé, en fonction de mots-clés choisis : le nombre de fois où le mot a été utilisé, ses synonymes, les termes liés au même champs lexical, ou encore sa proximité avec les autres vocables recherchés. Sont donc passés sous l'œil mécanique du logiciel : l'Ancien Testament (dont les cinq premiers livres sont communs à la Torah, le livre sacré du judaïsme), le Nouveau Testament (associé à l'Ancien, il constitue la Bible chrétienne) et enfin le Coran (le livre sacré de l'islam). Pour comparer les trois livres, Tom Anderson a utilisé des repères autour des émotions humaines (et non, il ne s'agit pas d'un remake de Vice Versa) : la joie, l'attente, la colère, le dégoût, la tristesse, la surprise, la peur/l'anxiété et la confiance/croyance. OdinText a analysé 886.000 mots au total... le tout en deux minutes. Bible en "colère", Coran plein de "joie" Résultat de ce battle : la notion de "colère" est davantage utilisée dans la Bible (les deux Testaments) que dans le Coran, qui lui obtient un score plus élevé côté "joie" et "confiance/croyance", mais aussi pour ce qui est de la "peur/anxiété". La surprise, la tristesse et le dégoût se retrouvent à parts égales dans les deux textes, précise l'analyste. La Bible se défend toutefois grâce à "l'amour" présent à 3% dans le Nouveau Testament, à 1,9% dans l'Ancien, contre 1,26% dans le Coran. Mais la question demeure : la Coran est-il plus violent ? Le "meurtre" et la "destruction" constituent 2,1% du livre des musulmans, contre 2,8% du Nouveau Testament et pas moins de 5,3% de l'Ancien Testament, soit plus du double par rapport au Coran. En regardant le concept "d'ennemis", c'est encore le plus vieux des textes chrétiens qui bat le record. 1,8% de son contenu en fait mention, suivi du Coran (0,7%) et du Nouveau Testament (0,5%). Dans le Coran toutefois, l'ennemi est légèrement plus souvent un concept, comme le "Diable" ou le "mal" (0,2%), que dans le Nouveau Testament (0,1%). Le Coran évoque par ailleurs plus souvent "le pardon/la grâce" (6,3%) que les Nouveau (2,9%) et Ancien (0,7%) Testaments. Tom Anderson note toutefois que ce rapport est en partie dû à l’épithète "miséricordieux" fréquemment assorti au nom d' "Allah". "Certains pourraient exclure ce mot, considérant qu'il n'est qu'une étiquette ou un titre, mais nous pensons qu'il est signifiant, parce que la miséricorde a été préférée aux autres attributs comme 'tout-puissant'", nuance-t-il. Pour lui, il n'est pas question de prendre parti, et il reconnaît n'avoir "fait que gratter la surface". Il conclut toutefois : "Il semble juste d'en déduire que certains préjugés communément admis sur la perception de ces textes ne sont pas forcément porteurs de vérité". Ce qui nous donne furieusement envie de dire... amen. https://www.lci.fr/insolite/la-bible-est-plus-violente-que-le-coran-selon-un-logiciel-danalyse-de-texte-1503485.html
  20. Racism & Christianity !

    Slavery of the Unholy Races It is no doubt that when slavery was enacted in America, Christians used the Bible to justify this practice. In the 1800’s thousands of Africans were put into bondage, and worked for white Christians for no pay. The Christians, in defense of their belief of the ‘divine institution of slavery’ cited several passages from the Bible. This is impossible to ignore, indeed, it is a historical fact. In 1852 Jossiah Priest published a book called "Bible defence of slavery". The worldbook reference book, under the title “slavery” states: During the early 1800's, abolitionists started a crusade to end slavery. Southerners then began to defend slavery in what became known as the proslavery movement. Some Southerners in the movement argued that slavery reflected "the law of nature" that permitted the strong to rule the weak. Others insisted that the Bible supported slavery. Of course, at this time in America, slavery was a racial issue. The black slaves were forced into extremely harsh conditions, and this practice was defended, at the time, by the white Christian majority. Their defense was the Bible. But what does the Bible really say about racial slavery? Allowed or not? Let’s take a look: The UNHOLY RACES (non-Jews) can be slaves, but NOT the HOLY RACE: However, you may purchase male or female slaves from among the foreigners who live among you. You may also purchase the children of such resident foreigners, including those who have been born in your land. You may treat them as your property, passing them on to your children as a permanent inheritance. You may treat your slaves like this, but the people of Israel, your relatives, must never be treated this way. (Leviticus 25:44- 46) Furthermore, the practice of whipping slaves is condoned by the Bible as well: When a man strikes his male or female slave with a rod so hard that the slave dies under his hand, he shall be punished. If, however, the slave survives for a day or two, he is not to be punished, since the slave is his own property. (Exodus 21:20-21 NAB) In this law we see that beating a slave is ok unless the slave dies immediately, but if the death is not immediate, there is no harm done. The shocking treatment of African Slaves in the U.S. was clearly condoned by these passages. Jesus (SAAS) also clearly approves of the beating of slaves in the New Testament: The servant will be severely punished, for though he knew his duty, he refused to do it. "But people who are not aware that they are doing wrong will be punished only lightly. Much is required from those to whom much is given, and much more is required from those to whom much more is given." (Luke 12:47-48 NLT) Now after reviewing all of this material on the Christian terrorists/racists that exist, let us examine some other quotes we have mentioned in this document: “A relatively new tenet gaining popularity among some radical Christian Identity believers justifies the use of violence if it is perpetrated in order to punish violators of God's law, as found in the Bible and interpreted by Christian Identity ministers and adherents. This includes killing interracial couples, abortionists, prostitutes, and homosexuals.” Does the above sound like a far-fetched group of psychos, or a terrorist group based on strict interpretation of the Bible? Racist theology has today found itself powerful and influential voices. Of these, most prominent would be David Duke, former Ku Klux Klan leader, who was elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives. Duke proclaims that he has always been a believing Christian and that an integral part of his Christianity has been a theology of racial segregation. We read in his own work that in the name of race preservation, God has commanded genocide, segregation and anti-miscegenation, and today forbids racial intermarriage and the crossing of racial boundaries. Is this at all shocking coming from a proclaimed ‘Christian nation’ given what we have learned in this document? We see that the Bible promotes racism against all non-Jews and non-whites. It is crystal clear. We see that the Bible promotes genocide against foreign nations, and racial slavery, (including the whipping and beating of slaves.) Even the New Testament condones slavery (as seen in Ephesians 6:5 and 1 Timothy 6:1-2) We see that if what the Bible says about Jesus (saas) is true, then he considered anyone not of his race DOGS and the apostle Paul considered the non-Jew and the non-white a liar, wicked brute, and lazy glutton.
  21. Racism & Christianity !

    Rules of War: Non-Jews have 2 options, become SLAVES OR DIE: "As you approach a town to attack it, first offer its people terms for peace. If they accept your terms and open the gates to you, then all the people inside will serve you in forced labor. But if they refuse to make peace and prepare to fight, you must attack the town. When the LORD your God hands it over to you, kill every man in the town. But you may keep for yourselves all the women, children, livestock, and other plunder. You may enjoy the spoils of your enemies that the LORD your God has given you. (Duet 10-15) More Genocide: You must completely destroy the Hittites, Amorites, Canaanites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites, just as the LORD your God has commanded you. (Duet. 15-18) More Genocide: During this period, Joshua destroyed all the descendants of Anak, who lived in the hill country of Hebron, Debir, Anab, and the entire hill country of Judah and Israel. He killed them all and completely destroyed their towns. Not one was left in all the land of Israel, though some still remained in Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod. So Joshua took control of the entire land, just as the LORD had instructed Moses. He gave it to the people of Israel as their special possession, dividing the land among the tribes. So the land finally had rest from war. (Joshua 11:21-23) It now becomes clear that the terrorists from among the Christians have no problem with wiping out entire races, man, woman, and child with all the weapons of mass destruction stockpiled as their possessions, and that this belief they derive from the Bible alone. No outside sources, no brainwashing, just old fashion biblical adherence.
  22. Racism & Christianity !

    Genocide against the Unholy Races ? We now see where much of the racism of the 350,000 Christian terrorists in America comes from. The Bible. But what of their belief that it is ok to enact violence and terrorism, what of their belief in the use of weapons of mass destruction? Biblical? The answer, unfortunately, is YES. In the Old Testament we see the Jewish army, firm in their belief of being the Holy Race, marching from town to town, killing man, woman, and child: Murder and Rape of the inhabitants of Jabesh Gilead: "So they sent twelve thousand warriors to Jabesh-gilead with orders to kill everyone there, including women and children. "This is what you are to do," they said. "Completely destroy all the males and every woman who is not a virgin." Among the residents of Jabesh-gilead they found four hundred young virgins who had never slept with a man, and they brought them to the camp at Shiloh in the land of Canaan." (Judges 21:10-11)
  23. Racism & Christianity !

    Paul’s Racism We have seen that Paul wanted to open up what was clearly racist doctrines to apply to whites as well as Jews. But I implore the reader to not be misled, Paul was by no means free from racism. We read in Paul’s letter to Titus, the following: “A prophet from their own people said of them "Cretans are always liars, wicked brutes, lazy gluttons." This testimony is true.” (Titus 1:12-14) Here is an instance where Paul quotes someone who has said that “Cretans are always liars.” This is a negative generalization of an entire group of people, (the Cretans, a race from the island of Crete.) And Paul says that “this testimony is true.” Paul agrees with this assertion, that indeed it is true that EVERY SINGLE CRETAN IS A LIAR, and Paul also teaches that it is ok to over-generalize an entire group of people. To stereotype them. Paul also claims that people should imitate him: "Be ye followers of me, even as I also am of Christ,” (I Corinthians 11:1) We now begin to see where some of the racist Christian sects are getting their doctrines. It is a simple case of racist teachings producing racist people. Paul does not forego the previous belief that the Jews are a Holy Race, but instead includes White people, the Roman Gentiles, in this ‘everlasting covenant.’ But what does he say of non-Jews and non-whites? He says they are “always liars, wicked brutes, lazy gluttons…”
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