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The Shrew

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Everything posted by The Shrew

  1. Pope Washes Feet Of Young Muslim Woman

    If you wish to think it a gimmick that is your right to think so. Just as it is my right to disagree with you on that point. Now to clear up one thing that you seem to have muddled in this post. The Pope did not wash feet for the forgiveness of sins. That in Christianity (Especially the RCC) is done through Baptism and through the crucifixion. The washing of feet is putting oneself into a position of servitude below the person who's feet you are washing. Yes those who elect the Pope (The College of Cardinals) are sinners. As are you, me, and people in general. None of us are above sinning. As for the news link you posted. One case of child abuse and molestation is to much. But also on the flip side of that coin. The Catholic Church has done more than any other entity to remedy the problem. They also have a lower rate of this problem than any other entity. Not that make one case of it right but they are at least showing a effort to do something about it. And to be quite frank about it no monetary value could make it right. Some of this is blood sucking lawyers also. Who do you think the faithful turn to for forgiveness of sins? We the faithful turn to God. The Pope is the figure head and leader of the RCC. Most institutions do have a hierarchy Hence Popes,Cardinals, Bishops, Priests, Deacons, ect.....
  2. North Korea Starting Again

    North Korea is threatening again with actions of war. Due to more U.N. sanctions. Furious over sanctions, NKorea vows to nuke US By EDITH M. LEDERER and HYUNG-JIN KIM | Associated Press – Thu, Mar 7, 2013 Email Share9274 38 Print North Korea Threatens a Pre-Emptive Nuclear Strike on U.S.ABC News Videos 0:00North Korea vows nuclear action as the United Nations votes on sanctions. UNITED NATIONS (AP) — North Korea vowed on Thursday to launch a pre-emptive nuclear strike against the United States, amplifying its threatening rhetoric as U.N. diplomats voted on whether to level new sanctions against Pyongyang for its recent nuclear test. An unidentified spokesman for Pyongyang's Foreign Ministry said the North will exercise its right for "a preemptive nuclear attack to destroy the strongholds of the aggressors" because Washington is pushing to start a nuclear war against the North. Although North Korea boasts of nuclear bombs and pre-emptive strikes, it is not thought to have mastered the ability to produce a warhead small enough to put on a missile capable of reaching the U.S. It is believed to have enough nuclear fuel, however, for several crude nuclear devices. Such inflammatory rhetoric is common from North Korea, and especially so in recent days. North Korea is angry over the possible sanctions and over upcoming U.S.-South Korean military drills. At a mass rally in Pyongyang on Thursday, tens of thousands of North Koreans protested the U.S.-South Korean war drills and sanctions. Army Gen. Kang Pyo Yong told the crowd that North Korea is ready to fire long-range nuclear-armed missiles at Washington. "Intercontinental ballistic missiles and various other missiles, which have already set their striking targets, are now armed with lighter, smaller and diversified nuclear warheads and are placed on a standby status," Kang said. "When we shell (the missiles), Washington, which is the stronghold of evils, .... will be engulfed in a sea of fire." North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un and former NBA basketball player Dennis Rodman (front L) hug in Pyongyang in this undated picture released by North Korea's KCNA news agency on March 1, 2013. KCNA ... more 1 / 10 | Photo By KCNA / REUTERS Share to FacebookShare to PinterestShare to Twitter ClosePrevious image Next image The U.N. Security Council was considering a fourth round of sanctions against Pyongyang in a fresh attempt to rein in its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. The resolution was drafted by the United States and China, North Korea's closest ally. The council's agreement to put the resolution to a vote just 48 hours later signaled that it would almost certainly have the support of all 15 council members. The statement by the North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman was carried by the North's official Korean Central News Agency. It accused the U.S. of leading efforts to slap sanctions on North Korea. The statement said the new sanctions would only advance the timing for North Korea to fulfill previous vows to take "powerful second and third countermeasures" against its enemies. It hasn't elaborated on those measures. The statement said North Korea "strongly warns the U.N. Security Council not to make another big blunder like the one in the past when it earned the inveterate grudge of the Korean nation by acting as a war servant for the U.S. in 1950." North Korea demanded the U.N. Security Council immediately dismantle the American-led U.N. Command that's based in Seoul and move to end the state of war that exists on the Korean Peninsula, which continues six decades after fighting stopped because an armistice, not a peace treaty, ended the war. In anticipation of the resolution's adoption, North Korea earlier in the week threatened to cancel the 1953 cease-fire that ended the Korean War. North Korean threats have become more common as tensions have escalated following a rocket launch by Pyongyang in December and its third nuclear test on Feb. 12. Both acts defied three Security Council resolutions that bar North Korea from testing or using nuclear or ballistic missile technology and from importing or exporting material for these programs. U.S. U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice said the proposed resolution would impose some of the strongest sanctions ever ordered by the United Nations. The final version of the draft resolution, released Wednesday, identified three individuals, one corporation and one organization that would be added to the U.N. sanctions list if the measure is approved. The targets include top officials at a company that is the country's primary arms dealer and main exporter of ballistic missile-related equipment, and a national organization responsible for research and development of missiles and probably nuclear weapons. The success of a new round of sanctions could depend on enforcement by China, where most of the companies and banks that North Korea is believed to work with are based. The United States and other nations worry that North Korea's third nuclear test pushed it closer to its goal of gaining nuclear missiles that can reach the U.S. The international community has condemned the regime's nuclear and missile efforts as threats to regional security and a drain on the resources that could go to North Korea's largely destitute people. The draft resolution condemns the latest nuclear test "in the strongest terms" for violating and flagrantly disregarding council resolutions, bans further ballistic missile launches, nuclear tests "or any other provocation," and demands that North Korea return to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. It also condemns all of North Korea's ongoing nuclear activities, including its uranium enrichment. But the proposed resolution stresses the council's commitment "to a peaceful, diplomatic and political solution" and urged a resumption of six-party talks with the aim of denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula "in a peaceful manner." The proposed resolution would make it significantly harder for North Korea to move around the funds it needs to carry out its illicit programs and strengthen existing sanctions and the inspection of suspect cargo bound to and from the country. It would also ban countries from exporting specific luxury goods to the North, including yachts, luxury automobiles, racing cars, and jewelry with semi-precious and precious stones and precious metals. According to the draft, all countries would now be required to freeze financial transactions or services that could contribute to North Korea's nuclear or missile programs. To get around financial sanctions, North Koreans have been carrying around large suitcases filled with cash to move illicit funds. The draft resolution expresses concern that these bulk cash transfers may be used to evade sanctions. It clarifies that the freeze on financial transactions and services that could violate sanctions applies to all cash transfers as well as the cash couriers. The proposed resolution also bans all countries from providing public financial support for trade deals, such as granting export credits, guarantees or insurance, if the assistance could contribute to the North's nuclear or missile programs. It includes what a senior diplomat called unprecedented new travel sanctions that would require countries to expel agents working for sanctioned North Korean companies. The draft also requires states to inspect suspect cargo on their territory and prevent any vessel that refuses an inspection from entering their ports. And a new aviation measure calls on states to deny aircraft permission to take off, land or fly over their territory if illicit cargo is suspected to be aboard. ___ Lederer reported from the United Nations. Foster Klug in Seoul contributed to this report.
  3. North Korea Starting Again

    North Korea moves missile launchers, issues safety warning to foreign embassies Published April 05, 2013 FoxNews.com Questions surround North Korea's missile move US officials: North Korean missiles on the move Current crisis with North Korea different than years... As tensions continued to mount on the Korean peninsula, the communist dictatorship in the North deployed mid-range missile launchers to its east coast and reportedly warned foreign embassies Friday it cannot guarantee the safety of diplomats after April 10. Reuters reported early Friday that North Korea deployed two of its intermediate range missiles on mobile launchers and hid them on the east coast of the country, citing a South Korean news agency. South Korea said Thursday North Korea moved a missile with "considerable range" to its east coast after an unnamed spokesman for the North Korean army warned the U.S. Wednesday that its military has been cleared to wage an attack using "smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear" weapons. Meanwhile, the United Kingdom foreign office confirmed in a statement Friday that North Korea asked a number of foreign embassies in Pyongyang to consider moving staff out since they could not assure their safety in the event of conflict. "We are consulting international partners about these developments. No decisions have been taken, and we have no immediate plans to withdraw our Embassy,” the UK foreign office statement said. Under the Vienna Convention that governs diplomatic missions, host governments are required to assist in the evacuation of embassy staff from the country in the event of conflict. North Korea has railed for weeks against joint U.S. and South Korean military exercises taking place in South Korea and has expressed anger over tightened sanctions for a February nuclear test. ``The current question was not whether, but when a war would break out on the peninsula,'' because of the ``increasing threat from the United States'', China's state news agency Xinhua quoted the North's Foreign Ministry as saying, according to a Reuters report. U.S. National Security Council spokesperson Caitlin Hayden has called North Korea's threats "unhelpful and unconstructive." "It is yet another offering in a long line of provocative statements that only serve to further isolate North Korea from the rest of the international community and undermine its goal of economic development," she said. "North Korea should stop its provocative threats and instead concentrate on abiding by its international obligations." South Korean Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin dismissed reports in the Japanese and South Korean media that the missile moved this week could be a KN-08, which is believed to be a long-range missile that if operable could hit the United States. Kim told lawmakers at a hearing that the missile's range is considerable but not far enough to hit the U.S. mainland. He said he did not know the reasons behind the missile movement, saying it "could be for testing or drills." The range he described could refer to a mobile North Korean missile known as the Musudan, which has a range of 1,800 miles. That would make Japan and South Korea potential targets, but little is known about the missile's accuracy. Despite North Korea's rhetoric, analysts say they do not expect a nuclear attack, which knows the move could trigger a destructive, suicidal war that no one in the region wants. ``The rhetoric is off the charts,'' said Victor Cha, former director for Asian affairs at the White House National Security. Following through on one threat Wednesday, North Korean border authorities refused to allow entry to South Koreans who manage jointly run factories in the North Korean city of Kaesong. Washington calls the military drills, which this time have incorporated fighter jets and nuclear-capable stealth bombers, routine annual exercises between the allies. Pyongyang calls them rehearsals for a northward invasion. Fox News' Justin Fishel and the Associated Press contributed to this report. Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/04/05/north-korea-warns-military-cleared-to-wage-nuclear-attack/#ixzz2Pd3NzyYv
  4. Musical Instruments

    From what I know and that is not much Islam has a prohibition on music. Mainly if it is not in a wedding, recitation of the Koran, or the call to Prayer. I understand secular music can relay lead one astray. But what if these instruments are used to praise God and to help spread his word. Would things like string instruments still be forbidden? If so why. Thanks in advance for answers.
  5. Christianity & Islam

    drum role please.......................enter the "straw man" :whistling: on second thought naw
  6. castaway
  7. North Korea Starting Again

    North Korea warns military cleared to wage nuclear attack against US Published April 03, 2013 FoxNews.com April 3, 2013: South Korean Marines pass by K-55 self-propelled howitzers during an exercise against possible attacks by North Korea near the border village of Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea. (AP) An unnamed spokesman for the North Korean army is warning the U.S. that its military has been cleared to wage an attack using "smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear" weapons in the latest of the country's escalating warnings. North Korea has railed for weeks against joint U.S. and South Korean military exercises taking place in South Korea and has expressed anger over tightened sanctions for a February nuclear test. The spokesman said in a statement carried by the Korean Central News Agency that troops have been authorized to counter U.S. aggression with "powerful practical military counteractions." National Security Council spokesperson Caitlin Hayden called the threats "unhelpful and unconstructive." "It is yet another offering in a long line of provocative statements that only serve to further isolate North Korea from the rest of the international community and undermine its goal of economic development," she said. "North Korea should stop its provocative threats and instead concentrate on abiding by its international obligations." The Pentagon said in Washington that it will deploy a missile defense system to the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam to strengthen regional protection against a possible attack from North Korea. The defense secretary said the U.S. was seeking to defuse the situation. Despite the rhetoric, analysts say they do not expect a nuclear attack by North Korea, which knows the move could trigger a destructive, suicidal war that no one in the region wants. The strident warning from Pyongyang is latest in a series of escalating threats from North Korea, which has railed for weeks against joint U.S. and South Korean military exercises taking place in South Korea and has expressed anger over tightened sanctions for a February nuclear test. Following through on one threat Wednesday, North Korean border authorities refused to allow entry to South Koreans who manage jointly run factories in the North Korean city of Kaesong. Washington calls the military drills, which this time have incorporated fighter jets and nuclear-capable stealth bombers, routine annual exercises between the allies. Pyongyang calls them rehearsals for a northward invasion. The foes fought on opposite sides of the three-year Korean War, which ended in a truce in 1953. The divided Korean Peninsula remains in a technical state of war six decades later, and Washington keeps 28,500 troops in South Korea to protect its ally. U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Washington was doing all it can to defuse the situation, echoing comments a day earlier by Secretary of State John Kerry. "Some of the actions they've taken over the last few weeks present a real and clear danger and threat to the interests, certainly of our allies, starting with South Korea and Japan and also the threats that the North Koreans have leveled directly at the United States regarding our base in Guam, threatened Hawaii, threatened the West Coast of the United States," Hagel said Wednesday. In Pyongyang, the military statement said North Korean troops had been authorized to counter U.S. "aggression" with "powerful practical military counteractions," including nuclear weapons. "We formally inform the White House and Pentagon that the ever-escalating U.S. hostile policy toward the DPRK and its reckless nuclear threat will be smashed by the strong will of all the united service personnel and people and cutting-edge smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear strike means," an unnamed spokesman from the General Bureau of the Korean People's Army said in a statement carried by state media, referring to North Korea by its formal name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. "The U.S. had better ponder over the prevailing grave situation." However, North Korea's nuclear strike capabilities remain unclear. Pyongyang is believed to be working toward building an atomic bomb small enough to mount on a long-range missile. Long-range rocket launches designed to send satellites into space in 2009 and 2012 were widely considered covert tests of missile technology, and North Korea has conducted three underground nuclear tests, most recently in February. "I don't believe North Korea has to capacity to attack the United States with nuclear weapons mounted on missiles, and won't for many years. Its ability to target and strike South Korea is also very limited," nuclear scientist Siegfried Hecker, a senior fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, said this week. "And even if Pyongyang had the technical means, why would the regime want to launch a nuclear attack when it fully knows that any use of nuclear weapons would result in a devastating military response and would spell the end of the regime? " he said in answers posted to CISAC's website. In Seoul, a senior government official said Tuesday that it wasn't clear how advanced North Korea's nuclear weapons capabilities are. But he also noted fallout from any nuclear strike on Seoul or beyond would threaten Pyongyang as well, making a strike unlikely. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to speak publicly to the media. North Korea maintains that it needs to build nuclear weapons to defend itself against the United States. On Monday, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un led a high-level meeting of party officials who declared building the economy and "nuclear armed forces" as the nation's two top priorities. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/04/03/north-korea-warns-military-cleared-to-wage-nuclear-attack/?cmpid=googextension#ixzz2PS8qGM2n
  8. Former U.s. Solder Arrested!

    Below is a video link to this story! The arrest in my opinion is a trumped up charge with no basis. You're watching... US veteran faces judge; accused of fighting with Al Qaeda http://video.foxnews.com/v/2272863999001/us-veteran-faces-judge-accused-of-fighting-with-al-qaeda/?playlist_id=922779230001
  9. Former U.s. Solder Arrested!

    Found a written article on it. A former U.S. soldier was arrested and charged with conspiring to use a rocket-propelled grenade while fighting with an al-Qaeda affiliate in Syria against the forces of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, U.S. prosecutors said on Thursday. Eric Harroun, 30, of Phoenix, Arizona, was accused of fighting with the al-Nusrah Front, also known as al Qaeda in Iraq, which is designated by the United States as a foreign terrorist organization, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia and the FBI said in a joint statement. Even as U.S. officials call for Assad to step down in Syria and seek to support the rebels, they have expressed concern about militant groups like al Qaeda affiliates gaining afoot hold in Syria. Harroun served with the U.S. Army from 2000 to 2003 and was medically discharged after being injured in a car accident, according to an affidavit in support of a criminal complaint. The criminal charge of “conspiring to use a destructive device outside of the United States” carries a maximum penalty of life in prison. Harroun was arrested on Wednesday upon returning to the United States at an airport outside Washington and made his initial appearance in federal court in Virginia on Thursday. He has a hearing scheduled for Tuesday, the U.S. Attorney’s office said. Harroun is accused of crossing into Syria in January and fighting with members of the al-Nusrah Front against Assad’s forces, the affidavit said. Al-Nusrah is said by U.S. officials to be the best-organized and most effective armed Syrian opposition group. He was allegedly trained to use the weapon by members of al-Qaeda affiliate and is accused of firing it, participating in attacks, and posting multiple photographs of himself carrying or posing with rocket-propelled grenades and other weapons, the U.S. government said. Harroun appeared in two videos that indicated he was engaged in military action with rebel forces against the Syrian government, and in one video he said: “Bashar al-Assad, your days are numbered. ... Where (ever) you go we will find you and kill you,” according to the affidavit. In March, the FBI conducted three voluntary interviews of Harroun at the U.S. Consulate in Istanbul, during which he stated that he wanted to fight with the Free Syrian Army against the Assad regime, the affidavit said. In one incident, Harroun and other members of the Free Syrian Army allegedly engaged in a joint attack with the al-Nusrah Front on a Syrian army encampment, the affidavit said. Harroun allegedly told the FBI that during his fighting in Syria he shot about 10 people but did not know whether he killed any of them, the affidavit said. He also said he hated al Qaeda and did not know any al Qaeda members, the affidavit said. On Wednesday in the United States, the FBI conducted another voluntary interview during which Harroun allegedly said that he knew the al-Nusrah Front had been designated a terrorist organization, according to the affidavit. The U.S. Attorney’s office said a lawyer would be appointed for Harroun. http://english.alarabiya.net/en/2013/03/29/Former-U-S-soldier-accused-of-fighting-with-al-Qaeda-in-Syria.html
  10. North Korea Starting Again

    US missile defense shield going to Guam to help counter threat of possible North Korean attack Published April 03, 2013 Associated Press Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks at the National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington, Wednesday, April 3, 2013. Hagel warned of sharply deeper cuts to personnel, health care and weapons systems across his department, in order to put the brakes on spiraling costs and reshape the military for leaner budgets and new challenges. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) (The Associated Press) Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel speaks at the National Defense University at Fort McNair in Washington, Wednesday, April 3, 2013. Hagel warned of sharply deeper cuts to personnel, health care and weapons systems across his department, in order to put the brakes on spiraling costs and reshape the military for leaner budgets and new challenges. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) (The Associated Press) Next Slide Previous Slide WASHINGTON – The Pentagon said Wednesday it was deploying a missile defense shield to Guam to protect the U.S. and its allies in the region in response to increasingly hostile rhetoric from North Korea. The North renewed its threat to launch a nuclear attack on the United States. The threat issued by the General Staff of the Korean People's Army capped a week of psychological warfare and military muscle moves by both sides that have rattled the region. On Wednesday, the Pentagon announced it will deploy a land-based, high-altitude missile defense system to Guam to strengthen the Asia-Pacific region's protections against a possible attack. Pyongyang, for its part, said that America's ever-escalating hostile policy toward North Korea "will be smashed" by the North's nuclear strike and the "merciless operation" of its armed forces. "The U.S. had better ponder over the prevailing grave situation," said the translated statement, which was issued before the Pentagon announced plans to send a missile defense shield to Guam. The Pentagon had no immediate reaction to the latest statement, but earlier Wednesday Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel labeled North Korea's rhetoric as a real, clear danger and threat to the U.S. and its Asia-Pacific allies. And he said the U.S. is doing all it can to defuse the situation, echoing comments a day earlier by Secretary of State John Kerry. "Some of the actions they've taken over the last few weeks present a real and clear danger and threat to the interests, certainly of our allies, starting with South Korea and Japan and also the threats that the North Koreans have leveled directly at the United States regarding our base in Guam, threatened Hawaii, threatened the West Coast of the United States," Hagel said. He said he believes that the U.S. has had a "measured, responsible, serious responses to those threats." Deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense System is the latest step the U.S. has taken to bolster forces in the region in a far-reaching show of force aimed at countering the North Korean threat. In recent months, North Korea has taken a series of actions Washington deemed provocative, including an underground nuclear test in February and a rocket launch in December that put a satellite into space and demonstrated mastery of some of the technologies needed to produce a long-range nuclear missile. Then, several weeks ago, the North threatened to pre-emptively attack the U.S. In response, the Pentagon announced it would enhance missile defenses based on the U.S. West Coast, and it highlighted the deployment of B-52 and B-2 bombers, as well as two F-22 stealth fighters, to South Korea as part of an annual military exercise. As the exchange of rhetoric grew, U.S. officials this week said the Navy would keep the USS Decatur, a destroyer armed with missile defense systems, near the Korean peninsula for an unspecified period of time. Another destroyer, the USS John S. McCain, was shifted to the waters off the southwest coast of the Korean peninsula. Tensions have flared many times in the six decades since a truce halted the 1950-53 Korean War, but the stakes are higher now that a defiant North Korea appears to have moved closer to building a nuclear bomb that could not only threaten the South and other U.S. allies in Asia but possibly, one day, even reach U.S. territory. Even without nuclear arms, the communist North poses enough artillery within range of Seoul to devastate large parts of the capital before U.S. and South Korea could fully respond. The U.S. has about 28,500 troops in the South, and it could call on an array of air, ground and naval forces to reinforce the peninsula from elsewhere in Asia and the Pacific. U.S. officials have said that the Pentagon's military response to Pyongyang's threats has so far been aimed more at assuring South Korea and other allies in the region that America is committed to their security. U.S. military leaders also have said that despite the escalating rhetoric, they have seen nothing to suggest that North Korea is making any military moves to back up its threats. Hagel told an audience at the National Defense University that there is a path to peace on the troubled Korean peninsula, but it doesn't include making nuclear threats or taking provocative actions. The land-based THAAD missile defense system includes a truck-mounted launcher, tracking radar, interceptor missiles, and an integrated fire control system. The Pentagon said the system will boost defenses for American citizens in Guam, a U.S. territory, and U.S. forces stationed there. Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/04/03/us-missile-defense-shield-going-to-guam-to-help-counter-threat-possible-north/#ixzz2PS69gIJh
  11. North Korea Starting Again

    Hagel calls N. Korea 'real and clear danger,' as US plans defense system in Guam Published April 03, 2013 FoxNews.com How dangerous is North Korea? Bias Bash: Media serious enough on N. Korea threat... Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Wednesday that North Korea's rising threats pose a "real and clear danger," as the Pentagon continued to take precautions with a plan to deploy a missile-defense system to Guam. A senior U.S. official confirmed to Fox News that the military will deploy an Army system shown as a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense battery to Guam. The system is capable of shooting down short-, medium- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles. This follows the positioning of two U.S. destroyer ships in the region, along with plans to have two sea-based radar systems in the western Pacific. At the same time, North Korea seemed to ramp up its rhetoric even further Wednesday, warning that it's military had been cleared to attack the U.S. with "smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear" weapons. The National Security Council responded by saying such "unhelpful and unconstructive threats ... only serve to further isolate North Korea." Hagel, speaking Wednesday at the National Defense University, said the cascade of threats out of North Korea must be taken "seriously," given the country's nuclear and missile-delivery capacity -- though analysts say the country still could not fire a nuclear-tipped missile all the way to the continental United States. "As they have ratcheted up (their) bellicose, dangerous rhetoric -- and some of the actions they've taken over the last few weeks present a real and clear danger and threat to the interests, certainly of our allies, starting with South Korea and Japan," Hagel said. He also cited the "threats that the North Koreans have leveled directly at the United States regarding our base in Guam, threatened Hawaii, threatened to the West Coast of the United States." The Kim Jong Un regime has toggled in recent weeks between threatening the U.S. and threatening South Korea. In addition to announcing through an unnamed army spokesman that it had cleared a strike plan for a potential attack on the U.S., North Korea said Wednesday it had decided to bar South Korean managers and trucks delivering supplies from crossing the border to enter a jointly run factory park called Kaesong. The Kaesong industrial park started producing goods in 2004 and has been an unusual point of cooperation in an otherwise hostile relationship between the Koreas, whose three-year war ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. The Kaesong move came a day after the North said it would restart its long-shuttered plutonium reactor and a uranium enrichment plant. Both could produce fuel for nuclear weapons that North Korea is developing and has threatened to hurl at the U.S., something experts don't think it will be able to accomplish for years. The North's rising rhetoric has been met by a display of U.S. military strength, including flights of nuclear-capable bombers and stealth jets at annual South Korean-U.S. military drills that the allies call routine and North Korea says are invasion preparations. In a telephone call Tuesday evening to Chinese Defense Minister Chang Wanquan, Hagel cited North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles and said Washington and Beijing should continue to cooperate on those problems. "The secretary emphasized the growing threat to the U.S. and our allies posed by North Korea's aggressive pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs and expressed to General Chang the importance of sustained U.S.-China dialogue and cooperation on these issues," Pentagon spokesman George Little said in a statement describing the phone call. Little also disclosed that Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, will visit China later this month. It would be Dempsey's first trip to China as head of the Joint Chiefs. Hagel also invited the Chinese defense minister to visit the United States this year. Fox News' Justin Fishel and The Associated Press contributed to this report. Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/04/03/hagel-calls-n-korea-real-and-clear-danger-as-us-plans-defense-system-in-guam/#ixzz2PS5uDYVx
  12. outcast
  13. militant
  14. Christianity & Islam

    Hay JP, I will say you have a right to defend yourself here but what a flurry. Though it is bound to happen when something like this arises. You are commended for being straightforward about it though. God bless you and yours if I don't see you around much on IF after this all sorts out.
  15. 1 In 4 Americans Think Obama May Be The Antichrist - Survey

    Thanks for the chuckle. I needed it. The article shows just how far fetched people can be. Obama the Antichrist? No that he is not. Although in my opinion he is a moron. His failures as president and his lack of leadership show that. Now back to my regularly scheduled Northern redneck programming from your a typical murriken. :D
  16. Hello.

    Welcome to the forum. Hope you find what you are looking for here.
  17. seizure
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