Jump to content
Islamic Forum

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'women'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Reception Lounge
    • Introduce Yourself
    • All-in-one Forum
    • Comments & Suggestions
    • How to use this forum
    • Forum Announcements
  • Islamic Forums
    • Islamic Discussions
    • Refuting non-Muslims
    • Islamic-Western Dialogue
    • Islam Q&A
    • Islam In Your Country
    • I've Just Reverted (Converted) to Islam
    • Islamic hOt ContEstS!
    • Islamic Video & Audio
    • Short Fatwa
    • Ramadan, Eids, Hajj seasons
  • Islamic Forums in Other Languages
    • Islam auf Deutsch - Islamisches Forum
    • Islam en Español - Foro Islámico
    • المنتدى الإسلامى
    • Islam en Français - Forum Islamique
    • Islam på Svenska - Islamisk Forum
    • Islam in het Nederlands - Islamitisch Forum
    • 伊斯兰教在中国 - 伊斯兰论坛
  • General Forums
    • Political Front
    • News Room
    • Sisters' Room
    • Brothers' Room
    • General Chat
    • Counselling Room
    • Polling Station
    • Just for Fun
    • Sports
    • Competitions
  • IF Library - Islamic Section
    • Islamic Download - Free eBooks!
    • The Greatest Book on Earth!
    • Prophet Muhammad
    • Prophets, Biographies, and Islamic History
    • Avoid All Sects and Cults
    • Jihad & Misconceptions
    • Islamic Readings
    • Islamic Friday Sermons
    • Islamic Book Club
    • Islamic Gallery
    • Islamic Locations
    • Stories Of The Prophets
  • IF Community
    • Dua Corner
    • Personal Announcements
    • Coming Events
    • For Sale
    • Wanted
    • Shopping tips
    • Job Market
    • Blog archive
    • Islamic Workshop
  • IF Library - General Section
    • Learn Arabic
    • Islamic Kitchen
    • Islam & Your Health
    • Poems and Stories
    • Islamic Songs
    • Computer Room
    • Study Room
    • Islamic Link Exchange
    • Handy Web Pages
  • Muslim Webmaster
    • Free Islamic Webmasters' Services
    • Contact us
  • Stuff

Found 9 results

  1. AsalamuAlaikum, Recently Saudi Government gave permission for women to enter stadiums and watch games but certain Mufti somewhere from India issued Fatwa and called it Haraam. I want to ask brothers , what are their views on this?
  2. By Laura El Alam (a wife and mother of five in Southern California. She is a writer for London-based SISTERS Magazine andAboutislam and was previously a columnist for InFocus News. She embraced Islam in 2000.) “Creators should have nothing to do with Islamic fashion,” asserted Pierre Bergé, co-founder of Yves Saint Laurent in an interview with radio station Europe 1. “Designers are there to make women more beautiful, to give them their freedom, not to collaborate with this dictatorship which imposes this abominable thing by which we hide women and make them live a hidden life.” The “abominable thing” Bergé is referring to — modest Islamic women’s clothing — has recently been appropriated by major designers including DKNY, Dolce & Gabbana, Tommy Hilfiger, and Marks & Spencer. Fashion brands are gradually recognizing that they have a lucrative, untapped market in Muslim consumers and are producing clothes to satisfy that profitable niche. From full-body swimsuits and ankle-length dresses to abâyas and headscarves, the fashion world is starting to incorporate loose and modest garments that are a major departure from the typical sexy runway fashions. But not everyone is happy about it. In her April 14, 2016 article “What Freedom Looks Like” for the New York Times, author Vanessa Friedman explores the backlash that is coming from some people in France’s fashion industry and government. Referring to Pierre Bergé, Friedman writes, “He … implied that the designers were exploiting a misogynist system that, for financial gain, forces women to hide their bodies.” Laurence Rossignol, the French minister for women’s rights, jumped into the fashion fray. In an interview with BFTV, she likened modest clothing to a prison: “What’s at stake is social control over women’s bodies,” she said in an interview on the French news network. “When brands invest in this Islamic garment market, they are shirking their responsibilities and are promoting women’s bodies being locked up.” Rossignol then infamously compared Muslim women to “negroes” who supported slavery, causing a global uproar and accusations of racism. She later recanted that particular part of her statement. Reading the statements of these two French public figures, I am torn between derision and disgust. On one hand, I wonder how they cannot see the irony of their statements. Bergé laments a “misogynist system that, for financial gain, forces women to hide their bodies,” but apparently fails to see any problem with a high-profit fashion industry that has, for centuries, persuaded women to reveal their bodies in order to serve as sex objects, sell clothes, and entice the male gaze. When Rossignol decries “social control over women’s bodies,” doesn’t she see how women’s bodies have been controlled in various ways throughout Western history? Isn’t banning the headscarf in French schools an example of “social control?” Isn’t requiring all swimmers in French pools to wear tiny, tight, and extremely revealing swimsuits another example? On the other hand, I am disgusted with Bergé’s and Rossignol’s depressing and incorrect depiction of Muslim women. The image they are associating with a Muslim woman is of an uneducated, voiceless, oppressed person who has no say in her wardrobe or her life choices. Haven’t they observed the countless Muslim women doctors, professors, engineers, intellectuals, businesswomen, and highly educated and talented women who choose to cover? Don’t they see the millions of empowered Muslim women around the world who have the “freedom” to uncover in their country of residence if they wish, and yet often willingly embrace a modest wardrobe? Unlike Bergé and Rossignol, I view all women as intelligent beings with free will and intellect. I do not think they are so easily duped or forced into dressing or acting certain ways. Even when the runway models are waif thin and wearing extremely revealing clothing, Western non-Muslim women can still choose to dress however they wish. I would not, as Bergé does, define them as “forced” to do things. And although the fashion industry has been criticized widely for creating and perpetuating unrealistic ideals of beauty, I still would not describe Western women as being “locked up” by the shackles of fashion. They have a choice and a mind, should they choose to use them. What about Muslim women? Do we have any choice in our clothing? Are we, as Rossignol said, “consenting slaves”? Are our long dresses, tunics, and abayas truly a prison for us? Do we need to be liberated by the likes of Bergé and Rossignol? First, if the opponents of Islamic clothing bothered to ask Muslim women their opinion, they would learn something that might surprise them: the vast majority of Muslim women who dress modestly do it willingly and for one reason: to please their Creator. “Yes, but what if their husband or father or government is forcing them to cover?” someone is bound to argue. To that question I would reply, “A Muslim woman’s duty to cover is mandated by her Creator. Regardless of what others in her life might do or say, dressing modestly is an act of obedience to Allah. Some women might indeed be exploited or mistreated by individuals or governments, but any oppression of women is un-Islamic.” Besides, do people seriously think that non-Muslim women are free from oppression, coercion, and control? What about uniforms that require women to show their legs, arms, and chests to look appealing for customers? What about egotistical husbands who want their wives to look like “arm candy” at all times? What about mothers who constantly pressure their daughters to lose weight, wear makeup, and squeeze into the latest styles so that they can find a husband, thrive socially, or be a “credit” to their parents? Aren’t these females victims, too?” So let’s look at a realistic view of Muslim women. Of course, there are some Muslimahs who choose not to cover at all, and their freedom of choice is obvious. The majority of Muslim women who do dress modestly do so with their eyes wide open. Their goals are the noblest ones possible: To please their Creator and to earn Paradise. By covering their bodies, they are eschewing public opinion, pop culture, and a superficial understanding of beauty. They are refusing to exhibit their attractiveness or to sell their bodies. Their faith tells them that their worth is not based on their outward appearance, but on their character and morals. Their inner beauty (the most important one) is apparent in their actions and manners, and their outward beauty is revealed on their own terms, only to those who can be entrusted with it. That is empowerment, not prison. Bergé and Rossignol would like to cast themselves as super heroes whose noble task is to liberate the poor Muslim women who are living what Bergé calls “a hidden life.” What, I would ask them, is wrong with a hidden life? Should everything be made public? Aren’t there certain things that even French people would like to keep private? Why should women’s bodies and beauty be expected to be on display for other’s enjoyment? Are men entitled to that? If, theoretically, all women started dressing modestly, who, exactly, would find that disappointing? Is this whole issue really about women’s feelings and empowerment, or about men’s insistence on keeping them half undressed? If a woman chooses to cover her own body in compliance with her faith, isn’t that her right, her freedom? It comes down to a matter of semantics, in a way. What some people call an “abominable thing,” others call “modesty.” What some call “locked up” others call “liberated.” Even the very first word of Bergé’s quote proves that he has a completely different mindset from a Muslim. He uses the term “creators” to describe designers like himself. It is their duty, asserts Bergé, to “make women more beautiful and to give them their freedom.” What a lofty goal for mere mortals with a flair for design! Muslims, of course, have a completely different definition of “Creator.” We live our life to please the One Creator, Allah, and our beauty and freedom are gifts from Him and contingent upon Him. No miniskirt or makeup can make us beautiful if we are rotten on the inside. No politicians or fashionistas can free us if our hearts are slaves to a false god. Therein lies the crux of the matter and why Bergé and Rossegnol will never see why our freedom and our power are in the very garments they abhor. http://aljumuah.com/liberal-discontent-with-designer-modesty/
  3. Status Of Women In Islam

    The west has commonly drawn a stereotype image of Muslim women clad from head to toe in a black veil and abaya. They are deemed as voiceless, meek figures that do not have any rights or the power to stand up for what they believe in. On the contrary, there is no religion other than Islam which gives women such an exalted position, her true rights and complete respect. As a matter of fact, the first woman of Islam, Hazrat Khadjia (RA) was a business woman herself and the most beloved wife of Holy Prophet (PBUH) in whose life, he never married anyone else. Some rights of women prescribed by Holy Prophet (PBUH) over 1400 years ago are as follows: Read More Info: Women in Islam
  4. “WOMEN ARE COMPLICATED” or so they say... The number one most complicated matter in regards to women is the Fiqh of Women. But it doesn’t have to be. In a step towards empowering Muslim women and uncomplicating matters surrounding them, AlMaghrib Institute is introducing a well-deserved and long-awaited seminar dedicated to the Muslim Woman. COMPLICATED? A-Z of Women’s Modern Fiqh Taught by none other than AlMaghrib’s Vice President, SHAYKH WALEED BASYOUNI A SINGLE-WEEKEND-DEGREE SEMINAR What the course content will cover: 1. Public speaking 2. Socialization and interaction with the community 3. Niqaab and Hijaab 4. Beautification and modesty (hayaa) 5. Character and etiquette 6. Menstruation and purification 7. Leading in Salaah and making the Adhaan 8. Following the Janazah and visiting the graves 9. Zakah and Sadaqah 10. Polygamy, marriage and divorce 11. And many more… Why should a man take this class? 1. Content is related in the MODERN context 2. Key to understanding women and appreciating what they face 3. Handle Fiqh issues in an Islamic and wise way 4. Gain the complete view as a student of knowledge Venue: University of Westminster Little Titchfield Street Campus Little Titchfield Street London W1W 7BY Dates: January 31st, February 1st & 2nd 2014 ENROLL NOW: www.almaghrib.org/london Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/almaghriblondon Twitter: [at]qshams Follow on Instagram: qabeelatalshams
  5. Headscarved women new targets of anti-Islam groups 23 June 2013 /EMRE DEMİR, PARIS Headscarved Muslim women are increasingly becoming targets of persons with Islamophobic sentiments in France, with the number of racist attacks against them rising dramatically in the last two months, according to observers in the country. Several of the attacks on headscarved women covered by the media in the last two months took place in Argenteuil, a suburb in northwestern Paris. The representatives of Muslim organizations in France are deeply concerned that these incidents are linked. They highlight that new extreme right-wing organizations in France such as Bloc Identitaire and Riposte Laique are gaining in popularity among young people by carrying out anti-Islamic attacks. Evaluating the recent attacks targeting Muslim headscarved women in France to Sunday’s Zaman, Raphael Liogier -- an academic from the faculty of political science at the University of Provence, Aix-Marseille I -- said Islamophobia has been replaced by paranoia. Liogier, the author of “The Islamization Myth,” said: “We can no longer talk about Islamophobia. If we were in a situation of phobia, it would not lead to acting out but just to rejection. Therefore, we cannot define these incidents as the results of a phobia, but paranoia. In the case of a phobia, you can be in rejection or fear. However, we observe more aggressive actions against ‘the other’ in these incidents. Such incidents were not the case before 2003 or 2004.” Stating that this anti-Muslim paranoia has intensified since 2003 when US troops invaded Iraq, Liogier said: “There were no theses claiming that Muslim people had a plan to impose their cultures on French society, or that Muslims were conducting colonialism in reverse in France before 2003. The physical attacks that veiled women have recently been exposed to are not considered by some Islamophobic authors to be the result of phobia,” but a legitimate self-defense movement against the aggression of Muslims.” Noting that the extremist marginal groups such as Bloc Identitaire and Riposte Laique conducting recent racist attacks against veiled women in France cannot be explained with leftist or rightist ideologies, Liogier said: “Such actions have not originated from rightist or leftist ideas. They are fomenting the idea that Europe’s identity is being shattered. These groups gathered around the myth that France is being Islamicized. The rightist groups use religious and national values such as those represented by Joan of Arc to create the perception of a threat, while leftists use freedom of expression and gender equality. Such ideas can sometimes be influential on a wide range of French political parties with various political ideologies.” French Muslims critical of government’s indifference Critical of the lack of interest that the French government and media have shown for the racist attacks targeting veiled women in the last two months, Samy Debah -- president of the Collective against Islamophobia in France (CCIF) -- told Sunday’s Zaman that it is very embarrassing that French politicians remained silent in the face of the attacks. He added: “What is Interior Minister Manuel Valls waiting for to react against the attacks or release a statement condemning the attacks? The French government should take necessary precautions for such racist attacks against Muslims as soon as possible. According to the CCIF’s annual report released in 2012, headscarved women are targeted in 87 percent of racist attacks that Muslims are exposed to in France.” Amar Lafsar, president of the Union of Islamic Organizations of France (UOIF), a national body with ties to the Muslim Brotherhood, told Sunday’s Zaman that Muslims living in France say they live in fear. “We know France is not an Islamophobic country. However, the Muslims victimized by racists should regularly inform French public officials about the attacks they experience.” Abdallah Zekri, president of the Paris-Based Anti-Islamophobia Observatory, told Sunday’s Zaman that the number of racist attacks that Muslims experience in France has risen by 42 percent over the past year. Noting that a recent ban on burqa-like Islamic veils and discussions over halal meat in France played a great part in the widespread trend of racist attacks against veiled Muslim women in the country, Zekri commented: “The fact that politicians have recently increased the frequency of their provocative remarks, in which they show Muslims as targets, have also led the extremist rightist groups to intensify their attacks against the Muslims in France.” The French ban on wearing a burqa in public was enacted in April 2011. Under the terms of the legislation, anyone wearing the headdress in public will face a 150 euro fine or be forced to take lessons in French citizenship. The act drew harsh reactions and led to debates in France when it was first adopted. Some recent attacks targeting veiled women in France The latest attack against a veiled woman in France took place on June 13 in the Paris suburb of Argenteuil. A pregnant Muslim woman, Leila O., was physically attacked by two men and was seriously injured. The 21-year-old, who was four months pregnant, suffered a miscarriage. The attackers first tried taking her headscarf off and later cut her hair and tore part of her clothing. After she screamed out that she was pregnant, one of the attackers started kicking her in the stomach. A 33-year-old Turkish headscarved woman was physically assaulted by a motorcyclist while walking on the street in the French city of Reims on June 9. A woman of North African origin was physically attacked by a man with her 1-year-old baby in Beziers on May 24. The woman was injured in the attack. Again on May 24, Jean-Claude Boistard -- the mayor of Montsoult, a suburb in northern Paris – refused to allow a woman to enter the municipal building since she was wearing a veil. Boistard defended himself by stating that because the municipal building is a public place, no one can enter the building with religious symbols. A 17-year-old Muslim girl, Rabia, was accosted by two persons in the street in Argenteuil on May 20. The assailants tore her veil off and assaulted her. Regarding the incident, Rabia told Le Parisien that the assailants were yelling “Dirty Arab” and “Dirty Muslim” at her. Two men physically assaulted a 21-year-old Muslim woman in Argenteuil on May 1 and ripped her veil off. The French police raided the home of a suspected assailant who was allegedly preparing to stage an armed attack on Muslims on June 19 in Argenteuil. http://www.todayszaman.com/news-318968-.html
  6. Muslim women face an uphill battle against prejudice to find work Many Muslim women feel pressured to change their appearance to get a job. Employers must question their own assumptions Baroness Warsi may have opted for shalwar khameez for her first meeting of the cabinet in May 2010, but for many Muslim women, the struggle is to downplay ethnic or religious difference in order to find acceptance – and employment. A recent parliamentary report found that Muslim women often feel pressured to change their appearance or anglicise their name in order to access employment. Often, it is the "triple paralysis" of being a woman, migrant, or perceived as such, and Muslim. While in some cases, the barriers are cultural, linguistic or educational, research suggests that 25% of the ethnic minority unemployment rate for both men and women could be explained by prejudice and racial discrimination. South Asian Muslim women have the highest rate of unemployment in terms of both religion and ethnicity in the UK. Many are highly educated, ambitious women like Shazba, a speech therapist and single mother, who struggles to understand the consistent rejections. She has been unemployed for five years despite a masters qualification and extensive voluntary experience: "I've been through numerous interviews for my first job. Needless to say, I feel I'm not getting the job as employers see I wear hijab and look for reasons to turn me down." When I push her on how exactly she can be sure her headscarf is the problem, given high rates of unemployment more broadly, she responds: "It's body language, tonality – I once walked into an interview and the interviewer's face just crashed." Others encounter difficulties within the workplace itself, where requests for minor adaptations are met with resistance. Reema, a 34-year-old obstetrician, has to remove her hijab in order to perform surgery. She explains that her London hospital trust has been unwilling to consider small alterations to the scrubs uniform worn in surgery, despite the possibility of ensuring sterility standards. In her experience, "when young doctors in foundation stages see the problem with hijab in theatres, they think of choosing specialities without surgery, even though they are interested in surgical specialities." This self-selecting out of certain professions is one of the barriers to employment noted by the report. Others include assumptions about Muslim women and how their religious identity is likely to impact on their work. A recurring theme was of women feeling "essentialised" – Muslim journalists consistently asked to cover "Muslim" stories, Muslim solicitors hired as a means of accessing certain communities, or a hospice worker whose conversations were routinely directed at her faith. From questions about pregnancy plans through to being asked, "We have a lot of gay staff here – is that going to be a problem for you?", many women felt their identity was reduced to their scarf and the assumptions people made about it. For women who had to undergo a traineeship, the pressure of what one's supervisor might think made them vulnerable to prejudice. Some were advised to change the style or colour of their scarf in order to appear more "client friendly", others were asked if they intended to keep wearing it, a question they interpreted as meaning it could work against their application. A trainee solicitor at a leading international law firm was told she was "sheltered" and "deferent", something her employers put down her "background". She eventually opted to remove her scarf. Fiyaz Mughal, director of the Tell Mama (Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks) campaign says: "These are not just isolated problems. There are strong perceptions in Muslim communities that employment discrimination is rife." According to the report, the impact on women's self-confidence is significant, something Mughal corroborates: "This causes a lack of confidence … as they think about where their future lies." Such concerns are not unfounded. Consistent workplace inactivity in younger women can lead to difficulties in finding a job later in life. This is all the more worrying given that Pakistani and Bangladeshi families experience extremely high poverty rates and in light of the fact BME concentration in the public sector means they are more likely to be affected by cuts. The portrayal of Muslim women in the media as passive victims, or as problems, undoubtedly renders them less desirable to prospective employers. Barrister Sultana Tafadar explained that some chambers were concerned that women in headscarves might be perceived as less competent and more judgmental of clients. Women who work in the service sector were made to feel they'd struggle to fit into the team. But it would be a mistake to assume this sort of subtle discrimination is limited to women. Ed Husain, author of the Islamist, revealed that he changed his name because he didn't feel comfortable with Mohammed and in 2009, researchers uncovered widespread racial discrimination against workers with African and Asian names, among whom unemployment rates remain consistently higher than average. Muslim women stand at the intersection of race, gender and religious difference, which significantly increases their likelihood of suffering prejudice. But the focus on Muslim women shouldn't serve to further essentialise their identity – they merely represent the sharp end of a stick which indicates the persistence of sexism, racism and religious discrimination in broader society and their impact on people's life choices. From: http://www.guardian.co.uk/
  7. Please only answer the post if you are a native speaker of Arabic. I am only interested in native speakers opinions, not even people that have studied Arabic for many years. The question is simple, the Koran verse 4:34 when talking about disobident wives, it suggest the following action should be taken against them (among other things): إضربوهن What does this mean? The traditional translation is that it means to hit them: YUSUFALI: beat them (lightly) PICKTHAL: scourge them SHAKIR: beat them But I have read a few places online that it could have another meaning not connected with physical violence of any sort. So I was interested in knowing what actual native Arabic speakers think it means and what propertion of native Arabic speakers think it could mean something else. Thanks everyone.
  8. Striking A Woman

    As I understand it via my translation of the Qur'an and through some YouTube videos and even a response on this very forum striking a woman is allowed in Islam. I think perhaps there is a cultural or language problem here because surely this is not so. I know personally I would be horrified and beyond angry should some man someday place his hands on my daughter when she is older and married.
  9. The claim that in Islam only males get pleasure in Paradise and women are deprived of it is completely wrong. There are many Qur'anic verses which show that both males and females will be rewarded for Good deeds, and not least injustice will be done to them. Moreover, life in paradise will be very different from this life. 093.004 وَلَلآخِرَةُ خَيْرٌ لَكَ مِنَ الأولَى 093.004 Walal-[a]khiratu khayrun laka mina al-ool[a] 093.004 And verily the Hereafter will be better for thee than the present. Al-Qur'an, 093.004 (Ad-Dhuha [The Morning Hours, Morning Bright]) 093.005 وَلَسَوْفَ يُعْطِيكَ رَبُّكَ فَتَرْضَى 093.005 Walasawfa yuAA[t]eeka rabbuka fatar[da] 093.005 And soon will thy Guardian-Lord give thee (that wherewith) thou shalt be well-pleased. Al-Qur'an, 093.005 (Ad-Dhuha [The Morning Hours, Morning Bright]) Bukhari :: Book 6 :: Volume 60 :: Hadith 303 Narrated Abu Huraira: The Prophet, said, "Allah said, 'I have prepared for My pious worshipers such things as no eye has ever seen, no ear has ever heard of, and nobody has ever thought of. All that is reserved, besides which, all that you have seen, is nothing." Then he recited:-- 032.017 فَلا تَعْلَمُ نَفْسٌ مَا أُخْفِيَ لَهُمْ مِنْ قُرَّةِ أَعْيُنٍ جَزَاءً بِمَا كَانُوا يَعْمَلُونَ 032.017 Fal[a] taAAlamu nafsun m[a] okhfiya lahum min qurrati aAAyunin jaz[a]an bim[a] k[a]noo yaAAmaloon(a) 032.017 Now no person knows what delights of the eye are kept hidden (in reserve) for them - as a reward for their (good) deeds. Al-Qur'an, 032.017 (As-Sajda [The Prostration, Worship, Adoration]) 033.035 إِنَّ الْمُسْلِمِينَ وَالْمُسْلِمَاتِ وَالْمُؤْمِنِينَ وَالْمُؤْمِنَاتِ وَالْقَانِتِينَ وَالْقَانِتَاتِ وَالصَّادِقِينَ وَالصَّادِقَاتِ وَالصَّابِرِينَ وَالصَّابِرَاتِ وَالْخَاشِعِينَ وَالْخَاشِعَاتِ وَالْمُتَصَدِّقِينَ وَالْمُتَصَدِّقَاتِ وَالصَّائِمِينَ وَالصَّائِمَاتِ وَالْحَافِظِينَ فُرُوجَهُمْ وَالْحَافِظَاتِ وَالذَّاكِرِينَ اللَّهَ كَثِيرًا وَالذَّاكِرَاتِ أَعَدَّ اللَّهُ لَهُمْ مَغْفِرَةً وَأَجْرًا عَظِيمًا 033.035 Inna almuslimeena wa(a)lmuslim[a]ti wa(a)lmu/mineena wa(a)lmu/min[a]ti wa(a)lq[a]niteena wa(a)lq[a]nit[a]ti wa(al)[ssa]diqeena wa(al)[ssa]diq[a]ti wa(al)[ssa]bireena wa(al)[ssa]bir[a]ti wa(a)lkh[a]shiAAeena wa(a)lkh[a]shiAA[a]ti wa(a)lmutaaddiqeena wa(a)lmutaaddiq[a]ti wa(al)[ssa]-imeena wa(al)[ssa]-im[a]ti wa(a)l[ha]fi{th}eena furoojahum wa(a)l[ha]fi{th}[a]ti wa(al)[ththa]kireena All[a]ha katheeran wa(al)[ththa]kir[a]ti aAAadda All[a]hu lahum maghfiratan waajran AAa{th}eem[a](n) 033.035 For Muslim men and women,- for believing men and women, for devout men and women, for true men and women, for men and women who are patient and constant, for men and women who humble themselves, for men and women who give in Charity, for men and women who fast (and deny themselves), for men and women who guard their chastity, and for men and women who engage much in Allah's praise,- for them has Allah prepared forgiveness and great reward. Al-Qur'an, 033.035 (Al-Ahzab [The Clans, the Coalition, the Combined Forces]) 016.097 مَنْ عَمِلَ صَالِحًا مِنْ ذَكَرٍ أَوْ أُنْثَى وَهُوَ مُؤْمِنٌ فَلَنُحْيِيَنَّهُ حَيَاةً طَيِّبَةً وَلَنَجْزِيَنَّهُمْ أَجْرَهُمْ بِأَحْسَنِ مَا كَانُوا يَعْمَلُونَ 016.097 Man AAamila [sa]li[h]an min [th]akarin aw onth[a] wahuwa mu/minun falanu[h]yiyannahu [h]ay[a]tan [t]ayyibatan walanajziyannahum ajrahum bi-a[h]sani m[a] k[a]noo yaAAmaloon(a) 016.097 Whoever works righteousness, man or woman, and has Faith, verily, to him will We give a new Life, a life that is good and pure and We will bestow on such their reward according to the best of their actions. Al-Qur'an, 016.097 (An-Nahl [The Bee]) 003.195 فَاسْتَجَابَ لَهُمْ رَبُّهُمْ أَنِّي لا أُضِيعُ عَمَلَ عَامِلٍ مِنْكُمْ مِنْ ذَكَرٍ أَوْ أُنْثَى بَعْضُكُمْ مِنْ بَعْضٍ فَالَّذِينَ هَاجَرُوا وَأُخْرِجُوا مِنْ دِيَارِهِمْ وَأُوذُوا فِي سَبِيلِي وَقَاتَلُوا وَقُتِلُوا لأكَفِّرَنَّ عَنْهُمْ سَيِّئَاتِهِمْ وَلأدْخِلَنَّهُمْ جَنَّاتٍ تَجْرِي مِنْ تَحْتِهَا الأنْهَارُ ثَوَابًا مِنْ عِنْدِ اللَّهِ وَاللَّهُ عِنْدَهُ حُسْنُ الثَّوَابِ 003.195 Fa(i)staj[a]ba lahum rabbuhum annee l[a] o[d]eeAAu AAamala AA[a]milin minkum min [th]akarin aw onth[a] baAA[d]ukum min baAA[d]in fa(a)lla[th]eena h[a]jaroo waokhrijoo min diy[a]rihim waoo[th]oo fee sabeelee waq[a]taloo waqutiloo laokaffiranna AAanhum sayyi-[a]tihim walaodkhilannahum jann[a]tin tajree min ta[h]tih[a] al-anh[a]ru thaw[a]ban min AAindi All[a]hi wa(A)ll[a]hu AAindahu [h]usnu a(l)ththaw[a]b(i) 003.195 And their Lord hath accepted of them, and answered them: "Never will I suffer to be lost the work of any of you, be he male or female: Ye are members, one of another: Those who have left their homes, or been driven out therefrom, or suffered harm in My Cause, or fought or been slain,- verily, I will blot out from them their iniquities, and admit them into Gardens with rivers flowing beneath;- A reward from the presence of Allah, and from His presence is the best of rewards." Al-Qur'an, 003.195 (Aal-E-Imran [The Family of Imran]) 040.040 مَنْ عَمِلَ سَيِّئَةً فَلا يُجْزَى إِلا مِثْلَهَا وَمَنْ عَمِلَ صَالِحًا مِنْ ذَكَرٍ أَوْ أُنْثَى وَهُوَ مُؤْمِنٌ فَأُولَئِكَ يَدْخُلُونَ الْجَنَّةَ يُرْزَقُونَ فِيهَا بِغَيْرِ حِسَابٍ 040.040 Man AAamila sayyi-atan fal[a] yujz[a] ill[a] mithlah[a] waman AAamila [sa]li[h]an min [th]akarin aw onth[a] wahuwa mu/minun faol[a]-ika yadkhuloona aljannata yurzaqoona feeh[a] bighayri [h]is[a]b(in) 040.040 "He that works evil will not be requited but by the like thereof: and he that works a righteous deed - whether man or woman - and is a Believer- such will enter the Garden (of Bliss): Therein will they have abundance without measure. Al-Qur'an, 040.040 (Al-Ghafir [The Forgiver [God]]) 057.018 إِنَّ الْمُصَّدِّقِينَ وَالْمُصَّدِّقَاتِ وَأَقْرَضُوا اللَّهَ قَرْضًا حَسَنًا يُضَاعَفُ لَهُمْ وَلَهُمْ أَجْرٌ كَرِيمٌ 057.018 Inna almu[ss]addiqeena wa(a)lmu[ss]addiq[a]ti waaqra[d]oo All[a]ha qar[d]an [h]asanan yu[da]AAafu lahum walahum ajrun kareem(un) 057.018 For those who give in Charity, men and women, and loan to Allah a Beautiful Loan, it shall be increased manifold (to their credit), and they shall have (besides) a liberal reward. Al-Qur'an, 057.018 (Al-Hadid [The Iron]) 009.072 وَعَدَ اللَّهُ الْمُؤْمِنِينَ وَالْمُؤْمِنَاتِ جَنَّاتٍ تَجْرِي مِنْ تَحْتِهَا الأنْهَارُ خَالِدِينَ فِيهَا وَمَسَاكِنَ طَيِّبَةً فِي جَنَّاتِ عَدْنٍ وَرِضْوَانٌ مِنَ اللَّهِ أَكْبَرُ ذَلِكَ هُوَ الْفَوْزُ الْعَظِيمُ 009.072 WaAAada All[a]hu almu/mineena wa(a)lmu/min[a]ti jann[a]tin tajree min ta[h]tih[a] al-anh[a]ru kh[a]lideena feeh[a] wamas[a]kina [t]ayyibatan fee jann[a]ti AAadnin wari[d]w[a]nun mina All[a]hi akbaru [tha]lika huwa alfawzu alAAa{th}eem(u) 009.072 Allah hath promised to Believers, men and women, gardens under which rivers flow, to dwell therein, and beautiful mansions in gardens of everlasting bliss. But the greatest bliss is the good pleasure of Allah: that is the supreme felicity. Al-Qur'an, 009.072 (At-Tawba [Repentance, Dispensation]) 004.124 وَمَنْ يَعْمَلْ مِنَ الصَّالِحَاتِ مِنْ ذَكَرٍ أَوْ أُنْثَى وَهُوَ مُؤْمِنٌ فَأُولَئِكَ يَدْخُلُونَ الْجَنَّةَ وَلا يُظْلَمُونَ نَقِيرًا 004.124 Waman yaAAmal mina a(l)[ssa]li[ha]ti min [th]akarin aw onth[a] wahuwa mu/minun faol[a]-ika yadkhuloona aljannata wal[a] yu{th}lamoona naqeer[a](n) 004.124 If any do deeds of righteousness,- be they male or female - and have faith, they will enter Heaven, and not the least injustice will be done to them. Al-Qur'an, 004.124 (An-Nisa [Women])
×