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By What Criteria Does Someone Become A Scholar?

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Question in the title.

 

The reason I ask is in my opinion, a scholar is a learned individual who cites research to make conclusions, but considering the discernment between typical Muslims and scholars that I have witnessed on this board there must be a wider distinction than that. What is it? Does one have to be enrolled at a particular institution, or acknowledged by some group of individuals to officially be a Muslim scholar?

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:sl:

 

Here is a very good article on the necessity of knowledge, and the definition of an 'Alim:

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_askimam(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/fatwa/fatwa.php?askid=1a4c3abaa8cb5083dcba2f6911629b65"]Link[/url]

 

:sl:

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this is what I gained from that article

 

This does not mean one should take the opinion of anyone who claims to be a scholar. If someone starts taking opinions from anyone who claims to be a scholar, they may be led astray. One should find an 'Alim of the Ahl-al-Sunnah Wal-Jama'ah, preferably one who follows the same madhab. He should have the qualities of a true scholar of Deen such as humility and having true taqwa (fear of Allah Ta'ala). He should be one who adheres to the sunnah of Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alayhi Wa Sallam). One must make sure he studied and attained his knowledge with the guidance of other 'Ulema with these same qualities. The true meaning of an 'Alim is defined in the Holy Quran. Allah Ta'ala says:

 

so does this mean that someone has to study under a large body of individuals already recognized as scholars before they can enjoy that distinction?

 

What path would a student usually follow to become a scholar?

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go to Saudi Arabia , Madina or Mekkah or go to both and ask the people in the offices in the haram ( mekkah ) or in the offices of alharamein ( the madina ) , whos the highest scholars which i can study from and they will tell you .... follow them and they will guide you .

 

surely their are great scholars buy their books and learn their knowledge which summurizes aspects and make it ease for us to understand and make the branch quicker in our head .

 

Shikh Al albany & binbaz *rahomohom Allah , & Sheikh Abu baker & Abdul Bari & huthaifein .. and etc...

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Salamz

I raised a similar question on another thread..and was told that one can go to an Islamic school to become one.

Im East Coast so I checked out this one place ( Islamic university in Boston, USA).you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetislamicau(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/static/Students/DegreeProgram/tabid/126/Default.aspx

26 +68 credits..I think one can duke it out in a couple years.

Ofcource if any1 know the official requirement backed up by a good source then please share.

Peace

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this is what I gained from that article

so does this mean that someone has to study under a large body of individuals already recognized as scholars before they can enjoy that distinction?

 

What path would a student usually follow to become a scholar?

 

Yes, that's the jist of it.

 

Also, in Islamic scholarship, there is this system of Ijazah.

It's a form of a certificate (doesn't have to be tangible) which is passed on from one scholar to the other. The first scholar in the chain is of course Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him. From him to a Sahabi (companion of the Prophet, peace be upon him), and from him to a person in the next generation, and so on.

 

So a present day authentic scholar would have such an ijazah, where he should be able to link himself on a chain, all the way back to the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him. i.e. "I learned it from my teacher, my teacher leanred from so and so teacher, and that teacher from so and so 'Alim..." all of them repeating, connecting back to a companion of the Prophet, and then the Prophet (peace be upon him) himself. This ijazah system ensures correct understanding of the Qur'an and Sunnah (life) of the Prophet (peace be upon him) as it was meant to be understood.

 

Allah knows best.

Edited by k-meleon

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that is extremely interesting

thanks for your answer

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this is what I gained from that article

 

This does not mean one should take the opinion of anyone who claims to be a scholar. If someone starts taking opinions from anyone who claims to be a scholar, they may be led astray. One should find an 'Alim of the Ahl-al-Sunnah Wal-Jama'ah, preferably one who follows the same madhab. He should have the qualities of a true scholar of Deen such as humility and having true taqwa (fear of Allah Ta'ala). He should be one who adheres to the sunnah of Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alayhi Wa Sallam). One must make sure he studied and attained his knowledge with the guidance of other 'Ulema with these same qualities. The true meaning of an 'Alim is defined in the Holy Quran. Allah Ta'ala says:

 

so does this mean that someone has to study under a large body of individuals already recognized as scholars before they can enjoy that distinction?

Sounds like the establishment is ensuring the propogation of the establishment...how much critical thought is allowed in this system?

 

This ijazah system ensures correct understanding of the Qur'an and Sunnah (life) of the Prophet (peace be upon him) as it was meant to be understood.

When you consider how backward the Muslim world is, how little development we have, both technologically and intellectually in the world of the sciences...which is the reason the Muslim world has allowed the Jews to dominate and commit all kinds of atrocities against the Palestinians...just how good of a job have the scholar's done? Isn't it the scholars job to ensure the Ummah has correct understanding of our Deen, part of which, is to use our mind and leverage the bounty of the earth and the heavens to the Ummah's benefit - indeed all of mankind.

 

Why have the Scholars failed to do this...if they are rightly guided?

Edited by odobknarf

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Assalaamu 'Alaykum,

 

the Noble Shaykh Hamūd ibn ‘Uqlā’ ash-Shu’aybī said,

 

"...And I especially encourage our brother scholars to fear Allah in these times and to uphold that which Allah has obligated upon them of standing firm for the truth and clarifiying the important dangerous affairs to the people.[using large font size is not allowed]

 

æóÅöÃó ÃóÎóÃó Çááøåõ ãöíËóÇÞó ÇáøóÃöíäó ÃõæÊõæÇú ÇáúßöÊóÇÈó áóÊõÈóíøöäõäøóåõ áöáäøóÇÓö æóáÇó ÊóßúÊõãõæäóåõ[using large font size is not allowed]

And [remember] when we took the covenant from those to whom the book was given that they should clarify it for the people and not conceal it[using large font size is not allowed].

Sūrah āl-‘Imrān, (3)187

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Sounds like the establishment is ensuring the propogation of the establishment...how much critical thought is allowed in this system?

...

Why have the Scholars failed to do this...if they are rightly guided?

Having heritage isn't the same as being held back by antiquated systems of development. I'm sure that because of the time that has elapsed between the time of the Prophet and now means that many many individuals carry the capacity to pass on the baton of scholarship. It is also worth noting that during the golden age of Islam it appears there was still this system in place.

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:sl:

 

[at] brother Odobknarf, I beg to disagree with you there.

The only reason that the Muslim ummah is behind and in a bad position, is because of our neglegence in our deen.

 

We look at the lives of the Sahabah (companions of the Prophet), radiallahu 'anhum. What did they have? What were they up against? They were outnumbered by a lot, yet still they progressed, and excelled. This was only possible because of their mujahadah (sacrifice of time, wealth, and health for deen). Allah ta'ala is pleased with them, and gave them victory in all aspects: worldly as well as spiritually.

 

Same promise of Allah ta'ala holds for us too. In fact, even if we do 10% of what the Sahabah did in terms of their individual and collective practice of Islam, we would be ranked in a similar manner (it's a famous hadith, please ask for source if u should inquire).

 

The Qur'an is a comprehensive book. Allah ta'ala has not left us without guidance. Rasulullah sallallaahu 'alaihi wa sallaam has demonstrated to us what a perfect life should be like, and the Sahabah (may Allah be pleased with them) demonstrated to the world what a perfect society should be like (Madinah). We have gone far away from emulating their footsteps. I urge everyone to read Hayatus Sahabah (in arabic/english/urdu, whichever u prefer), and reflect upon the lives of the Sahabah. In fact, it's incredible how they faced similar situations to us. They delt with them in the right manner, and left examples for us that way.

 

In the glorious Qur'an, Allah ta'ala repeatedly talks about good deeds, and compares this world to the next. I agree that there are confusion among the ummah about what's right and what's wrong in deeni matters. However, we can not blame it all on the Scholars. There are plenty of clarifying materials, but how many are there to seek? Individually we are far behind in embracing this deen of Islam, and this is what has caused so much dismay in our lives as Muslims.

 

If Allah is happy with us, He would show us ways to establish peace, no question about it.

 

"O you who Believe. If you help Allah, Allah will help you; and establish your feet firmly." [47: 07]

 

Therefore, the primary objective of every Muslim should be to rectifying their own shortcomings, and Allah ta'ala will open pathways for each one of us.

 

Ameen.

 

:sl:

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:sl:

 

[at] brother Odobknarf, I beg to disagree with you there.

 

The only reason that the Muslim ummah is behind and in a bad position, is because of our neglegence in our deen.

 

Ameen.

:sl:

 

Salaam Walaikum

 

I am curious about this answer, each person must be personably responsible for their Iman and morality, ok, who is controlling the collective Iman and morality?

Do are scholars not have the greatest influence in this, do not the majority of people consult them, or are all using thier own verdicts and this is the cause of separations in the Deen?

 

Walaikum Salaam

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[at] brother Odobknarf, I beg to disagree with you there.

The only reason that the Muslim ummah is behind and in a bad position, is because of our neglegence in our deen.

 

We look at the lives of the Sahabah (companions of the Prophet), radiallahu 'anhum. What did they have? What were they up against? They were outnumbered by a lot, yet still they progressed, and excelled. This was only possible because of their mujahadah (sacrifice of time, wealth, and health for deen). Allah ta'ala is pleased with them, and gave them victory in all aspects: worldly as well as spiritually.

...

...

...

 

Therefore, the primary objective of every Muslim should be to rectifying their own shortcomings, and Allah ta'ala will open pathways for each one of us.

 

Thank you brother, for your thoughtful response. There is much truth in what you have said. I do not mean to belittle our individual roles, in fact I mean for us to take more responsibility for ourselves by not relying so heavily on the scholars. I believe this was the root cause of the decline of Islam which started around the 11th century.

 

One significant difference between Islam and Christianity is our direct connectedness with God. We do not need a priest to intercede for us. We are directly 'in contact' with God. In a similar vein, we do not need to interpret everything through scholars. We do not need an intercessor for understanding to the point where we abdicate our own reason.

 

Many people on this forum have said some very insightful things about Islam without consulting a scholar for it. Now consider the difference in our own mind development. One, where an answer is spoonfed, and no matter who it is, no matter how learned the scholar may be, the answer he gives will still be his opinion...not necessarily God's. And consider the other scenario, where you have taken it upon yourself to put in the hours necessary to gain understanding. In this scenario, we have to think about our own answers with the result that we gain insights that can only come from reflection, not from simply 'receipt of answers'.

 

The reason why our Deen slipped is because we, as individuals, as unique Muslims, got lazy. We were too lazy to really read the Qur'an, too lazy to really investigate and understand the hadith on our own...we relied on the scholars to do that part of the work for us.

 

Which society will have an Ummah whose Deen is solid; both collectively and individually. The society where we are intellectually lazy and spoonfed, or the one where we individually strive to learn for ourselves along with guidance from the scholars and not abdication to them. The moment we abdicated to the scholars, we no longer owned our Deen...the scholars did. The fault is our own.

 

Do you not think it is in the interest of the scholars to be reliant on them, or do you think it is in their interest for us to self-develop? Under which scenario will they have more power?

Edited by odobknarf

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:sl:

 

Do you not think it is in the interest of the scholars to be reliant on them, or do you think it is in their interest for us to self-develop? Under which scenario will they have more power?

 

We should have much respect and reverence for Scholars, as they are the heirs of the Prophet in terms of knowledge.

 

You see, the jobs of the scholars is to simplifyy the Ahkaam (orders/rulings) of the Qur'an and Ahadith. I try reading the meaning of the Qur'an every day, and it's very easy to understand in most places, especially the part about hereafter, the importance of righteousness, etc. At the same time, the Qur'an has 500 or so verses that relate to ahkaam/rulings. I could not possibly come to a reliable conclusion until I explored the historical context, the input of the Prophet (peace be upon him) himself in the issue, etc. For this reason, I would rather rely on an expert. Alhamdulillah Allah has made it easy, by giving the scholars of the early generation the tawfiq/ability to compile such ahkaam in simplified forms. Most of the scholars today would not give ijtihaad/qualified verdict on their own, rather they would reiterate what the early scholars have compiled (unless the topic at hand is a contemporary one and never explored before).

 

Thus, it makes a lot of sense to me to get clarification on ahkaam from the Scholars. Also, the scholars can do as much as conveying them to us. We are still liable to practice upon them. I personally believe there are external factors that are affecting us (i.e. the environment we live in/peers we associate with) that increase our neglegence in practicing the deen, rather than it being due to relying on scholars.

 

It's true however, that sometimes religious people (scholar, or otherwise) set bad example by not following the deen 100%. Example, one does his salaah, yet backbites. Non-practicing people use such people as examples of bad-religiousity, and unfortunately get turned away from the beautiful deen. I believe the more we adopt the deen, the more beautiful it will become in the eyes of others. (proven historically in the era of the sahabah).

 

Allah knows best.

 

:sl:

Edited by k-meleon

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:sl:

 

I agree with brother k-meleon, there is no need for people to become their own jurists or historians.

 

"One, where an answer is spoonfed, and no matter who it is, no matter how learned the scholar may be, the answer he gives will still be his opinion...not necessarily God's."

 

This shows that you don't know how Islamic exegesis is done. In fact, the Prophet(pbuh) said, whoever interprets the Qur'an only based on his opinion can take his place in the Hellfire.

 

Plus, I disagree with brother odobknarf, practicing Muslims are indeed constantly reflecting on their own. I personally ponder upon the Qur'an on my own, but I also read its exegesis done by scholars. Nobody is force-fed or spoon-fed anything. In the end, people decide themselves what to believe in. Scholars don't have us in a mental lock, quite to the contrary, they usually have the keys to open those locks.

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I would think a simple test would be to question a scholar.

 

If there is any issue in which you have question, and the scholar has a strong opinion about, ask them how they come to that conclusion. Ask them for the Hadith or the part of the Quran that led them to come to their conclusion. Then use their response to decide how scholarly you think they are.

 

If someone simply says "here is a Hadith and this is what it means" then that should not be enough. A true scholar should be able to give background information on it and be able to explain their interpretation in detail and also be able to answer any doubts you may have as to their interpretation.

 

I don't think any type of scholar should be held as being infallible or all knowing. As such, all scholars should welcome those who want to learn and those that want to question what they believe and how they came to believe it. After all, would there be Islam today if people in the past did not question their beliefs?

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What you have written Livius is perfectly reasonable and encouraged; scholars don't shy away from questions. I, for example, have always recieved satisfactory explanations to questions I've asked.

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We should have much respect and reverence for Scholars, as they are the heirs of the Prophet in terms of knowledge.

As you are well aware, there are many different schools of thought that scholars belong to. Many of them are openly at odds with each other on both interpretation and approach. By this reasoning, if one group differs with another, and I don't mean on minor things, I mean on some basic fundamentals, it follows they cannot all be 'heirs of the Prophet in terms of knowledge.' It is also in each groups interest to say 'they are the rightly guided school.'

 

For example, I go to different Masjids for Jummah prayers, and depending on the Imam, you get a very different sermon with vastly different approaches. At one sermon, all I hear is how we should say a certain dua at every chance we get, while we drive, when in an elevator, when waiting in line. This is the kind of thinking that has got us to where we are now. At another sermon, I hear more enlightened sermons, like speaking of local relevant issues in our community in an Islamic context. These two imams have very different approaches with a very different effect on community. But if we don't think critically, we may simply accept the emphasis of the former group of imams, while neglecting the practicality of the latter group.

 

Generally speaking, the overall milieu or school of scholarship that has been partially responsible for guiding the decay of Islam has been the group that has put its emphasis on ritual rather than reasoned understanding. All thought comes at the expense of another thought. So, if we are too busy worrying about the length of our beards, or the length of our trousers, or whether we should move our tongue or not while we recite...well...it will invariably be at the expense of what really counts...on how we can contribute to our personal development and to the world at large.

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Assalamuy alaykum

 

Generally speaking, the overall milieu or school of scholarship that has been partially responsible for guiding the decay of Islam has been the group that has put its emphasis on ritual rather than reasoned understanding. All thought comes at the expense of another thought. So, if we are too busy worrying about the length of our beards, or the length of our trousers, or whether we should move our tongue or not while we recite...well...it will invariably be at the expense of what really counts...on how we can contribute to our personal development and to the world at large.

 

1. Islam has flourished not DECAYED under true scholars.

2. Scholars should be allowed to speak freely. The management do not allow them to speak on current affairs. Will our friend allow the scholar to give a sermon on what we see on TV, Women without hijab, boys and girls flirting, free mixing of men and women, interest, etc. Since those subjects are not allowed, they have to find subjects which will not hurt any one.

3. Regarding length of beards and length of trousers, that is also part of deen, the scholars do have right to speak on that.

 

Alhamdulillah in India we have scholars who guiding the ummah, and the ummah is progressing.

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Walaikum Salam

 

1. Islam has flourished not DECAYED under true scholars.

Very true...the operative word being TRUE scholars. Look at the unprecendented 'explosion' of Islam during the first 4 caliphates. It's unparalleled in history. But the fact is that Islam is presently at its lowest depths (and I'm not sure if it has bottomed out yet), especially in the last few centuries. So, by your own logic, wouldn't that imply that we have not been under the leadership of 'true scholars' for the last few hundred years? That's my point. I"m not saying it's the only factor, but it is a significant factor. You see, for a reformation of Islam to occur, a reformation of thought must occur first...and traditionally that's been in the domain of the scholars.

 

2. Scholars should be allowed to speak freely. The management do not allow them to speak on current affairs. Will our friend allow the scholar to give a sermon on what we see on TV, Women without hijab, boys and girls flirting, free mixing of men and women, interest, etc. Since those subjects are not allowed, they have to find subjects which will not hurt any one.

I can imagine the situation in India must be tough for muslims. I speak to many Muslims from India, who still make regular visits there, and they have told me the kind of prejudice muslims experience there...except if you are in Bollywood. :sl:

 

The subjects you mention above are very very important...because that is what causes us to be misguided and lost in the Dunya, especially our youth...and it's very difficult to escape because we are literally surrounded by it. I live in the West, and I look at what I see around me and get very disgusted how God is not mentioned at all (mind you, the West has a lot of good as well).

 

But in our Masjids the imams are free to discuss whatever they like...there are no restrictions. For example, a friend of mine I keep in touch with, told me how in his community a father had recently killed his teenage daughter for refusing to wear the hijab. Apparently the imam there went out of his way to denounce such an undescribably act; which I was very pleased to hear. But my question is, how did this man think the hijab is so important as to kill his daughter over it? I'm not saying he got this idea from scholars per se, but it does illustrate a very major problem with our understanding of Deen. However, I'm not completely naive...it may be the media blamed it on the hijab, when in fact the man might of did it in a fit of rage.

 

3. Regarding length of beards and length of trousers, that is also part of deen, the scholars do have right to speak on that.

This is a whole new different subject matter, and if you like, you may open a new thread on this. I personally think there is a major misconception about this very issue...propogated by the scholars.

 

Alhamdulillah in India we have scholars who guiding the ummah, and the ummah is progressing.

I hope it's progressing in the correct way, though what that is, is a matter of opinion.

 

Peace.

Edited by odobknarf

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:sl:

 

Firstly, I would like to renew my intention on posting to this thread. I pray to Allah He protects me from fueling any fitnah, or creating disunity in our hearts. Whatever the truth may be, may Allah open it to us, and make us able to accept it. We are in need of Him for guidance.

 

[at] both brother Livius, and brother odobknarf,

from what I have learned about Islamic scholarship, and derviation of rulings, unlike 2+2=4, there arn't always one correct answer.

 

What does that mean? i.e. different outcome based on sound ijtihad is fine.

 

There are few reasons for this. Firstly, we see in the presence of the Prophet (peace be upon him) a group of sahabi heading from one place to the other, and were given certain instructions about prayer. The instruction was interpreted differently. One group ended up praying asr while on journey, the other group prayed asr prayer (beyond time) after they reached the destination.

 

Both group considered their interpretation of the Prophet's (pbuh) instruction to be correct. When the matter was brought to the Prophet peace be upon him, he said both were right. In other words, when there is room for various interpretation, then if qualified scholars make ijtihad, and they differ, then it's not a matter of one being wrong, and the other being right, as they both could be considered correct in the sight of Allah, and thus worthy of acceptance.

 

Another reason being, when a Mujtahid (person qualified to give ijtihad) makes a mistake in his judgement with regards to certain Ahkaam (ruling), the Mujtahid still gets a reward, and not punished for it.

 

How do general population play a role in this? Firstly, we can follow a qualified Imam, and a sound school of thought, no problem with that. What if the ijihad of the person is wrong? Well, there is no way to consider an ijtihad is wrong in most cases, as all parties are using the same text - but with varying perspective for interpretation (or various methodology). Secondly, the general population won't be penalised by Allah, because the Mujtahid themselves are not penalised for a wrong judgement, so of course the general population is free from such blame.

 

Also, Allah commands us to seek help from those that know the matter in hand. Therefore, we seek the help from scholars, and Allah will make it sufficient for us.

 

The most important thing in this world is Hidayah (guidance). Guidance is achieved when we desire it, ask for it from Allah, and make an effort to acquire it. The Scholars of the salaf (early generation) have made it easy for us laymen to see what Allah's command is in every situation. If we embrace Allah's commands in every aspects of our lives, inshaAllah we will be successful in this world, and also the next. I personally think both approach of the two Imams of the masjid that br. odobknarf mentioned is necessary. Our deen (religion/way of life) is comprehensive and encompasses all aspects of our lives. There are benefits in focussing on du'as of everyday deeds, and also there are benefits in community-works. We appreciate the good in both and implement them in our lives inshaAllah.

 

With regards to analysing a scholar's opinion, I know why one may be interested in doing that. It is a desire to seek the 'stronger opinion'. Personally though, I feel it's not a reliable approach at looking at Islamic jurisprudence. Firstly because there arn't always a 'stronger opinion' but rather a 'different (but sound) opinion' (due to a different methodology of interpretation). Secondly, to judge that a scholar's opinion is 'correct/strong' etc, one has to be able to distinguish between strong and weak evidence. For example, two doctors are performing surgeries on a kidney: one says method A is better, and the other says method B is better. Unless I know of human anatomy well, I am not in a position to come to a sound conclusion. It would most often be a peer influence, or limited-understanding that I would make my decision on. Yes, if I was also a doctor, then I could distinguish the strength and follies of the both methods. Similar is the case with 'judging' two ijtihaads.

 

Allah knows best.

:sl:

Edited by k-meleon

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...

...

...

Assalamu Alaikum brother k-meleon,

 

And thank you for your post. I do not discount what you have said...but I feel I have not made myself clear enough; we are discussing things from two different approaches. When I speak of scholarship, and the general school of scholarship that is prevalent, I am referring to a top-down approach. I am referring to the forest. The type of thought exhibited at the top level of scholarship and how that permeates down to local scholarship which then affects the imams...which then affect us individually at a community level.

 

What I am saying is, that at the very top level, the prevailing school of scholarship has concentrated on rituals over moral conduct along with a distinct lack of stress on contemporary but Islamic based education. And this has been one of the contributing factors in the decay of Islam. And therefore, it is this change that is required in the Islamic world, so that it affects all of Islam in all countries and is not limited to borders. Limiting Islam to borders would continue the last several hundred years unwitting pattern of playing into the hands of the West, which has specifically introduced borders and nation-states as a divide and conquer strategy to prevent muslim unity and make us a diluted and ineffective force.

 

This is one of the root issues, and it is this I am trying to address. The prevalent school of scholarship, at the very top level, must summon and invogorate a change in emphasis of thought...from ritual based thinking to progressive education based thinking...and one that promotes unity across Muslims and focuses on that which we have in common...which is the Shahada. The prevailing school of Islamic thought has been doing, for the last several hundred years at least, exactly the opposite - and by doing so, contributing significantly to our present condition.

 

Look, no one wants to hear what I'm saying...but as Muslims we must dig deep, and face reality, if we are to change our situation. Nothing short of facing the absolute truth will do the job - however unpleasant we may find it.

Edited by odobknarf

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Assalamu Alaikum, sorry for the late reply to this post, I see that this thread is also going away from the original question asked by seacow.

 

Seacow, in your question, if you meant to ask what type of studies a person has to go through to become a Scholar of Islamic Studies, then below is the Syllabus followed by the Islamic Universities (Daar-ul-Ulooms) where 2 of my sons have finished their studies and 2 are still studying.

 

Being a Hafiz (someone who memorized the whole Qur'aan) is not a requirement to become a Scholar of Islamic Studies, but recommended. Memorization of Qur'aan could take anywhere from 1 to 3 years or a bit more depending on the person's ability to memorize.

 

• Aalim Course/Scholar of Islamis Studies : 6 years Course

 

The following is a summary of the syllabus of the Aalim course:

 

First Year: Learning Arabic, mainly Sarf and Nahw.

Second Year: Continue with learning Arabic, Fiqh, Usool-e-Fiqh and Tarjuma-e-Qur’aan

Third Year: Usool-e-Fiqh, Tarjuma-e-Qur’aan, History

Fourth Year: Fiqh, Usool-e-Fiqh, Tafseer

Fifth Year: Hadith, Usool-e-Hadith, Fiqh

Sixth Year: Sihaah-e-Sitta (The six most authentic compilations of Ahadeeth)

 

In addition if someone wants to study further, then the courses below can be taken. These are specialized courses, which enhance the knowledge of the Scholar.

 

• Mufti course: minimum 2 years

• Specialty in Hadith: (Takhassus fil Hadith) 1 year

• Qadhaa (Islamic judiciary): 1 year after the Mufti course

 

I would like to add here that a True Scholar is usually free from arrogance and is full of humility.

 

A very special person who is a Hafiz, when he finished his Aalim course told me that what he had really learnt in the 9 years of his studies is that he does'nt really know much, and the knowledge he gained is not even equal to a drop in the Ocean.

 

If a person who has studied for 9 years can say this, where do the ordinary Muslims stand?????

 

I hope this gives you a small glimpse of what is involved in the studies. If there is any furthur question please feel free to ask, inshaAllah I will try to answer you.

 

Salaams, umAhmad.

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Assalamu alaykum.

 

Sister UmAhamed has posted the critiera of becoming a scholar.

 

Regarding br odobknarf post. He speaks of top-down aproach, the problem here is bottom-top aproach is non-existing. First the ummah should accept the scholars as our leaders.

 

It is something like this; a school child in his basic maths questions a Phd in maths about validity of existence of a number divided by zero. This young boy doesn't know about limits, differentiation, integration and other higher maths. The similar tragedy exist in ummah today. Pick a hadith and a quranic ayah (in out of context) and question the rulings of the scholars. The height of it is that they are questioning the rulings of Imam Abu haneefa, Imam shafayee, Imam Malik and Imam Ahamed bin Hanbal. If that is the case how can the scholar can come forward and lead the ummah. Our ancestors were at the pinnacle when they respected the scholars, blindly took their commands and implemented in their lives. But today the office boy has more respect than the scholars.

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Regarding br odobknarf post. He speaks of top-down aproach, the problem here is bottom-top aproach is non-existing. First the ummah should accept the scholars as our leaders.

...

...

...

....But today the office boy has more respect than the scholars.

brother ahamed_sharif, please go to this thread and read it in its entirety:

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetgawaher(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/index.php?showtopic=140083&pid=568369&st=0entry568369"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetgawaher(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/index.php?showtopic...mp;#entry568369[/url]

 

and then let's talk.

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