Jump to content
Islamic Forum
ummammaar

Islam in Italy

Recommended Posts

PropellerAds

Salaam,

 

Went to Rome with my family in Summer 2003. There's a nice big Masjid there (though on the outskirts). They have stalls and sell kebabs :D outside. It was nice seeing the number of Muslims there for Jumu'ah (maybe 300? not sure...) as I don't think I saw many in the centre. Strange hearing the khutbah in Italian as well as Arabic!

 

There were plenty of Bengali locals selling tourists t-shirts, jewellery, handbags, cold drinks etc.

 

Lonely Planet says that in August that the beaches are avoided because of the heat. This isn't true! :D (Just in case anyone goes thinking they'll enjoy the coast without the fitnah... unfortunately, we found out the hard way.)

 

Wassalaam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am not Muslim :D so i am not the best person to tell you about Muslim in Italy, all i can tell you is that there are no particular problems and they live there pacefully .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings Venier!

 

i am not Muslim :D so i am not the best person to tell you about Muslim in Italy, all i can tell you is that there are no particular problems and they live there pacefully .

 

 

Come on bro! you could at least tell us if there are many masjids in Italy...or if you know of any in Sicily :P

 

Peace :D !

AS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:D

 

From my own personal research of the area:

 

bestofsicily(contact admin if its a beneficial link)']In Sicily, Islam was inextricably bound to Arab culture, though not all the world's Muslims were Arab. The Arabs ruled Sicily for two centuries. Most of the Muslims in Sicily were Saracens (Moors). More precisely, many were the descendants of Sicilian women who had wed the conquering Moors, each of whom, under Koranic law, could take as many as four wives. Many churches and synagogues survived (though new ones could not be built), and not every Sicilian woman chose to wed a Muslim, despite the economic advantages implicit in such a marriage. As recently as the 13th century, there were Muslims at the royal court (popes referred to Frederick II as a "baptized sultan"), and the Muslim towns in Sicily were essentially Arabic in every way, not unlike the Muslim towns in Spain. There is evidence to suggest that Frederick II considered his Muslim soldiers more loyal than many of his unruly Christian knights and barons. Certain Muslim customs (veiling, fasting) were essentially similar to practices that had been known among Middle Eastern Jews and Christians, and Islam's Koranic scriptures and precepts were not completely divorced from Judeo-Christian ones. Fasting (during Ramadan), almsgiving (zakat), pilgrimage and even Mohammed's visit by the angel Gabriel are essential elements of Islam. The Muslims respected Jews and Christians as "people of the book." Adopting a practice of the Muslim emirs, some of Sicily's Norman kings kept harems. In Palermo alone, there were over a hundred Masjids and Koranic schools, and hundreds of imams, when the Normans arrived. By the time the Jews were expelled or Christianized (1492), there appear to have been very few professed Muslims in Sicily for nearly two centuries, beginning with Frederick II's exile of some of them to Apulia for armed insurrection in 1246. Sicily's Muslims converted a number of churches to Masjids, and the Normans, in turn, rebuilt some of these as churches. Arab architects designed these in what has come to be known as the "Norman-Arab" style. (An Arabic inscription is visible around the high cupola of the Martorana Church in Palermo.) On the present site of Palermo Cathedral and its courtyard once stood Sicily's largest Masjid, and before that a Paleo Christian basilica. A number of churches in central Palermo were built on the sites of Masjids. In keeping with this peculiar architectural tradition, the Archdiocese of Palermo some years ago gave a former church to the city's growing Muslim community for use as a Masjid.

 

:D

AS

 

"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.bestofsicily(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/religion.htm"]Source[/url]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:D

 

...and more:

 

East meets west in Sicily 

 

A one-time Arab emirate and jewel in the Moorish crown Sicily is breathing a new wind of Islamic culture. We take a trip through modern Muslim Sicily and discover a land when past and present mix . . .

 

Sicily's strategic position in the Mediterranean has made it a cultural crossroads washed over by successive waves of invaders. On this island, between the 9th and 12th centuries AD, two great civilisations - the Arabs and the Normans - met and mingled laying the basis of the Sicily of today.

 

We start our journey in Palermo, whose very name - from the Arab Balarm - defines its origins. The city, a one-time Arab emirate, was described in 973 as "the city of the 300 Masjids" by the eminent Arab traveller and explorer Ibn Hawqal. Wherever you look there are signs of the city's heyday as a capital of the Islamic, and consequently Norman kingdoms. Modern Islamic culture occupies a much humbler place in Palermo. The 300 Masjids have diminished to but 1 which is housed in a deconsecrated church in Palermo's inner city. The church, San Paolino dei Giardinieri, was badly damaged during WW2 and was given to the council by the diocese and is now run by the Tunisian government.

Its a short walk from the Masjid to Palermo's architecturally eclectic Cathedral. Built in 604 AD as a Christian temple it was given 'facelifts' by both Moors and Normans with the last (disastrous) restoration taking place in the 18th Century. Take a close look at the columns that flank the main entrance. Arab scholars will recognise verses from the Koran. Perhaps the finest example of Arab-Norman art in Sicily is the Cappella Palatina in Piazza della Vittoria, a few minutes' walk from the Cathedral. The chapel is a magnificent showcase of Arab-Norman art with its breath-taking Byzantine mosaics rivalled only by those in Istanbul and Ravenna.

Another church well worth a visit is Chiesa di San Giovanni degli Eremiti - which was built on the remains of an Arab Masjid. From there we then head towards La Zisa (from the Arab al-aziz meaning noble and magnificent). This splendid Arab-Norman castle was built in the 12th Century as the King's summer residence. You can visit the museum which houses an impressive collection of Islamic artefacts from the Mediterranean basin.

 

Mazara del Vallo

We now leave the capital and go south-west towards Mazara del Vallo. This is where the Moors landed in 827 AD when they first set about their conquest of Sicily. Nowadays the town boasts some 5,000 Tunisians - an impressive 10% of the total population - most of whom live in the casbah, the old Arab quarter. The town's Moorish past is still evident in the remains of the original Masjid, the streets and courtyards of the San Francesco and Giudecca Quarters, and the domes of two beautiful Arab-Norman churches: Sant'Egidio e del Carmine and San Nicolò Regale (which is known locally as Santa Niculicchia). Walk around and savour the sights, sounds and smells which seem to come straight from the pages of "Arabian Nights".

 

Catania's modern Masjid

Our journey now brings us to Catania on the eastern coast of Sicily and into the modern world of Islam. Indeed Catania is home to Italy's first modern Masjid, which was opened in 1980 and was shortly followed by the Masjids in Milan (1988) and Rome (1995). The Masjid, which is dedicated to Khalif Omar, was designed by an Egyptian architect and financed by the Libyan government but the initial idea was promoted by a local lawyer Michele Papa who recognised the need of the city's Arab population. It's a pity that the Islamic congregation didn't appreciate the Latin dedication to Papa on the Masjid's imposing entrance and chose to relocate to a somewhat shoddier structure close to the port.

 

 

by ELENA GUARNERI

Feb. 15th, 2002

 

"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.italiaplease(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/eng/megazine/giroditalia/2002/02/Islam/"]Source[/url]

 

:D

AS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aye in sicily you can find almost 2300 years of history, from the ancients greek colonies... to the fenicies colonies...roman cities.... to mhhhh i think every civilization have been in sicily .... the result is a wonderfull mix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings Venier,

 

Have you ever been to Sicily? I would like to go, my roots and last name come from Sicily. I'd be curious to know your experience with the island. I know that it wasn't considered a part of Italy until WW1, but I have a difficult time learning more about the island because most websites about it are in italian! ha, naturally.

 

:D

 

Peace,

AS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know of any Masjids in the Cities?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

e.g. Rome, Milan - I have always wanted to visit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the Muslim community like in Italy - is there a community?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:D

 

We are planning on going to Italy to see one of my best friends in Ariano Iripino. She taught me Italian sense my first language is spanish Italian is sooo easy for me.

 

i want to go all over italy it's sooo beautiful but to see muslims there would be fantastik!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:D

 

We are planning on going to Italy to see one of my best friends in Ariano Iripino. She taught me Italian sense my first language is spanish Italian is sooo easy for me.

 

i want to go all over italy it's sooo beautiful but to see muslims there would be fantastik!!!

 

salam sis!

 

oh yeah italy is a pretty cool place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Salam brothers n sisters.

I actually lived in Italy for 7 years, even though Im originally Indian. Now Im currently been living in Canada.

Muslims in Italy are very few, and mostly they are brothers from North African countries or the Arab peninsula. Ive traveled to Milan, Turin, Pisa, Venice and so on.

In the north, few muslims really practise, and the community is scattered and weak. In the south though there are much more muslims. The masjid in Rome is said to be the biggest one in Europe.

Well, I still have contact with some of my frirnds from there, so I could get more information on the situation there. I still miss Italy, but the Islamic environment is wayyyy better here in Toronto. May Allah bring guidance to all of us.

Waleikum assalam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have read from Internet sources that in the migrant communites Islam is growing.

 

Islamophobia is also growing here .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Islamophobia is also growing here .

 

Salams,

who are you being disrespectful?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salams,

who are you being disrespectful?

 

Me??

It's just an info regarding Islam in Italy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Salams,

sorry but i won't forgive your attitude. I think you've changed. You were more like a friend to me before.

 

But still i should give the good news! I met with an italian who is muslim in that sufism center i told you before. She is working in an italian course and she is a teacher there. I phoned her and we talked ( she knows Turkish :sl: ). I asked her questions and she answered about this course. I think i'm gonna take italian lessons for 2 months. Today the course is closed because of the weekend but on monday i am going to start it inshallah! :sl: ( That's what i plan)

Edited by muzur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salams,

sorry but i won't forgive your attitude. I think you've changed. You were more like a friend to me before.

 

What's wrong with what I said ?

It's just reality here.

 

But still i should give the good news! I met with an italian who is muslim in that sufism center i told you before. She is working in an italian course and she is a teacher there. I phoned her and we talked ( she knows Turkish :sl: ). I asked her questions and she answered about this course. I think i'm gonna take italian lessons for 2 months. Today the course is closed because of the weekend but on monday i am going to start it inshallah! :no: ( That's what i plan)

 

 

wow

It's great.

I'm really happy for you.

:sl:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Salams,

with Islamaphobia word, do you mean the "fear" of Islam? If so, sorry, i got you wrong then :sl:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:sl:

 

Recently, I learned that the Italians have had a longtime history of hatred for Muslims. (Take their invasion of Libya, for instance.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

assalamu alaikum

i love italy and i dream of going there for tourism

i'm planning to learn italian too..they say it's a very beautiful language..

salam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×