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Camels In Australia

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:D

 

 

australia is the home of the largest population of wild camels in the world. they roam our deserts as their ancestors once did in arabia.

 

it has always been in my mind to ride one some distance in the aussie outback......

 

the link below gives more info.

 

(www.)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.deh.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/publications/camel/"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.deh.gov.au/biodiversity/invasiv...ications/camel/[/url]

 

 

:D

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PropellerAds

:D

 

i believe their is a business opportunity to export halal camel meat to traditional marketplaces, as we do with feral goats. feral pigs are sold to germany.

 

:D

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australia is the home of the largest population of wild camels in the world. they roam our deserts as their ancestors once did in arabia.

 

it has always been in my mind to ride one some distance in the aussie outback......

 

the link below gives more info.

 

http://www.deh.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/publications/camel/

 

:sl:

 

Seems their website have broken links including :

 

Feral camel ( Camelus dromedarius ) - Fact sheet

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/publications/camel-factsheet.html

 

 

though this one works :

http://www.environment.gov.au/resource/national-feral-camel-action-plan

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i believe their is a business opportunity to export halal camel meat to traditional marketplaces, as we do with feral goats. feral pigs are sold to germany.

 

 

47:23 198 likes, 24 dislikes

45,882 views

Al Jazeera English

01/01/13

Published on Jan 1, 2013

Wild camels in Australia are being culled because they are perceived to be an environmental problem and pests to farmers.

Al Jazeera World goes to South Australia with Qatari businessman Ali Sultan Al Hajri to find a solution to mass killings.

Documentary, News

Standard YouTube License

Partner rating: No mature

content (Learn more)

Al Jazeera World

Season 2013 Ep. 2

Released: 01/02/13

Running time: 47:23

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I try using iframe:

[iframe]http://youtube.com/watch?v=mlTTgjYAFR0[/iframe]

Edited: it does not work. So, I delete the "iframe" line.

Edited by MarineLiner

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cameleers_port.jpg

AustralianGeographic.com.au – History

BY EMMA YOUNG | FEBRUARY 19, 2010

 

From 1860, 20,000 camels and their handlers from Afghanistan and Pakistan were shipped to Australia.

MORE THAN ONE MILLION feral dromedary camels are wandering around the Australian outback, stripping vegetation and knocking down fences.

They’re viewed as pests, and there are plans to cull them. But their ability to flourish in some of the harshest, driest conditions in the world was the very reason their ancestors were brought here.

From the 1860s to the 1920s, an estimated 20,000 camels and more than 2000 cameleers – men skilled in handling them – were shipped to Australia from Afghanistan and Pakistan, according to a new exhibition at the Immigration Museum in Melbourne.

 

Read more . . . . .

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Because I use samsung galaxy tab with opera mini browser, I can't see youtube in any post in this forum.

 

Then I try to use mozila firefox and it works,

 

the link I want to display is:

 

 

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AIBD TV Award 2013 for Best TV Programme on Cross-cultural Communication

Directed by Yasir Khan, broadcast by Al-Jazeera (Qatar)

Camels in the Outback

2_18.preview.jpg

Mr Yasir Khan of Al-Jazeera, Qatar delivers his award acceptance message

 

AIBD TV AWARD 2013 on “The Best TV Programme on Cross-Cultural Exchange”

“Camels in the Outback”

Al Jazeera - Qatar

This documentary looks at a Qatari camel herder who heads to Australia to witness the mass killing of camels, considered no longer useful to the state.

SOURCE: AIBD TV AWARD 2013

 

comment:

2006 »»» camels inspired this thread.

2013 »»» "Camels in the Outback" is the Best TV Programme on Cross-cultural Communication.

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somalifarm farmkids (Jan 21, 2013)

Asalama alaikum brother I'm a farmer and agronomist in Australia. Come and get them, I will help you, I see them running wild on a daily basis. So beautiful to see them, but they just won't stop shooting them. If some people get together to organise and invest, it could be different. Email me on: ckennard[at]agrinet.com.au

 

isamabuhasabu (Jul 27, 2013)

Mr>Hajeree. I share your compassion for the poor animals. If you are looking for an investor in camels ,instead of wasting them in this unmerciful manner, I WILL GLAD TO INTO ANY VENTURE WITH YOU . I have good ideas . Please contact me if interested. Isam Abu Hasabu . email./isamabuhasabu[at]gmail.com

 

http://youtube.medjed.org/video/al-jazeera-world-camels-in-the-outback--mlTTgjYAFR0.html

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ali-s-alhajri-flyflow_1390807605688-1.jp

 

:sl:

Mr. Ali S. AlHajri has phone number displayed on the camels website.

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Hi MarineLiner

 

Australia is home to a large range of unique wildlife, wildlife found nowhere else on earth.  Much of that wildlife is threatened with extinction because of the introduction of ferals such as cats, dogs, rabbits, goats, water buffalo, camels etc.  I believe that this country would be far better off if every single feral animal was killed.  That means every camel that is not held domestically, every goat, every rabbit in fact every introduced animal that is not managed for commercial purposes should be killed and maybe some of our highly endangered native animals would stand a chance and we could reverse the devastating trend in native wildlife brought about by our introduction of so many destructive non-native species.

 

Russell

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. . . . .  I believe that this country would be far better off if every single feral animal was killed. 

. . . . . in fact every introduced animal that is not managed for commercial purposes should be killed . . . . .

Thank you very much.

That was also said by the lady in the video.

While Paddy McHugh and Ian Conway had tried with the commercial way, but the cost is so expensive make their business can not increase fast enough to take out as many camels as possible from the wild because the demand still low.

I am wondering if we can try with a moderate way. Not just kill them but not also expecting much profit from them.

May be we can call it a non profit project?

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Hi MarineLiner

 

The trouble with the slow and steady approach is that every year we lose native species due to competition etc from ferals including camels.  If you kill of 50% of the current camel population they would breed back up to current levels in a matter of years.  Even if you killed off 90% of the population it would not take many more years for them to breed back up to current levels so softly and slowly doesn’t work especially when you take into account that we lose native species forever to extinction every single year.  Our country can’t support wild populations of these ferals for even one year.  Unfortunately eradication projects are very expensive and probably not feasible in every case as many species have proven to be too pervasive for that but given the size of Camels it may be feasible with them as it has been with the water buffalo up north and with brumbies in the high country though that’s still a work in progress due to protests from people who think they are too pretty to kill.

 

In short the softly and slowly approach means that many more camels are produced in the interim so the overall number of animals that have to be killed is far higher than simply doing the job once and for all.  Of course I have no issues with rounding up as many as possible rather than killing them, turning wild populations into controlled domestic populations largely solves the problems as well as killing the wild animals off but either method needs to be done very very soon before we lose too many more of our unique species to them forever.

 

Russell

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. . . . .

In short the softly and slowly approach means that many more camels are produced in the interim so the overall number of animals that have to be killed is far higher than simply doing the job once and for all.  Of course I have no issues with rounding up as many as possible rather than killing them, turning wild populations into controlled domestic populations largely solves the problems as well as killing the wild animals off but either method needs to be done very very soon before we lose too many more of our unique species to them forever.

Yes. You're right. It needs to be done very very soon.

And that's why I said that I regret because of I "missed the boat" when this thread was started in 2006Masihi/1426Hijri. I heard this issue in 2005 and I tried to discussed it in "Islam in Australia" but didn't meet anyone interested.

Even in these last days it's you who responded. Thank you very much.

Reading your posts, I have a hope you can help to do something toward this need.

My idea is to take them out as many as possible but in a non profit project to make it as low cost rather than common business which has to have profit.

When the project is running then the killing could be stopped and slowly but sure the demand will increase upto getting profit.

Your thought?

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Hi MarineLiner

 

My interest is the Australian environment above all else.  In that context Camels are introduced pests who cause loss of flora and fauna and that’s bad because it is often irreversible, we lose species forever due to their presence here every year.

 

The biggest hurdle to removing them is where they live, currently there are somewhere between 300000 and 1000000 camels living in the outback of Australia in an area of around 4000000 square kilometres in terrain that has very few roads and very few settlements.  The Simpson Desert, one of their strong holds, is around 176000 square kilometres and has three tracks crossing it and no roads.

 

I’ve driven across the Simpson Desert and it’s an amazing place but it takes around four days in a four wheel drive to travel between Birdsville and Mount Dare and that’s where there is a track, most of the desert does not have tracks.  The entire area contains just three main tracks, all are unpaved and largely unmaintained sand tracks, the Donohue Highway travels from the north to the centre of the desert where it meets the French Line which crosses east to west.  The French line runs in parallel with the Rig Road which loops away to the south for much of the crossing but re-joins the French Line at both ends and that’s it for main tracks in there.

 

Commercially that means that to catch a camel or kill it and haul out its carcass means traveling hundreds of kilometres from the nearest road then transporting the animal back across similarly difficult terrain.  The price of camel meat would never cover the costs involved in such work so how do you achieve that commercially?

 

Direct culling means traveling across similar tracts of uninhabited desert without roads to reach every single animal before killing it though at least in this case the carcass can be left to rot and so you don’t have the cost of transporting it out.  But the problems are still huge, the most economical way of culling animals in this sort of terrain is by air but most of that area is outside the range of helicopters as there are no facilities to refuel them within their flight range.  It’s a difficult problem whichever way you look at it.

 

In the end your idea to ‘take them out’ rather than simply shooting them turns into a huge and unprofitable undertaking.  We’re talking about possibly close to 1000000 animals spread across 400000 square kilometres of road less and settlement less desert.  I don’t believe there is any way to remove them other than by simply shooting the vast majority of them.  Sure you can round up a few hundred or a few thousand around the edge of their range but that’s probably all that can be done and it’s a drop in the ocean compared to the number of animals involved.

 

Russell

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. . . . .

In the end your idea to ‘take them out’ rather than simply shooting them turns into a huge and unprofitable undertaking.  We’re talking about possibly close to 1000000 animals spread across 400000 square kilometres of road less and settlement less desert.  I don’t believe there is any way to remove them other than by simply shooting the vast majority of them.  Sure you can round up a few hundred or a few thousand around the edge of their range but that’s probably all that can be done and it’s a drop in the ocean compared to the number of animals involved.

Thanks for describing it in details.

Yes, again youre right. It can turn into a huge and unprofitable undertaking. That's why I purposed the non profit project.

 

822512-tony-abbott.jpg

. . . . . Last year the young men of the community (there are no old men, they are all dead) got together with neighbouring pastoralist Ian Conway to catch wild camels, spending several months to muster 250 camels they sold for $50,000.

After employing a helicopter pilot, buying a car and outlays for fuel and food there was no money left for the workers.

But the men say they loved the work.

Since they sold the camels six months ago, they have been doing nothing.

 

Source: THE DAILY TELEGRAPH · MARCH 05, 2010 12:00AM

 

When those camels were introduced last time, they were used for transportation. Now, we have problem to transporting them.

That's why I am optimistic there should be a way out to manage them as transporting the transportation animals.

Sorry, I have difficulty to explain what's in my mind. I just have the spirit to do something real to be compared with waiting for or calculating "miracles".

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Hi MarineLiner

 

The project you quoted is typical of the problems involved.  Quite a few local aboriginal men were involved working for months in a project that involved hiring a helicopter etc  and in the end after months of work, they managed to capture 250 Camels which sold for less money than the project cost and I’m assuming they were working in one of the fringe areas where transport etc is easier.  250 camels out of a population that may range up to 1000000 is nothing and even with these men giving their labour for free it didn’t turn a profit.  We need to be talking about removing well over 100000 animals per year from the population but there’s no profit in that.  I can’t see any plan working other than a government funded culling program and even that is going to be very expensive.  I love the desert country here in Australia and it’s really sad to see the damage that these animals do and to hear about the native species that are gone forever because of them.

 

Russell

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Very interesting subject MarineLiner and Zukiful , I knew there were camels in Australia , and that they were not indigenous , but after hearing Russel , I had no idea how many .

   Introduction of any non-native species almost always upsets the eco-system in which they have been introduced . Ferel pigs are a huge problem in the US , as well as Pythons in Florida ,where they have no predators and are eating everything , including smaller gators . 

 

There is even a tree  from Australia that is so rapidly growing that it is pushing out native species . And if you burn them they proliferate even more as they evolved on a Continent given to wildfires , so that fires cause them to drop their seeds .

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Very interesting subject MarineLiner and Zukiful , I knew there were camels in Australia , and that they were not indigenous , but after hearing Russel , I had no idea how many .

Introduction of any non-native species almost always upsets the eco-system in which they have been introduced . Ferel pigs are a huge problem in the US , as well as Pythons in Florida ,where they have no predators and are eating everything , including smaller gators .

There is even a tree from Australia that is so rapidly growing that it is pushing out native species . And if you burn them they proliferate even more as they evolved on a Continent given to wildfires , so that fires cause them to drop their seeds .

Thank you.

 

Yes, I saw on tv about the pythons in florida.

But the rapidly growing tree I just heard it now.

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I love the desert country here in Australia and it’s really sad to see the damage that these animals do and to hear about the native species that are gone forever because of them.

 

Yes. I do see you love it, and that's why you will spend your time replying this thread.

 

We need to be talking about removing well over 100000 animals per year from the population but there’s no profit in that. I can’t see any plan working other than a government funded culling program and even that is going to be very expensive.

 

And yes, there’s no profit in that. That's why I purposed a non profit project for that.

If 250 camels need $ 50,000 then it needs 400 X 50,000 = $ 20,000.000

 

That amount is for paying the local aboriginal men who need to get work. ( sorry if this looks like "calculating miracles" ).

 

Then we need more money for transporting the camels ( which were introduced as transportation animals ).

 

In fact, indonesian have a lot of money which is still idle in the bank account of religion ministry. It's the down payment for pilgrims who want to be registered in the waiting list. I think there are about 2 millions registrar now, each pay US$ 2,000.

The problem is how to make a proposal to borrow that idle money. The minister is so afraid if the money lost.

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The Malaleuca and Australian Pine were imported to separate and protect fields of crops , as well as the Brazillian Pepper .......all backfired and caused ecological and economic problems .

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The Malaleuca and Australian Pine were imported to separate and protect fields of crops , as well as the Brazillian Pepper .......all backfired and caused ecological and economic problems .

Oh yes, the pine "family", we call it pinus in indonesia. We use them also for reforestry because their fast growth. I heard it was imported but I don't know if it from Australia.

I think they are one "family" with the christmas tree?

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Hi MarineLiner

 

I’m sure you can see the problem here, you are talking about finding 20000000 dollars to get the scheme started but that only pays for one year of it, I’m guessing it would take 8-15 years to achieve the needed results this way, and from that article the scheme only worked at that price because the men involved did not get paid so to make this work on a larger scale you’d have to find more money than that.  Of course you also have to fund the increasing cost per head as their numbers dropped over the years and as their numbers became rare around the edges of their range where transport is reasonably easy to arrange.  It’s starting to look like a very expensive “not for profit” undertaking unfortunately.

 

Russell

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