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Do you love to read books?

Do you like to read books? (other than islamic ones)  

75 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you like to read books? (other than islamic ones)

    • Yes! I love reading all sorts of books, but also islamic ones always too.
      51
    • No, I hate reading >.<
      4
    • I'll pick up a book occassionally.
      15
    • No, waste of time and shouldnt be done.
      5


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PropellerAds
trust me that book ain't bad comparing to 'to kill a mockingbird' that is just really bad  :D

 

w/s

 

:D

 

what???? those 2 books are masterpieces!!!!, inspector calls is one of the first plays to use the concept of time to create twists and turns in the story, and to kill a mockingbird accurately depicts rascism, you should read them carefully!!!!

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:D

 

what???? those 2 books are masterpieces

 

:P

 

thank you bro! CE, how can u say that book is bad (to kill a mocking bird, i've never read inspecter calls). it wicked :D I loved studying that book during my GCSE's in English Lit. I wished i could of done it for A/S but we had to do Enduring Love instead. Turned out to be a :D book. Its a film now as well.

 

anyways im sure u just had a bad teacher who didnt teach you the book properly :P

Edited by summer_girl

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when you have to analyse the darn book inside and outside it kills the fun of the book....inspector calls was alright.

 

you guys need to read the saga of Darren Shan :D

 

w/s

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assalamu alikum

 

i like reading, but don't really have time nowadays! :D

 

wa'aykum salam

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:D

 

I LUV READING!!!!!!!!!!! :D :D :P

My mum always has to really yell to get me to the dinner table before i stop reading. :P

Edited by Afghan_Hijabi

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:D

 

wow... reading. i spend so much time reading nowadays it's not funny.

my absolute favorite book was "l'etranger" or "the stranger/outsider" by albert camus. it's so jampacked full of existential ideas... i'd suggest it to anybody willing to broaden their horizons. it made me appreciate my religion a lot, but also made me question logic like anything.

and yes, i'm back.

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Salam,

In regards to reading books like Harry Potter...I looked them up and it appears to be haram. I love the books too, but Islam comes first...

This is my "proof", if anyone wants to say anything about them feel free :D.

 

From IslamOnline:

 

"I was wondering if watching and reading the “Harry Potter� series is okay? “Harry Potter� books and movies are about magic, and I know that magic is not permissible in Islam. So I just want to make sure if it is okay or not."

 

Answer:

 

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

 

All praise and thanks are due to Allah, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger.

 

Dear questioner, we commend your pursuit of knowledge and your keenness to seek what is lawful and avoid what is not. We earnestly implore Allah to bless your efforts in this honorable way.

 

‘Harry Potter’ books and movies are all about magic and mythology, and that is why reading or watching them is to be avoided. There is almost a consensus among Muslim scholars that learning magic is haram. For sure, there are many useful books and movies to read and watch other than ‘Harry Potter’. The issue becomes more dangerous when parents allow their children to watch or read such stories as it may affect their creed in their earliest years.

 

Responding to the question, Sheikh Muhammad Al-Mukhtar Al-Shinqiti, Director of the Islamic Center of South Plains, Lubbock, Texas, states the following:

 

"Traditionally, there is almost consensus among Muslim scholars that learning magic is haram. They base their argument on the verse mentioning people who learn magic: “And they learn what harms them, not what profits them. And they knew that the buyers of (magic) would have no share in the happiness of the Hereafter. And vile was the price for which they did sell their souls, if they but knew.� (Al-Baqarah: 102)

 

According to the trustworthy people who read the works of “Harry Potter� it is all about magic and mythology. Therefore, I would not advise young people to read it or parents to give it to their children.

 

The attractive way in which these works are done is very dangerous and might negatively affect the basic concept of `aqeedah or Islamic creed and values of our youth. People of knowledge recognize the impact such artistic works might have on the mind and soul. The late well-known Muslim poet, Muhammad Iqbal, is quoted to have said: “Aridity of logic cannot overwhelm the beauty of poetry.�

 

Therefore, a Muslim is advised to stay away from these attractive but poisonous works."

 

An article on Harry Potter...

 

Harry Potter: Fun to Some, Dangerous Sorcery to Others

 

By Dilshad D. Ali

 

15/11/2001

 

It started with a mother on welfare sitting at a bar in Scotland, where she suddenly had an inspiration for a magic-infused, seven-book children's series. Little did that mother know that her simple idea would snowball into an international phenomenon. With fascinating characters, numerous plot twists, and an underlying theme of good versus evil, the Harry Potter books have enticed a young video and Internet generation back to reading. But with magic and sorcery as the crux of the books, many Muslims wonder at what cost?

 

The craze has now swept the world, culminating with a media blitz surrounding the film release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (based on the first novel) this Friday. Many parents herald J. K. Rowling's remarkable books as an entertaining way to engage young minds. Yet others warn against the books' focus on sorcery, saying they teach children to admire magic, which Allah (SWT) forbids the Qur'an. Many Christian leaders also have condemned the books.

 

The Harry Potter books, four of which have been written, tell the story of - whom else? - Harry Potter, an orphan living with horrible "Muggle" (Potter-ese for non-magic people) relatives. A supremely evil wizard named Voldemort, who becomes Harry's lifelong nemesis, killed his mother and father, who were a wizard and a witch, respectively.

 

On his 11th birthday, Harry receives a letter informing him that he is also a wizard and is invited to attend the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. From there the books explore his adventures at school and his ongoing battle with Voldemort. The books' myriad fascinating characters, imaginative and intertwining plots and quirky language of magical words and spells are a sure-fire draw for readers of all ages.

 

Many Muslims, children and adults alike, are also fans of the Harry Potter series. But many of them say the key to enjoying the books is to not become obsessed and to maintain the understanding that fantasy is just fantasy. Asma Shafi, a graphic designer in New York City and Harry Potter fan, advises parents to read the books first to see if their children can enjoy them without believing in their stories of magic and spells.

 

The Qur'an and Hadith have numerous passages relating to the danger of magic and sorcery. For example, Al-Baqara (2:102) tells of evildoers trying to teach magic to lure people away from Allah (SWT): "And they knew that the buyers of (magic) would have no share in the happiness of the Hereafter. And vile was the price for which they did sell their souls, if they but knew!"

 

And a Hadith, related by Abu Huraira, recounts the seven destructive sins as told by the Prophet Muhammad (SAWS), one of which is to practice sorcery.

 

"[Magic] is definitely against Islam," Shafi says. "But as long as the child can understand that, and that the [Harry Potter] books are just a story, then they can enjoy the books."

 

Shafi also notes that reading the books is like letting one's imagination run wild. "They're just really cool," says Shafi. "You read one, you want to read them all."

 

The first novel, released in 1997, sold slowly, picking up popularity through word of mouth. By the time the fourth book, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, was released in 2000, children were lining up days in advance at bookstores in eager anticipation. In the first 48 hours, U.S. fans bought 3 million copies, according to the U.S. News & World Report. And nearly two-thirds of all American children have read one or more of the books, according to NBC news.

 

The overall theme of the Harry Potter books has been addressed before in other classical fantasy series, such as C.S. Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia, J.R.R. Tolkein's Lord of the Rings trilogy and Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising series. But Rowling's books are unique in that most of the stories take place in a magical school set amongst the "normal" world of England. And school stories are always big sellers with children, according to Scholastic Inc, which publishes the Harry Potter books.

 

But Richard Abanes, a cult researcher and author of Harry Potter and the Bible, says it is the books' setting that is the real problem. "Should … parents be exposing their children to these 'wizard-training manuals?'" Abanes asks. "Is there a sinister side to Harry Potter and his pals that is spiritually dangerous for young readers?"

 

In a forward to Abanes' book, Doug Groothuis, an associate professor of philosophy at the Denver Seminary, writes, "The Potter series is steeped in a thinly-disguised occultism; it favors morally-flawed, egocentric characters who lie with impunity, practice occultist techniques, use profanity, and refuse to repent; it frequently depicts gratuitous violence; and it develops logically muddled plots."

 

"Media hype to the contrary, this is not good news for the children, or adults, of America," he adds. "Some celebrate that children are reading the massive Potter books instead of watching television. They need to think again. To be sure, television is, more often than not, a moral, spiritual, and intellectual wasteland; but so are the Potter books."

 

Others disagree. Shazia Baig, whose daughter is a fan of the books, says trying to interpret the books ruins the enjoyment factor. "I try to read what my daughter reads, and I've enjoyed these books as well," says Baig. "They're exciting and intriguing. And my daughter and I have talked enough for her to know that these books are for fun, and no more than that."

 

Baig says as long as parents are aware of what their children read they can monitor what kids get out of the books. "If you see your child getting obsessed thinking they can learn magic like Harry Potter, then it's your duty to take them aside and explain that it's just fiction," she says. "Sometimes you read to learn, and sometimes you read for fun. Harry Potter is for fun."

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Peace,

 

So, would reading 1001 Nights be against Islam since it is all about magic and mythology? I would think that only if the book actually encouraged magic, or even made the slightest pretense about being real, then it would fall under that category. The Harry Potter books are written for fun and do not make any attempt to portray the magic as real. Noone can learn magic from reading them. They are simply childrens books (that adults can also read and enjoy).

 

Flutterby,

 

The Stranger, by Camus, was one of the few books that when I read it totally blew me away and made me start to look at things differently. Many people don't get it, but those that do come away with a different perspective on things. Great book.

 

Another book that did this to me was Enquiry concerning Human Understanding by David Hume. It is a philosophy book, not fiction, but I highly recommend it for anyone that can handle the content. It deals with how we percieve things and why, and comes to the conclusion that man can never prove or know anything absolutely.

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Asalaamo aleykum,

 

Other then Islamic books ?......no...

 

only other book I open once in a while is the telephonebook :D

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Salam

 

Livius do you have proof of that? :D

Because if you do then I would love to see it, as I got my proof from Islam Online answered by Sheikh Muhammad Al-Mukhtar Al-Shinqiti.

 

Here's another one i found on science-fiction.

 

Question :

 

 

Is it OK to read books on Science fiction where a mad scientist creates a human being or a hybrid between a human and an animal?

 

Answer :

 

Praise be to Allaah.

 

If these stories include lies, such as Darwin’s theory (evolution), and other things that are contrary to the facts stated by Islam and the facts of natural science, then the Muslim should avoid them, and keep himself busy with something that will be of use to him, such as learning good things or doing righteous deeds or reading true stories and historical accounts and so on. Many of the movies and novels that are known as “Science Fiction� include a lot of kufr, such as putting life and death in the hands of some created being, giving creatures the ability to create from nothing, saying that scientists in laboratories can create from nothing, making inanimate things come alive, creating life from a fossil that has been dead for many millenia, or travelling to the future then coming back to the present. All of this is impossible, and no one knows the unseen except for Allaah. Some of these novels and movies also include clear contradictions of historical facts that are mentioned in the Qur’aan and Sunnah, such as man’s creation and his life on earth. When the Muslim indulges in reading these books or watching these movies, it shakes his belief or at the very least wastes his time and keeps him busy with something that is of no benefit to him. Some people claim that this is just entertainment and a way of passing time, but entertainment is not permitted if it is haraam, and the Muslim’s time is too precious to be wasted on such trivial things. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “One of the signs of a person being properly committed to Islam is that he leaves alone that which does not concern him.� (Reported by al-Tirmidhi, 2239, and others. Also in Saheeh al-Jaami’, 5911). And Allaah knows best.

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:D

 

what???? those 2 books are masterpieces!!!!, inspector calls is one of the first plays to use the concept of time to create twists and turns in the story, and to kill a mockingbird accurately depicts rascism, you should read them carefully!!!!

 

:D

 

*gasp* I agree with Lateralus63 on this one. To Kill a Mockingbird is one of my all time favorites! :D

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:D

 

thank you bro! CE, how can u say that book is bad (to kill a mocking bird, i've never read inspecter calls). it wicked  :D I loved studying that book during my GCSE's in English Lit. I wished i could of done it for A/S but we had to do Enduring Love instead. Turned out to be a  :D book. Its a film now as well.

 

anyways im sure u just had a bad teacher who didnt teach you the book properly  :D

Never read Enduring Love...But I agree To Kill A Mockingbird was a very good book. :D Oh, and sis Crystal Eyes, I liked it more after I had to analyse it. :D

 

I'm gonna read Inspector Calls just to disprove Crystal Eyes on that. :D :D

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Guest amani

:D

^^ sis dont bother bad man i tell you badddddd

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:D

 

i like to read...i think its really a great way enter different situations...I love the fact that the first words that Prophet :D heard from Angel Jibrael was 'Iqra' . reading can really teach us a lot if we pay close attention.

 

:D

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Asalaamu Alaykum

 

I couldnt vote beause

 

Yes! I love reading but ONLY Islamic BOOKS!!!!!

 

*Edited* oh ooooooooops i didnt see the sub-title :D :D :D

Edited by proudmuslimah

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asalamu alaikum

 

it's been a long time since i read anything other than my textbooks. I have a list of Islamic books i gotta get through before i consider reading anything else.

 

I read To Kill a Mockingbird a loooong time a go........totally forgot what it was about.

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:D

 

Oh Yeah

i Love reading :D

i ll read everythin as long as i think its interesting B)

 

unfortunately i dun have much time to read these days...

mm maybe ill make sum time to read tonight :D

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asalamualaykum,

i voted last one cuz of the (other than Islamic ones) but i'm a bookworm - i love reading but i only read Islamic books because all the others are filled with lies and aren't worth the paper they're written on.

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:D

 

i think when reading, one should approach it with an open mind. anyway, very much yes with the reading. so much, in fact, that i wish to be a world lit professor. or like, to teach it at a highschool level.

 

edit: poo, i already posted here. oh well. :D

Edited by flutterby

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salaam ,

i love reading too......i have loads of fav novels...i.e harry potter,sweet valley,sydney sheldon,and all teh adventures of sherlock holmes...awsome..i guess i am more in to the mystry novels...!

maslama

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asalamu alaikum

 

So i voted  No, waste of time and shouldnt be done!!!

You sure about that? I hope you do realise how naive you sound here one day.

 

Me? I love to read books! Used to read a lot of novels, now it's mainly design books which I have to buy sadly and at outrageous prices too!

 

I like detective and crime stories. I think I must have a criminal type mind. The Hardy Boys books are super!

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salamu alikum,

i like to read books too,

my kinds beside Islamic one ,philosopy,old scinetist ,hirotric,biology...

and some intreseting article ..

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