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Show Me Where We're 'stealing.'

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... never-ending malicious policies of grabbing the natural resources and wealth of others countries...

 

 

This is a quote from poster 'Ahsan'. I hear this claim on this site often. Can someone show me where the U.S. has 'stolen' a countries resources ? If you're talking about oil, it seems we are paying $67 a barrel for the stuff. Oil producing nations incomes are higher now than ever. Doesn't sound like 'stealing' to me.

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PropellerAds

:D / Greetings to All

 

This is a quote from poster 'Ahsan'. I hear this claim on this site often. Can someone show me where the U.S. has 'stolen' a countries resources ? If you're talking about oil, it seems we are paying $67 a barrel for the stuff. Oil producing nations incomes are higher now than ever. Doesn't sound like 'stealing' to me.

 

I think one reference to this is in Iraq...here are a few links among many...

 

(www.)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.washingtonpost(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/05/AR2005110501151.html"]US owes $208 Million to Iraq[/url]

 

(www.)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.theinsider(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/news/article.asp?id=0876"]US steals another 9 billion of Iraq's oil money[/url]

 

(www.)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.uruknet.info/?p=8851"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_www.uruknet.info/?p=8851[/url]

 

By the way why is this in the News section?

 

Oh yeah...this must be news to you... :D

Edited by freedslave

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Salaam/ Hello friends,

 

a good book to do with the whole concept of stealing other countries wealth, minerals and resources is

'Confessions of an Economic Hit Man' by John Perkins .

 

here is a brief summary of the book:

 

In this shocking memoir, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, John Perkins tells of his own inner journey from willing servant of empire to impassioned advocate for the rights of oppressed people. Covertly recruited by the United States National Security Agency and on the payroll of an international consulting firm, he traveled the world—to Indonesia, Panama, Ecuador, Colombia, Saudi Arabia, Iran and other strategically important countries. His job was to implement policies that promoted the interests of the U.S. corporatocracy (a coalition of government, banks, and corporations) while professing to alleviate poverty—policies that alienated many nations and ultimately led to September 11 and growing anti-Americanism. Within a few weeks of its release , Confessions of an Economic Hit Man landed onThe New York Times Bestseller List, then 19 other bestseller lists including the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post. The author has been interviewed repeatedly on national radio and television shows, including Amy Goodman's Democracy Now, CSPAN's Book TV, and PBS' Now with David Brancaccio. And now the book is being published in 9 languages around the world. According to John Perkins, "It is accomplishing an important objective in inspiring people to think and talk and to know that we can change the world."

 

I read the book quite some time ago, and I highly recommend the book.

Personally, i think this 'stealing' concept is not just a problem coming from the US. Its an international corporate problem. But speaking of america, its more open there........heck, the US Gov even steals american peoples votes, and get away with it, nevermind other nations wealth and resources...

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This is a quote from poster 'Ahsan'. I hear this claim on this site often. Can someone show me where the U.S. has 'stolen' a countries resources ? If you're talking about oil, it seems we are paying $67 a barrel for the stuff. Oil producing nations incomes are higher now than ever. Doesn't sound like 'stealing' to me.

 

Instead of having oil in an enemies hand's America now has the oil in the hands of puppets. So if another unfriendly nation decided to shut down oil production, they have a little puppet to pump out the oil to them.

 

And then shutting out other nation's oil companies just means they want it for themselves.

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Being a savy business person doesn't make you a thief. What nation doesn't act in their own interest ? And the 'puppets' that pump oil to the U.S. are getting $67 a barrel. These 'puppets' are making more money off the U.S. than ever before. Doesn't sound like thievery to me.

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It is if the Iraqi people get none of the monies.

 

 

So the U.S. has spent a trillion and is 'stealing' millions ? Not a very good return on its' money.

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So the U.S. has spent a trillion and is 'stealing' millions ? Not a very good return on its' money.

 

 

This is actually the deliciously ironic part. YOU, the tax payers are on the hook for the trillions that the US government spent while the oil companies (including Bush and his cronies) are reaping the sweet sweet profits of the war you payed for. :D

Edited by Omar786

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Anywhere there is that much money involved, there are hands in it that shouldn't be. I'm sure a lot of Iraqis' have lined thier pockets with U.S. money meant for the Iraqi people. That goes for the U.S. expenditure in Iraq, as well as for the aid money the U.S. gives other countries throughout the world, among other things. Look how Arafats' widow is living 'la vida loca' in France (of course) off of all the aid money he syphoned off the Palestinian peolpe. Or all the African dictators with Swiss bank accounts stuffed with U.S. aid money they stole from their people. Greed isn't an American 'phenomenon'.

Edited by diverdown

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:D

 

errr.......

I think you missed the point of my remarks.

Corruption exists every where, but that was not the point.

The point was that Bush is paying for this war with tax payer money (ie. Your money), yet the only people benefiting from this expenditure is companies related to oil (Halibertan any one?). Lets face it, going to Iraq has not made the US any safer, it has not benefited the Iraqi people, yet Mr. Bush insists that the US stay there and spend more money on Iraq.

Hmmm......could it be that his buddies in the oil companies are encouraging him to stay, regardless of the evidence to the contrary, so that they may reap the rewards of all that Iraqi oil? :D

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I believe a big reason for the U.S. invading Iraq was to make it a 'forum' to fight radical Muslims in so we didn't have to fight them in the streets of America, not to 'steal oil'. The thinking being that the jihadis' will go to Iraq to fight 'the Great Satan' instead of coming to the U.S. to 'work their magic'. It is pretty clear they are trying to come. Sort of like a 'roach motel'. Attract them to one spot and kill them. If that was G.W.B.s' intention, I think it worked. There hasn't been anymore attacks in the U.S. since 9/11. So maybe the tax dollars didn't go for naught. And the reason we are still in Iraq is because if the U.S. left right now, the sectarian killings would get even worse. Then the world would scream on us for leaving. You don't think the suicide bombings and kidknappings would stop if the U.S. left, do you ? Nah ! Now that Sadaam is gone, everyone is jockeying for position and paybacks are being doled out. And as far as Iraqi oil is concerned, the big oil companies didn't need an invasion to get Iraqs oil. They would have gotten it anyway. They were buying it from Sadaam under the 'oil for food' program ( another corrupt program thanks to France and Russia ) before the invasion.

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This whole notion of "if we don’t fight them over there, we will fight them over here" is absolutely absurd.

For one thing, the mujahideen in Iraq are in NO way related to Terrorism. Most people that are fighting the US in Iraq are defending their country from foreign invasion. Yes I am sure there are some "terrorist" who are fighting the US in Iraq, but they are far out numbered by regular Iraqis defending their country.

 

And if the US REALLY wanted to fight terrorism, all they would have to do is stop supporting their dictator allies in the Middle East and let the people create their own democracies, free from US medaling. I guarantee you that will stop terrorism because once a real democracy takes hold, the people will see that by supporting terrorism they will have something to loose (where as right now they have nothing to loose) and they won’t tolerate terrorists in their back yards.

 

And the reason we are still in Iraq is because if the U.S. left right now, the sectarian killings would get even worse. Then the world would scream on us for leaving.

 

Since when did large civilian casualties or international pressure bother the US?

You are just making excuses. If the US cared at all about international opinion then they would have never entered Iraq in the first place.

 

And as far as oil companies are concerned,

The fact of the matter is that right now they have a vested interest in the US staying in Iraq, and as long as they have their fearless leader Mr. Bush in power they are going to keep making a lot of money off the misery of the Iraqi people and your Tax money.

Now is that because they wanted Mr. bush to invade Iraq or if they just happened to be at the right place at the right time, I leave up to you to decide.

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This whole notion of "if we don’t fight them over there, we will fight them over here" is absolutely absurd

 

'They' came here and bombed the W.T.C. in '93, long before Afghanistan and the toppling of Sadaam.

 

 

Yes I am sure there are some "terrorist" who are fighting the US in Iraq, but they are far out numbered by regular Iraqis defending their country.

 

 

And these guys get thier I.E.D.s, money and 'marching orders' from Teheran. Also, they are killing many more Iraqis', the people they are supposed to be 'defending', than the U.S. ever did.

 

 

And if the US REALLY wanted to fight terrorism, all they would have to do is stop supporting their dictator allies in the Middle East

 

 

We don't support Iran. Thier agents in Iraq are causing the most bloodshed, stoking the sectarian killings.

 

 

The fact of the matter is that right now they have a vested interest in the US staying in Iraq, and as long as they have their fearless leader Mr. Bush in power they are going to keep making a lot of money off the misery of the Iraqi people and your Tax money

 

 

 

You don't understand, the oil companies didn't need a U.S. invasion to get Iraqi oil. Sadaam was more than happy to sell it to them himself. If anything, the invasion slowed down their ability to pump and ship crude.

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This whole notion of "if we don’t fight them over there, we will fight them over here" is absolutely absurd

 

'They' came here and bombed the W.T.C. in '93, long before Afghanistan and the toppling of Sadaam.

Yes I am sure there are some "terrorist" who are fighting the US in Iraq, but they are far out numbered by regular Iraqis defending their country.

And these guys get thier I.E.D.s, money and 'marching orders' from Teheran. Also, they are killing many more Iraqis', the people they are supposed to be 'defending', than the U.S. ever did.

And if the US REALLY wanted to fight terrorism, all they would have to do is stop supporting their dictator allies in the Middle East

We don't support Iran. Thier agents in Iraq are causing the most bloodshed, stoking the sectarian killings.

The fact of the matter is that right now they have a vested interest in the US staying in Iraq, and as long as they have their fearless leader Mr. Bush in power they are going to keep making a lot of money off the misery of the Iraqi people and your Tax money

You don't understand, the oil companies didn't need a U.S. invasion to get Iraqi oil. Sadaam was more than happy to sell it to them himself. If anything, the invasion slowed down their ability to pump and ship crude.

 

 

:D

 

AHAHAHA

You really made me laugh on that one.

All you have is crack pot conspiracies about Iran.

Are you sure you don’t want to some how add aliens to your conspiracies as well? You might get a larger audience, because EVERY one knows for a fact that Aliens are on earth

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AHAHAHA

You really made me laugh on that one.

All you have is crack pot conspiracies about Iran.

Are you sure you don’t want to some how add aliens to your conspiracies as well? You might get a larger audience, because EVERY one knows for a fact that Aliens are on earth

:D

 

(www.)"http://washingtoninstitut#####/templateC05.php?CID=2263"]Link[/url]

 

 

PolicyWatch #964

Iranian State Sponsorship of Terror: Threatening U.S. Security, Global Stability, and Regional Peace

 

By Matthew Levitt

February 23, 2005

 

On February 16, 2005, Matthew Levitt, senior fellow and director of The Washington Institute's Terrorism Studies Program, testified in a joint hearing before the Subcommittee on the Middle East and Central Asia and the Subcommittee on International Terrorism and Nonproliferation, House Committee on International Relations. The following is a summary of his remarks. Read the full transcript of Mr. Levitt's testimony.

U.S. intelligence chiefs appearing before Congress in their annual statements on the state of the threat reiterated, as they have for many years, that Iran is the foremost state sponsor of terror. Indeed, the threat posed by Iranian-sponsored terror is multifaceted. Iranian-sponsored terror represents the single greatest threat to israeli-Arab peace. Additionally, not only does Iran support the terrorist activity of groups such as Hizballah and Hamas, but Iranian intelligence operatives themselves are directly involved in terrorist activity. Elements of al-Qaeda and the global jihadist movement are tied to Iran, while both Iranian intelligence agents and surrogates are actively undermining U.S. interests in stabilizing Iraq.

 

Targeting israel and the Peace Process

 

Hizballah, Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and the al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, all at Iran's behest, are currently attempting to torpedo the nascent peace process. In late January, Hassan Nasrallah and Khaled Mishal, the leaders of Hizballah and Hamas respectively, met in Beirut, where they declared that resistance against israel was the only option until all of Palestine was liberated. A Palestinian security official confirmed this: “Hizballah and Iran are not happy with Mahmoud Abbas's efforts to achieve a ceasefire with israel and resume negotiations with israel. That is why we do not rule out the possibility that they might try to kill him if he continues with his policy.â€

 

Palestinian officials are well aware of Hizballah's recent efforts to recruit suicide bombers to carry out attacks that would sabotage the peace process. “We know that Hizballah has been trying to recruit suicide bombers in the name of al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades to carry out attacks which would sabotage the truce,†said one Palestinian official. Another Palestinian official cited intercepted email communications and bank transactions indicating Hizballah recently increased its payments to terrorists. “Now they are willing to pay $100,000 for a whole operation whereas in the past they paid $20,000, then raised it to $50,000.â€

 

Iranian Intelligence Agents

 

Iranian agents have long been directly involved in acts of terrorism themselves and in concert with Hizballah networks, beyond the terrorist activities carried out independently by its proxy groups. Iranian operatives are well known for conducting surveillance for potential attacks against U.S. interests, both on American soil and abroad.

 

Last June, two security guards working at Iran's mission to the United Nations were kicked out of the country for conducting surveillance of New York City landmarks in a manner incompatible with their stated duties. A U.S. counterintelligence official said at the time, “We cannot think of any reason for this activity other than this was reconnaissance for some kind of potential targeting for terrorists.†In the late 1990s, former FBI director Louis Freeh wrote, the FBI wanted to photograph and fingerprint official Iranian delegations visiting the United States because the “MOIS [iranian Intelligence Ministry] was using these groups to infiltrate its agents into the country.†In 1998 Iranian agents were spotted conducting surveillance of U.S. interests in Kazakhstan. In 1997, a Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) report detailed the casing of U.S. diplomats in Tajikistan by Iranian intelligence operatives. These examples highlight the Iranian modus operandi for conducting surveillance of U.S. interests.

 

Furthermore, several of the Hizballah operatives involved in the 1996 Khobar Towers attack received terrorist training in Iran. The Iranian embassy in Damascus also served as an important source of logistics and support for Saudi Hizballah members traveling to and from Lebanon. Former FBI director Freeh has said that FBI agents interviewed six of those who carried out the attack, and all of them directly implicated the IRGC [iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps], MOIS, and senior Iranian government officials in the planning and execution of the attack.

 

Iranian/al-Qaeda Ties

 

According to CIA director Porter Goss, Tehran harbors “important members of al-Qaeda, causing further unclarity about Iran's commitment to bring them to justice.†As the 9-11 Commission Report documented, several al-Qaeda operatives were allowed to travel through Iran with great ease in the period leading up to September 11. The report noted a “persistence of contacts between Iranian security officials and senior al-Qaeda figures†and drew attention to an informal agreement by which Iran would support al-Qaeda training with the understanding that such training would be used “for actions carried out primarily against israel and the United States.†Indeed, al-Qaeda operatives were trained in explosives, security, and intelligence on at least two occasions, with one group trained in Iran around 1992 and a second trained by Hizballah in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in the fall of 1993.

 

Iran is apparently a common and convenient meeting place for radical Sunnis affiliated with global jihadist groups and other terrorist organizations, including Hamas and Hizballah. In Pakistan, the leader of a jihadist organization there openly admitted to having person-to-person contacts with other groups, adding, “Sometimes fighters from Hamas and Hizballah help us.†Asked where contacts with groups such as Hamas and Hizballah are made, the Pakistani replied that a good place to meet was in Iran. In September 2001 Abu Musab al-Zarqawi met an associate named Muhammad Abu Dhess in Iran “and instructed him to commit terrorist attacks against Jewish or israeli facilities in Germany with 'his [Zarqawi's] people.'â€

 

Iranian and Hizballah Activities in Iraq

 

While Iranian ministers assert that Tehran has not encouraged the Iraqi insurgency nor permitted suicide bombers to cross the border from Iran to Iraq, certain actions indicate otherwise. As recently as December 2004, a group calling themselves “The Committee of the Commemoration of Martyrs of the Global Islamic Campaign,†which is affiliated with the IRGC, had registered more than 25,000 volunteers seeking martyrdom to participate in the insurgency facing U.S.-led forces in Iraq. The group used the commemoration of a monument to the 1983 Hizballah attack that killed 241 U.S. servicemen as a recruiting drive for suicide bombers.

 

One Iraqi official declared that “[t]he country that penetrates the borders the most and encroaches the most on Iraq is Iran†and that Iran remains “the first enemy of Iraq.†He charged in an interview that Iran has established military positions on the Iraqi-Iranian border, sent spies and saboteurs into the country, and even infiltrated the new government. Most recently, on February 9, 2005, Iraq's interior minister Falah al-Naquib announced that eighteen members of Hizballah were detained in Iraq on charges of terrorism.

 

Conclusion

 

Iran is indeed the world's foremost state sponsor of terrorism. The sheer scope of Iranian terrorist activity is remarkable, including both the terrorism carried out by Iranian-supported terrorist groups and by Iranian agents themselves. Iranian sponsored terrorism threatens key United States security interests and American citizens alike.

 

It is critical that the international effort to rein in Iran's nuclear weapons program include an equally concerted effort to forestall its state sponsorship of terrorism. Failure to do so guarantees that Iran and its proxies will continue to undermine israeli-Arab peace negotiations, conduct surveillance of U.S., israeli, and other targets for possible terrorist attack, and destabilize Iraq.

 

This summary was prepared by Julie Sawyer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just one of many accounts of Iranian agents causing death in Iraq. Just like in Lebanon. Ahamadinejad doesn't look like an alien to me, although he does bare a striking resemblance to Ringo Starr.

Edited by diverdown

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...or try this...

 

 

 

(www.)"http://rferl/featuresarticle/2006/03/ea014483-48dc-495f-9bad-ebfa1f3b392d.html"]Link[/url]

 

 

Iraq/Iran: Has Tehran Crossed The Line?

By Kathleen Ridolfo

 

Iraq observers have spent much of the past three years debating the extent of Iranian influence in Iraqi affairs. There is a growing belief in both Iraqi and U.S. circles that Iranian agents have permeated the Iraqi security apparatus, as well as the extra-governmental militias that engage in armed conflict with Iraqi police and army units and multinational forces. Iranian-style weapons -- in particular, more powerful improvised explosive devices -- have also made their way to Iraq in increasing numbers, posing a considerable threat to Iraqi and U.S. security forces.

 

 

Last week, U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld repeated allegations that the Iranian government is "putting people into Iraq to do things that are harmful to the future of Iraq."

 

Speaking to reporters at a March 7 press briefing in Washington, Rumsfeld added that "they're putting Iranian Al-Quds Force-type people into" Iraq. Asked if these forces were carrying out violence or trying to instigate political instability, Rumsfeld replied: "I don't think we could consider them religious pilgrims."

 

General Peter Pace, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told reporters at the same briefing that the U.S. has found some improvised explosive devices and weapons that it believes can be traced to Iran. Pace added that there has been an influx of "individuals" across the Iran-Iraq border but declined to say how many. Asked if the people entering Iraq were backed by the Iranian government, Pace said simply "I don't know."

 

Asked the same question, Rumsfeld was more ominous. "Well, of course," Rumsfeld said. "The Revolutionary Guard doesn't go milling around willy-nilly, one would think."

 

He added that the Iranian government might some day view its role in Iraq as an "error in judgment."

 

Years Of Speculation

 

Iraq observers have spent much of the past three years debating the extent of Iranian influence in Iraqi affairs. There is a growing belief in both Iraqi and U.S. circles that Iranian agents have permeated the Iraqi security apparatus, as well as the extra-governmental militias that engage in armed conflict with Iraqi police and army units and multinational forces. Iranian-style weapons -- in particular, more powerful improvised explosive devices -- have also made their way to Iraq in increasing numbers, posing a considerable threat to Iraqi and U.S. security forces.

 

In an August 2005 feature, the newsweekly "Time" argued that the Iranian regime began planning its infiltration to Iraq in late 2002, setting up military units along the Iran-Iraq border. The units reportedly accompanied Iraqi opposition parties and militias when they entered Iraq during the opening days of the war. "Time" reported that as many as 12,000 people entered Iraq from Iran in the early days after the U.S-led invasion, including agents of the Iranian security services.

 

Three years later, Iran appears to have entrenched its intelligence and paramilitary forces in Iraq by playing two sides of the conflict: Shi'ite parties and militias who share a common religious outlook, and Sunni Arab Islamists bent on establishing an Islamic caliphate in Iraq.

 

Among the possible Iranian goals in Iraq that have been bandied about are (1) establishing an Islamic state and preventing the formation of a pro-Arab, pro-U.S., secularist regime; (2) driving U.S. forces from Iraq; (3) preventing the revival of Al-Najaf over Qom as the seat of Shi'ite scholarship; and (4) obtaining influence over the exploitation of Iraq's natural resources, namely oil. A fifth possible goal is to establish a secure route linking Iran to Syria, thereby enabling the movement of goods and hardware that could be used as leverage in Iran's relationship with israel.

 

Moving In

 

Iraq's leading Shi'ite political party, the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI), was based in Iran for some 20 years prior to the downfall of the Saddam Hussein regime. SCIRI's armed wing, the Badr Corps (now known as the Badr Organization) was trained by Iran's Al-Quds Force, a special-operations unit of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps. The Cairo-based weekly "Al-Ahram" contended in 2005 that Iranian President Mahmud Ahmadinejad played a role in the formation of the Badr Corps and hence wields influence over the organization today. However, the veracity of that allegation is not known.

 

As the U.S.-led invasion in 2003 got under way, Badr forces -- hundreds of whom are Iraqis with military training who defected to Iran in the 1980s -- entered Iraq. They quickly took control of security, local governance, and aid organizations in Shi'ite-populated towns in Mada'in, located some 30 kilometers south of Baghdad, and as far north as Samarra, located 100 kilometers north of Baghdad. Many analysts believe the Badr forces were accompanied by Iranian Al-Quds Force troops.

 

Within a month, their sphere of influence had spread to other areas of the country. SCIRI head Abd al-Aziz al-Hakim announced on April 23, 2003, that Badr forces "are in most villages and areas" in the country. "Nobody can drive them out," he said. The lack of security along the 1,000-kilometer Iran-Iraq border allowed for the free flow of weapons into Iraq.

 

In areas where these forces could not seize overt control, they turned to local clerics to bolster their influence. In areas where they faced resistance, they bought influence in local councils or seized power by force. Meanwhile, Iranian intelligence agents employed a systematic program to eliminate anyone with close ties to the United States, as well as former military personnel and technocrats who served under Hussein, Cairo's "Al-Ahram Weekly" reported on July 6, 2005.

 

The Situation Today

 

Iran's influence in Iraq today reportedly extends to all corners of the country but is most pervasive in the south. Iranian-backed militia consolidated their control over Al-Basrah by 2004. Now, they dominate the police, governorate council, security apparatuses, and even humanitarian organizations. The militias in the city have virtually eliminated local opposition. Now, minority Christians, Sunni Arabs, and secular Shi'ites are subjected to strict Islamic conduct in the region. Journalists have either abandoned their work altogether or work clandestinely.

 

In central Iraq, Iran has reportedly funded insurgents through Syria, setting up intelligence networks that some have claimed were better organized than Iraqi intelligence. In its August 2005 report, "Time" magazine wrote that it had obtained IRGC files from August 2004 showing at least 11,740 Badr Corps members were still on the IRGC payroll.

 

In October 2005, London's "Sunday Telegraph" reported that the Al-Quds Force had established three main smuggling routes into Iraq through Al-Basrah, Al-Amarah, and Baghdad from a base in Ahvaz, which is located inside the Iranian border southeast of Al-Amarah.

 

Support For Al-Sadrists

 

Shi'ite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr denies any relationship with the Iranian regime, but he visited Iran in June 2003, where he met with high-level Iranian officials. Al-Sadr visited Iran again in January 2006, meeting with Supreme National Security Council Secretary Ali Larijani. Since that time, it appears relations have deepened, and some U.S. and Iraqi officials have alleged that Iran is funding al-Sadr's Imam Al-Mahdi Army.

 

An Al-Sadr fighter in Al-Najaf in August 2004 (AFP)Following the fall of the Hussein regime, al-Sadr, a low-level cleric, aligned himself with Qom-based Iraqi Ayatollah Kazim al-Ha'iri, relying on the ayatollah to issue fatwas that supported his agenda. The relationship was soon on rocky ground after al-Sadr clashed with the clerical establishment in Al-Najaf in late 2003. Later clashes between al-Sadr loyalists and U.S.-led coalition forces in 2004 led to a severing of ties with al-Ha'iri -- leaving al-Sadr without the crucial backing of a senior cleric.

 

During this period Iran reportedly set up training camps for Al-Mahdi militia inside Iranian territory, according to several sources. According to the reports, the militiamen are trained in combat tactics, reconnaissance, and espionage.

 

It was also during this time that a number of attempted assassinations were carried out against leading Shi'ite clergy. Some Iraqis accused the Iranian Al-Quds Force of carrying out the attacks, saying Iran's clerical leadership was worried about the revival of Al-Najaf's hawzahs (seminaries), which they viewed as a threat to Shi'ite seminaries in Qom.

 

The Al-Zarqawi Link

 

Iran has had links to key Al-Qaeda leaders since the mid-1990s. Al-Qaeda No. 2 leader Ayman al-Zawahri was the "frequent guest" of the Iranian intelligence ministry and Al-Quds Force commander Ahmad Vahidi throughout the 1990s, according to a January 20, 2003, report by the International Policy Institute for Counterterrorism. Iran's relations with Abu Mus'ab al-Zarqawi's Al-Qaeda-affiliated organization reportedly began in 2001. According to a December 2005 report prepared by Dore Gold and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Haleve for the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, al-Zarqawi visited Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) training camps and received logistical support from the Al-Quds Force in 2001. Likewise, al-Zarqawi spent time in Syrian training camps in 2002.

 

While an ideological divide separates al-Zarqawi's Salafist ideology and the Shi'ite ideology of Iran, the two share some common goals, including the overthrow of corrupt Sunni Arab regimes, the desire to establish Islamist rule across the Muslim world, and the destruction of israel and its allies, namely the United States. Therefore, it is entirely plausible that al-Zarqawi and Iran's theocratic leaders have been able to come to some sort of strategic alliance.

 

Iran has reportedly aided Sunni Islamist terrorist organizations in the past -- in Algeria, Egypt, and Gaza. Western intelligence analysts claim that Iran's modus operandi is to "outsource" to proxy organizations the conduct of terrorist activities so that they cannot be linked to Iran.

 

Iranian Brigadier General Qasim Suleimani of the Revolution Guard Corps said in 2004 that Iran supported al-Zarqawi because his activities in Iraq coincided with Iran's goal of preventing the establishment of a pro-U.S. government there, the London-based "Al-Sharq al-Awsat" reported in August 2004.

 

Any al-Zarqawi-Iran connection may have been severed in recent months, however, as al-Zarqawi's ideology hardened. Al-Zarqawi announced in July that his group had formed the so-called Umar Brigade to hunt down and kill Shi'ite Badr Corps members. Despite warnings from Al-Qaeda leaders -- including No. 2 Ayman al-Zawahri -- that he should cease his attacks on Shi'ites, al-Zarqawi's group has continued its activities. Around the same time, al-Zarqawi also clashed with his one-time spiritual mentor, Jordanian-based Abu Ahmad al-Maqdisi over theological issues.

 

Iran's Ties To The Iraqi Government

 

Iran's strong relations with members of Iraq's Shi'ite-dominated government go back to the 1980s when groups like SCIRI and the Islamic Al-Da'wah (Call) party sought refuge in Iran from Saddam Hussein's regime.

 

Iraqi Interior Minister Bayan Jabr (RFE/RL) Within this culture SCIRI's armed wing was born, and today members of those groups are prominent in the Iraqi government, including Prime Minister and Al-Da'wah Party leader Ibrahim al-Ja'fari and Interior Minister Bayan Jabr, who is a former leader of the Badr Corps. Jabr's leadership of the Interior Ministry has been called into question after dozens of attacks on Sunni Arabs in Iraq in the past year were purportedly carried out by armed men wearing ministry uniforms. Jabr has denied any wrongdoing by his forces, saying the uniforms were worn by insurgents hoping to spark sectarian violence in Iraq.

 

Other Iraqi Shi'ite leaders have also blamed insurgents for attacks on Sunni Arabs. Some observers have speculated that leaders such as SCIRI head al-Hakim and al-Ja'fari have lost influence over their original base of support among Iraqis living in Iran before the war. As a result, either they can't control armed Shi'a or they won't, because they are still dependent on Iranian financial support for their extra-governmental activities.

 

The outgoing transitional government has worked hard to secure stronger relations with Iran, signing a number of economic agreements with Iraq's eastern neighbor over the past nine months. Al-Ja'fari has in the past supported recognizing Iranians as a minority group in Iraq, "Time" magazine reported in August 2005. Although Iraqi Shi'ite leaders have maintained that they do not support the establishment of an Iranian-style theocracy in Iraq, they did lobby intensively for the new constitution to spell out a greater role for Islam.

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:D

 

Actually yes I am buddy.

 

I still don’t see any evidence of all the freedom fighters in Iraq getting "marching orders" from Tehran.

I am sure Iran has some dealing with some of the freedom fighters in Iraq.

But to suggest that Iran is some how controlling all of them is absurd, it is just wishful thinking of a warmonger.

If Iran did control the freedom fighters then they would be giving the US a perfect excuse to attack them.

Iran is much safer if It does not get too deeply involved with Iraq.

At least until the US can fabricate evidence against it, so that it has an excuse to invade Iran.

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(www.)"http://newsmax/archives/articles/2005/6/1/211629.shtml"]Link[/url]

 

Iran Plotting to Seize Iraq

Charles R. Smith

Thursday, June 2, 2005

 

Tehran Sends Agents, Money and Bombs to Baghdad

 

According to several top U.S. officials, Iranian intelligence agents are actively trying to take over Iraq. The Iranian operation to destabilize Iraq has been going full steam since the collapse of Saddam's regime in April 2003.

Story Continues Below

 

 

U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld recently stated that operatives belonging to the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps are currently infiltrating Iraq.

There are mountains of evidence to support Rumsfeld's claims. In September 2003, Iraqi security forces arrested a dozen Iranian agents in Baghdad, allegedly as they were planning bomb attacks.

 

According to the U.S. Defense Department, in August 2004, 30 Iranians were captured fighting for anti-U.S. cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr. In addition, U.S. and Iraqi forces guarding the Iranian border seized two truckloads of weapons reportedly destined for Sadr's Mahdi militia.

 

Iranian Activities in Iraq

 

"We are drowning in information about Iranian activities in Iraq," stated Michael Ledeen of the American Enterprise Institute. Ledeen, a resident scholar and author, is also a leading Middle East policy analyst at the public policy institute.

 

"After the battles of Fallujah and Hilla, we found names of Iranian contacts, locations of safe houses, telephone numbers, and photographs that document Iranian activities. That information led directly to the current campaigns against the terrorists," noted Ledeen.

 

According to a recent article published in Jane's Defence Weekly, Iraq's General Security Directorate (GSD) chief Mohammed Abdullah Al-Shahwani accused Iran's embassy in Baghdad of masterminding an assassination campaign in which 18 of his agents were killed.

 

Al-Shahwani claimed that raids on three Iranian safe houses in Baghdad uncovered a large cache of documents that linked Tehran to the campaign and to recruiting operatives from within the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq. Al-Shahwani claimed that the documents showed that Iran had funneled $45 million to terrorists inside Iraq as part of an overall destabilization plan.

 

Treachery Backed by Friends

 

"Welcome to the treachery championships of Iranian, Iraqi and Syrian – with Chinese, French and Russian interests lurking beneath – 'politics' which America has now frontally engaged," stated Scott Newark, a Canadian security analyst.

 

"The Iranian Shia regime is concerned about an Iraqi Shia regime that might not be under its control although they're glad to see the Iraqi Baathists gone except that they helped fight and fund the enemies of the Great Satan," said Newark.

 

"Meanwhile in Damascus, Assad the Lesser is hearing American footsteps but is equally antsy about Islamic forces that think Allah rather the Assad family should be in charge," noted Newark.

 

"If anything might produce results that actually benefit the folks living in these countries as opposed to those ruling them – a remarkable concept called democracy – it's the American and hopefully Allied presence that provides it. Don't expect Newsweek or the N.Y. Times or Al-Jazeera to report it, but it's that 'light on the hill' specter of hope that has always been America's best feature that may just win the day in the end," said Newark.

 

"I suspect that most Iranians and Syrians hope that America hangs in there long enough for them to wrest control of their countries like Iraqis have done to have a future free from the need for U.S. troops and the dictators that enslave them," concluded Newark.

 

All Rights Reserved © 2006 NewsMax

 

 

 

I don't think Iran is controlling EVERY terrorist in Iraq, I'm sure there are some 'free agents'. But they are definately the biggest player. The Madhi militia is the biggest group in Iraq, and they are a proven Iranian puppet organisation.

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