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Us 'threatened To Bomb' Pakistan

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The United States threatened to bomb Pakistan "back to the stone age" unless it joined the fight against al-Qaeda, President Pervez Musharraf says.

General Musharraf said the warning was delivered by former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage to Pakistan's intelligence director.

 

"I think it was a very rude remark," Mr Musharraf told CBS television.

 

Pakistan agreed to side with the US, but Gen Musharraf said it did so based on his country's national interest.

 

"One has to think and take actions in the interest of the nation, and that's what I did," he said.

 

'Ludicrous' requests

 

The extracts from the CBS show 60 Minutes, which will run on Sunday, were released on the same day that the White House praised Pakistan for its co-operation in America's "war on terror".

 

Gen Musharraf is due to meet US President George W Bush at the White House on Friday.

 

 

The US allegedly ordered Pakistan to crush dissent

 

The Pakistani president said that, following the attacks of 11 September 2001, the US made some "ludicrous" demands of Pakistan.

 

"The intelligence director told me that Mr Armitage said, 'Be prepared to be bombed. Be prepared to go back to the Stone Age'," he said.

 

The US envoy also insisted that Pakistan suppress domestic expression of support for attacks on the United States, he said.

 

"If somebody's expressing views, we cannot curb the expression of views," Gen Musharraf said.

 

Mr Armitage also allegedly demanded that Pakistan allow the US to use its border posts as staging points for the war on Afghanistan.

 

Pakistan's support was considered crucial in the defeat of Afghanistan's Taleban government, which Pakistan had helped to bring to power.

 

President Musharraf has proved a loyal ally though many now will question the means used to extract the co-operation, says the BBC's US state department correspondent Jonathan Beale.

 

(www.)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/5369198.stm"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/5369198.stm[/url]

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PropellerAds

:D

Now if the situation was reversed, our non-Muslim guests would be demanding that all Muslims apologies for this.

So I will take this opportunity to Demand that all Americans condemn the actions of their government and apologies for bulling their own allies, other wise they will be supporting this fascist act by Mr. Bush.

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:D

 

 

This is why pakistan is investing heavily in its Nuclear missile dilivery systems and weapons [Pakistan is even trying to make a nuke sub...]... You should have a serious deterent if you are a muslim country, otherwise times aren't good these days...

 

w/salaam

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:D

Now if the situation was reversed, our non-Muslim guests would be demanding that all Muslims apologies for this.

So I will take this opportunity to Demand that all Americans condemn the actions of their government and apologies for bulling their own allies, other wise they will be supporting this fascist act by Mr. Bush.

 

 

He said that?!

 

:D

 

Thats actually kind of funny. Okay, on behalf of all americans, I apologize for the actions of this man who has been disgraced 100 times over by now. I wouldn't take his statements seriously, though, as he is a corrupt imbicle. He may have caught it from Jack Abramoff.

 

The statement was rude and disrespectful. Its unfortunate that a govenment official would behave so disgracefully to another country. I wouldn't worry, however, as the Abramoff scandal has knocked a lot of these idiots out of power. Also, judging by the reaction of the Pakistani President, I don't think he took the threat seriously either.

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(www.)"http://hosted.ap/dynamic/stories/B/BUSH?SITE=MNWIN&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT"]Link[/url]

 

Sep 22, 7:27 PM EDT

 

Bush 'Taken Aback' by Musharraf Comment

 

By DEB RIECHMANN

Associated Press Writer

 

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Bush said Friday that if a U.S. official tried to strong-arm Pakistan into fighting the war on terror after the Sept. 11 attacks, he didn't know about it.

 

Standing beside Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, Bush brushed off any idea of disagreement, praising Musharraf for pursuing terrorists, including Osama bin Laden.

 

"We're on the hunt together," Bush said after an Oval Office meeting with the general who is leader of the world's second-largest Islamic nation.

 

Musharraf has contended that after the Sept. 11 attacks, then-Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage told Pakistan's intelligence director that the United States would bomb the country if it didn't become a partner in the war against terrorism.

 

 

"The intelligence director told me that (Armitage) said, "Be prepared to go back to the Stone Age,'" Musharraf told CBS' "60 Minutes" in a report to air on Sunday.

 

The president said he first learned of the purported conversation from news reports. "I just don't know about it," he said. "I guess I was taken aback by the harshness of the words."

 

Musharraf declined to comment further, citing a book deal.

 

"Buy the book," Bush quipped.

 

 

Armitage said he never threatened a military strike but did tell Pakistan firmly that "you are either for us or against us."

 

Armitage, who met with Musharraf on Thursday, told Associated Press Radio concerning the bombing quote: "I was not authorized to say something like that. I did not say it."

 

In Pakistan, Ameer ul-Azeem, a spokesman for the hard-line opposition Islamic coalition Mutahida Majlis-e-Amal, said Musharraf's contention would anger Pakistani people who have long believed that they were forced "at gunpoint" into supporting the war on terror.

 

Bush's meeting with Musharraf, following the president's U.N. speech on Tuesday, gave the White House a new chance to persuade voters that Republicans have better credentials than Democrats on national security. However, with the November congressional elections approaching, it also offered a reminder that bin Laden is still on the loose five years after the Sept. 11 attacks.

 

In a recent interview, Bush said he would order military action inside Pakistan if intelligence indicated that bin Laden or other top terror leaders were hiding there. Some Pakistani officials took issue with that, saying that Pakistan was a sovereign country.

 

"All I can tell you is, is that when Osama bin Laden is found, he will be brought to justice," Bush said.

 

Musharraf shrugged off the issue as an exercise in semantics.

 

"We will deal with it. We are on the hunt together," Musharraf said.

 

The Pakistani president later told students at The George Washington University that Pakistan "joined the war not so much for the world but for ourselves."

 

He described his government as moderate and progressive and said, "I am the greatest believer in democracy." Musharraf seized power in a 1999 coup.

 

Responding to a student's question, Musharraf acknowledged that "we are moving slowly" in reforming the Islamic madrassas, or extremist schools, in his country. But he said they accounted for only 5 percent of the country's schools.

 

The United States has urged Pakistan to do more to stop militants from crossing from its tribal regions into Afghanistan. Violence fanned by Taliban extremists has reached the deadliest level since the U.S.-led invasion that toppled the hard-line government in Afghanistan in 2001.

 

Pakistan, which has deployed 80,000 troops along the border, signed a truce this month with tribal figures in an area where bin Laden is believed to be hiding. Musharraf said the truce calls for no al-Qaida or Taliban activity.

 

Some Afghan officials have labeled the truce as a deal with the Taliban, but Musharraf strongly rejected that.

 

"This deal is not at all with the Taliban," he said. "As I said, this is against the Taliban, actually."

 

Bush said Musharraf briefed him on the details of the truce.

 

"When the president looks me in the eye and says, the tribal deal is intended to reject the Talibanization of the people, and that there won't be a Taliban and won't be al-Qaida, I believe him, you know?" Bush said.

 

Bush is playing the role of middle man between Pakistan and Afghanistan - two U.S. allies in the war on terror who accuse each other of not doing enough to crack down on extremism. Bush will follow his meeting with Musharraf with one next Tuesday with Afghan President Hamid Karzai. Then the three will have a sit-down and working dinner at the White House on Wednesday.

 

Human rights activists are asking Bush to press Musharraf to restore civilian rule in Pakistan, end discrimination against women and stop using torture and arbitrary detention in counterterrorism operations.

 

Instead of giving up his military uniform in 2004 as promised, Musharraf changed the constitution so he could hold both his army post and the presidency until 2007.

 

Bush said that during their meeting, Musharraf renewed his commitment to holding elections in Pakistan next year.

 

 

 

Associated Press Diplomatic Writer Barry Schweid contributed to this report.

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:D

 

ALL that has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that the US threatened Pakistan.

you are just being an apologist for the US government here.

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...'Musharraf declined to comment further, citing a book deal...'

 

 

Funny how, after five years, he comes out with this now, right before the release of his book. Sounds like an attempt at book-selling hype.

Edited by diverdown

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...'Musharraf declined to comment further, citing a book deal...'

Funny how, after five years, he comes out with this now, right before the release of his book. Sounds like an attempt at book-selling hype.

 

 

:D

So?

If Mr. Musharaf wants to sell his book he has every right to, there is nothing illegal or immoral about that.

What is illegal and immoral is threatening to bomb a sovereign nation "back to the stone age" for no reason other then to bully them into doing your bidding.

I am sill waiting for your apology but some how I don’t think I will ever get it, with you holding hypercritical views and all. :D

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:D

I am sill waiting for your apology but some how I don’t think I will ever get it, with you holding hypercritical views and all. :D

 

Hey, Omar.

 

Why didn't you read my post. I apologized!

 

It is a safe rule to see if anyone adressed your demands before saying something provacative. Or maybe when people see my posts they just skip them :D

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Hey, Omar.

 

Why didn't you read my post. I apologized!

 

It is a safe rule to see if anyone adressed your demands before saying something provacative. Or maybe when people see my posts they just skip them :D

 

:D

My post was more so directed at diverdown.

But you are right, I should of acknowledged your apology.

So apologies for not acknowledging your apology :D

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:D

My post was more so directed at diverdown.

But you are right, I should of acknowledged your apology.

So apologies for not acknowledging your apology :D

 

 

 

What do I have to apologize for ? And there is something immoral about making up B.S. stories to sell books. I think that's what Musharref did.

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What do I have to apologize for ? And there is something immoral about making up B.S. stories to sell books. I think that's what Musharref did.

 

Just clarifying:

 

So your saying that this story is completely made up by Musharraf just to sell his book?

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