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The Issue of Music in Islam

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Anyone should view this as well, a very interesting thing to see:

 

s ubmission/music.html

 

(its submission, not s ubmimission)

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As-salaamu 'alaikum

 

Dear 'Adbul-Rahmaan

 

I do not believe you can post links until you have made a certain number of posts, however, all of the doubts presented in the article you are trying to link to have been answered and refuted in this thread, so please have the courtesy to read this thread in full and the book I have linked to in an earlier post.

 

Was-salaamu 'alaikum

 

Aboo Uthmaan

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Anyone should view this as well, a very interesting thing to see:

 

s ubmissionbsm.gif

 

ÇáÃãà ááå æÇáÕáÇÉ æÇáÕáÇÉ æÇáÓáÇã Úáì ÑÓæá Çááå

æÈÚÃ

ÇáÓÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜ Úáíßã æÑÃãå Çááå æÈÑßÇÊå ÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜÜáÇã

 

If you are referring to the web site called submission it is better you don’t link anything they have to say here or any of their articles. These people are against the Whole ahadeeth all together they only take the Quran, I have had many debates with them they totally reject the Sunnah that in it self is not part from Islam and whomever reject sunnah is indeed not a Muslim..

Barak Allahuma feekom !

 

 

As for Zoyeb It is not about what you think we are talking about Halaal and Haram here lets not follow our hawa and make Qiyas on what is permissible and what is not!

 

Jazakum Allahu kheyrn jaza!

 

fe Aman Ellah

Al Faqera el Allah[/center]

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I see. Will read then. Peace

 

Assalamualaikum.

 

(But how do I avoid music if I hear music everywhere I go?)

 

:D

Remembering Allah :D like making zikr, tasbeeh helps insha*Allah from my own experience but if it too loud put your fingers in your ears! :D

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As-salaamu #alaikum

 

Dear 'Abdul-Rahman

 

Firstly, the question should be: can anyoen give me evidence that music is haram in thr Qur'aan and/or Sunnah, we as Muslims have 2 sources from which rulings are extract. If you specifically want something from the Qur'aan then read the book that I linked to in an earlier post, all the evidence you will need is there, including evidence from the Qur'aan.

 

Was-salaamu 'alaikum

 

Aboo Uthmaan

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Salamu alaykum

 

Abu Uthamaan akhee

 

is there a difference between merely singing without any musical instruments. the mere fact of just beautifying words with your voice. is this also unlawful, sorry i didnt read the whole thread, kinda long.

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As-salaamu 'alaikum

 

Dear brother

 

There is a whole section at the end of the article concerning certain exceptions, it would be better to skip to that bit to have your question answered inshaa'Allaah, and that is because the author could do the issue more justice than I ever could.

 

Was-salaamu 'alaikum

 

Aboo Uthmaan

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Al salamu alaykum

 

brothers and sisters you cannot simply state that music is haram or halal, its common sense, there is music in the world which leads muslims away from Allah however their is also music which can help you worship eg anasheed etc surley u cannot say anything which is glorifying Allah is haram? basically i think it is just common sence surley brothers and sisters you can tell for yourselves what music is right and wrong and you dont need endless sheets of ahadeeth to tell you what to listen to if you are unsure than just stay away.

 

wa alykum alsalam

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As-salaamu 'alaikum

 

Imaam Maalik said woe to the one who does not have an Imaam to have already said what we say, not only do we have an Imaam, we have the Qur'aan, the Sunnah, endless statements from the Sahaabah and the Taabi’een and the opinions of the 4 Imaams and many other than them, and this is sufficient for us.

 

With Allaah is the facilitation to do what is right!

 

Was-salaamu 'alaikum

 

Aboo Uthmaan

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So what type of music are Muslims forbidden from listening to? Any particular genre,particular bands?

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Thank you shining star for your input. I have also studied the issue of music in Islam and have reached the conclusion that music is permissible in Islam as long as its intention is pure. Music has also been an inalienable part of Muslim culture of Persia and India in the past.

 

Wasalaam

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Music has also been an inalienable part of Muslim culture of Persia and India in the past.

 

Wasalaam

 

Salaam,

 

It was/is a common part of the culture among many african tribes, including those that are muslim.

 

Imperial1

Edited by Imperial1

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Fatwa on Music, Muscians and Shari’ah by Mahmud Shaltut, the late Shaykh of

Al-Azhar

 

[shaykh Mahmud Shaltut (1960) was the rector of Al-Azhar University,

probably the most prestigious academic religious institution in the

contemporary Muslim world and a jurist by profession]

 

The fatwa was written in response to a letter of enquiry about the very

subject of this paper. The fatwa appeared in a collection of legal rulings

by Shaltut on various religious, economic, political and social questions.

 

After lamenting on the lack of consensus on this issue through centuries,

the author repeats the oft-stated conditional approval of music, basing his

approval on the following four arguments.

 

First, he maintains that listening to or performing music, like tasting

delicious foods, feeling soft cloths, smelling pleasant odours, seeing

beautiful sights, or achieving knowledge of the unknown, are all instinctive

pleasures with which God has endowed man. They all have the effect of

calming when one is disturbed, of relaxing when one is tired, of refreshment

in mental or physical exhaustion and of rekindling the participant with

energy. God, Shaykh Shaltut argues, has created these instincts in human

beings for a good purpose, and therefore it may even be impossible for them

to perform their duties in this life without the aid of such instincts and

pleasures which help them reach their goals. He concludes that it is

therefore impossible that the Shari’ah be against these instincts and

pleasures. Instead the law has for purpose the disciplining of the instincts

for pleasure and the channelling of their use so that they can work

constructively together to achieve higher moral ends.

 

His Second argument is that the Shari’ah, as well as the Qur’an on which it

is based, seeks the Golden Mean, thus preventing from exaggeration either on

the side of no-use, or over-use of music.

 

Thirdly, he turns to the arguments of his predecessors, the jurists who have

given opinions on sama’ or “listeningâ€. He summarises that they permitted

music whenever it had a suitable context, as it does when used as

accompaniment for war, the hajj, weddings and eid celebrations. He follows

this with reference to a work by Shaykh Abd al-Ghani al-Nabulusi

(1641-1731). In a work by that 17th century jurist of the Hanafi madhhab,

its author argues that almost every prohibition (tahrim) of musiqa in the

hadith literature is coupled with or conditioned by the mention of alcohol,

signing girls, dissoluteness (fusuq) or adultery. Both Shaltut and

al-Nabulusi therefore feel that the prohibition is based on the context and

associations, and is not a reaction against the music itself. The Prophet

Muhammad (pbuh) and many respected Muslims of the early period of Islamic

history have indeed listened to music and attended sessions of innocent

performance. Therefore, he concludes, as did many of his predecessors, that

the prohibition does not result from condemnation of music per se, but from

its use under the wrong circumstances or with morally debilitating

associations.

 

The Fourth and closing point made in Shaykh Shaltut’s fatwa on music repeats

Qur’anic argument also used by earlier protagonists of the use of musiqa

(al-Ghazali). Here the jurist cautions against the reckless forbidding of

what God did not forbid. Such false attributions to God, which he condemns

as slander and falsehood (iftira), are countered by Surah Al-A’raf, verse

32-33

 

[32, Say: Who is there to forbid the beauty which God has brought forth for

His creatures, and the good things among the means of sustenance?†Say:

“They are lawful in the life of this world unto all who have attained to

faith - to be theirs alone on resurrection Day.†Thus clearly do We spell

out these messages unto people of innate knowledge! 33, Say: “Verily, my

Sustainer has forbidden only shameful deeds, be they open or secret, and

every kind of sinning and unjustified envy, and the ascribing of divinity to

aught beside Him - since He has never bestowed any warrant therefore from on

high - and the attributing unto God of aught of which you have no

knowledge].

 

Shaykh Shaltut thus concludes that the general rule is that music is

permissible; its prohibition is the accident or exception caused by improper

usage.

Edited by Muslimah911

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Since the birth of Islam the permissibility of music and singing has been debated. Not only the lawfulness of the performer but also of the audience was discussed. Advocates and opponents alike traced the legitimacy of their position back to the Quran and the hadiths, the sayings of the Prophet. As in present day Egypt, these debates on the lawfulness of music did not prevent the art from flourishing in palaces and private homes (Sawa 1989; Stigelbauer 1975).

 

The seventeenth-century Muslim scholar Shalabi distinguishes three categories of music: that coming from birds, from the human throat and from instruments. He states that in Islam it is permissible to listen to the melodies produced by birds, and to those produced by the human throat, subject to certain conditions and rules. To listen to instruments that are blown or struck however, is never permissible (1957: 38). Certain instruments are forbidden because they are supposed to incite drinking. The kuba, an oblong drum, for instance, is prohibited because of its association with drinking wine, licentious songs and dissolute people. With respect to the human throat, if it produces songs about wine and debauchery, it is not permissible to listen to them (ibid.: 39).

 

According to the ethnomusicologist Al-Faruqi, religious opinion makes a hierarchy of music and singing in forbidden, unfavored, indifferent, recommended and commendable forms. The recitation of the Quran stands at the peak of the hierarchy, immediately followed by the call to prayer and religious chants. Also legitimate are various types of songs connected to family celebrations, caravan chants, work songs and the music of military bands. At the bottom of the hierarchy, we find “sensuous music that is performed in association with condemned activities, or that is thought to incite to such prohibited practices as consumption of drugs and alcohol, lust, prostitution etc.†(1985: 12). These genres are clearly forbidden, haram. Most forms of music and singing, though, fall between these clear categories and are controversial (Al-Faruqi 1985: 1-13).

 

The approval or disapproval of performers is not only related to the genre but also to the context of the performance. Regarding the permissibility of the context, three elements are deemed important by the eleventh-century Muslim scholar Imam al-Ghazali, that is, time, place and associates. It is not acceptable if too much time is devoted to performances so that it interferes with the higher Islamic goals and distracts the believers’ attention from the devotion to God. Full-time professional performers are accordingly less acceptable than non-professional amateurs. The acceptability of the place and occasion of the performance is also an important factor in judging the legitimacy of the entertainers and their public. Lastly, the type of people present during the performance affects the permissibility of the performers and their audience. A certain genre of music can thus be permissible in one context while it is rejected in another circumstance. Playing the tambourine is, for instance, acceptable if it is done by women at a wedding but forbidden if it is done by men in contexts of homosexuality or prostitution (Al-Faruqi 1985: 17-20; al-Ghazali 1902: 1).

 

Upper-Egyptian musicians playing

at a wedding procession

Religious discussions on dancing are less detailed and mainly deal with the nature of ecstatic states of mind. According to al-Ghazali, proper conduct during ecstasy and trance is also bound by the rules of time, place and company. Besides, if ecstacy overcomes a person and makes the person move without volition, it is excusable. Yet, when volition returns, stillness and restraint is preferred. The general rule is that: “If the pleasure which causes dancing is praiseworthy, and the dancing increases and strengthens it, then the dancing is praiseworthy (…).

 

Yet it is true that the practice of dancing does not befit the station of notable people who set an example, because most of the time, it springs from play and sport (…)†(al-Ghazali 1902: 9). We should keep in mind though that al-Ghazali discusses male ecstacy dancing in a religious setting and not female dancing in a secular context.

 

Although the impact of gender on the acceptability of performers has not received systematic attention, it is a crucial factor in the debates outlined above. A well-known phrase often cited to discredit female singers, is “sawt al-mar’a `awra,†“the voice of a woman is a shameful thing†(1).

 

Imam al-Ghazali explains this as follows. Music is allowed except if temptation is feared. The voice of women could seduce the listener. Looking at female performers is always unlawful. Listening to the voice of concealed female performers is still forbidden if it evokes tempting images. He continues reasoning that looking at a beardless boy is only forbidden if there is a danger for temptation. He then likens the lawfulness of listening to a concealed female singers to looking at a beardless young boy. The rule which must be followed, then, relates to the arousal of temptation, and if this is feared, it is unlawful (1901: 235-237).

 

Women are thus generally perceived as more enticing than men and excitement aroused by looking is considered more powerful than excitement aroused by listening. These observations have consequences for the lawfulness of the different forms of male and female performances. Female performances are more controversial and their acceptability depends on male experience of arousal. The fact that male excitement is most strongly aroused by the eye rather than the ear also affects the various categories of female performers. Female musicians have an audience. Female singers have an audience and, at least at present, spectators. Female dancers, on the other hand, are solely eye-catchers. Female dancing is accordingly considered the most shameful form of entertainment.

 

In order to understand the Islamic fundamentalist views on art and entertainment we cannot solely rely on the opinion of Muslim scholars of the eleventh or seventeenth century, but should also look into recent religious opinion leaders. According to the late Sheikh al-Azhar Shaltut, who wrote a fatwa (a formal ruling or opinion) on the issue in 1960, music is permissible under certain conditions. He argues that God is not against pleasure and that Islam seeks the Golden Means. Yet, it should not take place under immoral circumstances or with dissolute companions (Al-Faruqi 1985: 25-26). The Muslim scholar al-Qaradawi states that singing and music in itself is permissible and pleasurable. He places several restrictions on them though. The content of the song should not be against the morals and teachings of Islam or be accompanied by other forbidden things in Islam like alcohol. Also the way of singing should be within the confines of Islam, that is, it should not be accompanied by suggestive movements. Exaggeration is never preferable but certainly not in entertainment and the person who knows that entertainment easily excites him or her should keep away from it (Qaradawi 1985: 139; 289). During my research, the leading television preacher Sheikh Mitwalli al-Sha`arawi, stated that all female dancing is bad and that only music which does not “tickle the nerves†is permissible (The Economist 21-5-1988).

 

Most forms and contexts of art and entertainment in present-day Egypt are thus either controversial or forbidden, particularly for women as performers. So, although the Islamic fundamentalsts are the ones who actively try to abolish art and entertainment, their views on the unlawfulness of art and entertainment, especially for women, are shared by conservative and orthodox Muslim scholars as well. Why, then, are the voice and body of women considered forbidden things in Islam?

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:D

Majority of scholars call musical nasheeds haraam?

 

Yes.

 

From (www.)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_qa.sunnipath(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=1793&CATE=142"]Sunnipath:[/url]

Spiritual Music with Instruments -

 

There is difference of opinion on this issue, but the position conveyed by Mufti Muhammad ibn Adam al-Kawthari is the very same as that mentioned in the relied upon works across the Sunni schools of fiqh, and held by most traditional Sunni scholars now and in the past [see, for example, the entries on Music in the Reliance of the Traveller].

 

Some scholars did, in fact, allow instruments if not used for vain purposes, including in this the use of some Sufis and others of instruments for 'spiritually uplifting' purposes, as long as this was free of other impermissible matters (such as impermissible song content, female singing for non-females, free-mixing at such gatherings, etc.).

 

This remains a minority opinion, however, and religious precaution would indicate avoiding it, for the many reasons, explained by Mufti Muhammad ibn Adam in his answer.

 

At the same time, Ibn Abidin explains in his Radd al-Muhtar [6.349, Ilmiyya ed.], one should not condemn to those (like upright Sufis) who have noble intentions in their listening to such songs and are far from vain purposes (lahw), as long as nothing else impermissible is conjoined with the listening.

 

As such, religious caution and following sounder legal opinion (and the outward purport of the prohibitions of the Qur’an and Sunna) would indicate scrupulously avoiding music and singing with instruments besides the duff. However, one should not condemn others about this because of the difference of opinion regarding this.

 

And Allah knows best.

 

Wassalam,

Faraz Rabbani

 

:D

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From (www.)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_qa.sunnipath(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/issue_view.asp?HD=1&ID=1793&CATE=142"]Sunnipath:[/url]

 

Assalam Alaikum

 

Jazaak Allah Khair for the Link..

 

May Allah Bless you :D

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Yeah I am also starting to think the music IS permissible!! It depends on the lyrics though! There are some songs that describe a person as greater than God!! Those kinds of songs are obviously haraam!! As someone mentioned, it depends on the intention. A good song with good lyrics can make us get closer to God.

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Salaam,

 

It was/is a common part of the culture among many african tribes, including those that are muslim.

 

Imperial1

 

no doubt :D

 

btw, the best musician EVER was tansen khan--an indian musician and a convert to Islam during the mughal empire. it is said that he prayed to the All-Mighty through a song to bring rain during a time of prolonged famine. peace

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no doubt :D

 

btw, the best musician EVER was tansen khan--an indian musician and a convert to Islam during the mughal empire. it is said that he prayed to the All-Mighty through a song to bring rain during a time of prolonged famine. peace

 

:D

 

First of all, please provide evidence that he reverted. And, that his name was Khan.

 

Secondly, it makes no difference to the issue of music whether he was Muslim or Hindu.

 

Wassalam

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no doubt :D

 

btw, the best musician EVER was tansen khan--an indian musician and a convert to Islam during the mughal empire. it is said that he prayed to the All-Mighty through a song to bring rain during a time of prolonged famine. peace

 

Assalamu Alaykum wa Rahmatullahee wa Barakatu

 

People can have different opinions regarding music, but the actions of people does not make an action correct and permissible. The traditions of certain people is not a source of Sharee'ah. Just because people do it, does not mean it is Islamic. There is a difference of what people do and what Islam teaches.

 

The Messengers of Allah, alayhi salam, taught us how to pray and to make du'aa. I prefer to have famine all my life then praying in a manner that is incorrect.

 

Deeds are accepted if two conditions are met:

 

1. Ikhlaas - You do the deeds with the sincere intention that you do it for the sake of Allah, subhanahu wa ta'ala, alone.

 

2. Ittiba - You do the deeds according to the teachings of Muhammad, salla Allahu alayhi wa sallam. You cannot just invent the way you worship, but you have to immitate the way of the prophets, for us Muhammad, but not the ways of our forefathers and current trends.

 

If the deeds do not fulfill the above conditions they will be void on the Day of Judgment, Insha'Allah.

 

 

 

 

I personally do not have any clear opinion because I realized that on both sides there are many explanations which seem to make sense. I do not give an opinion because I am in the middle of studying the issue. It may take years until I come to a conclusion.

 

 

Salam

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Assalamu Alaykum wa Rahmatullahee wa Barakatu

 

It does not matter if you regard music/nasheed as permissable or unlawful, but there is something to remember regardless what position we have:

 

1. Somewhere here in this forums, there was a thread about that there are so many who study Tajweed. There are so many Qari, but nobody is interested in studying fiqh to become a faqeeh. While Qari increase the fuqahaa' (Islamic jurists) decrease in number. We all know that reading and reciting Qur'an is musta'hab or even wajib. To become a Qari is an honourable thing, but there is a criticism against the fact that so many prefer to be Qari than Faqeeh. I believe that there are so many Qari who are learned but there are also so many Qari who do not have the understanding of Sharee'ah in general and there are maybe not many fuqahaa' (jurists), or usoolis (scholars of figh), or scholars of Aqeedah, muhadditheen (scholars of hadeeth) among the Qari. The amount of Qari is huge. With Qari, I mean those who recite for the public or on stage or on cd's. Qur'an is preserved by the Hafiz Qur'an. One can become a Hafiz Qur'an without becoming a Qari. To learn Qur'an just to become a Qari is not enough. The intention is to preserve the Qur'an and to recite during Ramadhan and during regular prayers. However, when it comes to fiqh then the number who study it is small compared to the Qari.

 

2. The above shows that although studying Qur'an is very important and essential for the preservation of Qur'an, there are complaints that many want to become Qari, instead of a faqeeh. We see that the number of Qari outweigh the number of faqeeh. However, we also see that the number of those who perform nasheed outweigh the Qari. It is difficult to learn Qur'an but it is easy to write and perform a nasheed/inshaad. There are so many who do not study to be Qari who become Nasheed-Stars. I believe if an honourable thing as becoming a Qari can cause that we have not enough fuqahaa' (knowledgeable in fiqh/those who have understanding in religion), then we imagine that the new nasheed boom makes it even much more difficult to encourage people to become a faqeeh. Most of them are not even Qari. Around every corner we see nasheed bands and chanters because it is easier to become that.

 

3. With nasheed I mean those who play nasheed without musical instruments. They recite the nasheeds without music. The next step is Islamic music. The whole world is immersed in music and entertainment, so many who do not have the understanding in religion just compose Songs with Islamic contents. They follow the trends of the time but their lyrics is about Islam. However, most of them are not very deep in meaning, very dull and superficial. However, you find these Musicians everywhere and they are outnumbering those who just do nasheed. This means that they are even further away from learning Qur'an and becoming a Qari, let alone becoming a faqeeh. If there are so many Qari but so less Faqeeh, how come people then prefer to do nasheed and Music instead of going to the other direction. If you combine the amount of Qari, those who make nasheed and Musicians then that number compared to the fuqahaa' must be in great majority. If becoming Qari or a Nasheed Performer, can lead us away from fiqh, or studying fiqh, how then can worldly music with instruments lead people away from learning fiqh and becoming a faqeeh.

 

4. In the lecture of Imam Anwar Al Awlaki (Life of Muhammad Makkan Period, salla Allahu alayhi wa sallam), the Imam teaches how a profession can have an effect on our personality. We know that Muhammad in his early years was a shephard of sheep. The shaikh explained why the prophets, alayhi salam, are shephards of sheep or goats in particular. They are compassionate animals and their compassion and weakness makes the shephard very soft, patient, and compassionate. If the prophets were shephards of camels the job would have effected their personality. They would be very tough and arrogant and rude, because one must be rude when dealing with camels because they can be arrogant and difficult to deal with. Not just the job or professions shape our personality, but also what ever we do in our sparetime. Learning a musical instrument will certainly have an effect on our personality, and most of the time we even do not realize it. (by the way, in the time we learn the musical instrument we could have learned and memorized the entire Qur'an or we could have finished with studying fiqh/Sharee'ah). Being a musician will have an effect in our general behaviour and in our personality in general. As musicians we would to things that we would not do if we were fuqahaa' or muhadditheen or Qari.

 

4. Melody should be a tool for memorization nor entertainment. Melody is meant for the facilitation of memorization of Qur'an, du'aa, dhikr, or teachings. I believe that melody has an effect on our minds, because our minds uses melody for memorization. If the contents of that what is memorized is not good then it is going to be something bad. It is like a rolemodel. Every human being needs to have rolemodels. If the rolemodels are not good they are going to be bad. If the trustworthy, truthful, and righteous are not the rolemodels then they choose the untrustworthy to be their rolemodels. The same with studying. If they cannot study fiqh they will study something else. If they don't memorize something beneficial then they memorize something that causes fitna. If we listen to a melody, this melody will be in our minds. If the melody is bad then what we memorize is bad. If the melody is beneficial then we memorize something good. We should keep our minds pure from bad things. Allah gave us the vision, the hearing, and the minds so that we may be grateful. These are tools and they should be treated well. We receive our minds as a trust from God Almighty.

 

I remember that when I go to bed that during the sleep sometimes I dream about the melody that I listened to while in my bed before falling asleep. Sometimes, when I wake up the first thing that comes into my mind is the melody. If the melody is bad then my waking up is bad because I did not wake up remembering Allah AND I MUST BE HAPPY THAT I DID NOT DIE IN MY SLEEP. However, if you listen to Qur'an or to a lecture while you in bed and then fall asleep while the audio still on then you may have the lessons and sayings and recitations in you mind when falling asleep, while in deep sleep, and when you wake up. You remember Allah, subhanahu wa ta'ala, during sleep and if you die during sleep the you die remembering Allah, insha'Allah. Our mind is very sensitive. If memorizes whatever our hearings delivers it with.

 

Imagine there is a tiny truck inside you ear. The sound waves are delivered to the truck, and the truck driver loads the load into the truck and then transports it through the ear to the mind. The mind is like a warehouse where all the information is stored and stocked. If the load inside the truck is good then we will benefit but if the load is bad or damaged or wrong then we may be in disadvantage. There could be hidden defects. Melody is a tool to memorize and if you listen to music you memorize it if you want it or not.

 

One time, I was singing all the time: Radheetu billahee rabban, wa bi Muhammadan Rasoolan, wa bil Islami deenan until is fell asleep. When I woke up it was still in my mind. One time, I listened to a recitation by Hussary or Abdulbaset, and when I woke up I was remembering a phrase. One time, I was listening intensively to songs with bad texts: I remembered it when I woke up. It was the first thing I remembered. Sometimes, I was so much immersed in music that I could not hear the alarm clock because I had other melodies in my mind. Sometime, a melody gets stuck in my mind and I have trouble getting it out of my mind. I almost go crazy because I cannot concentrate on my exam because the melody is in my mind, intoxicating my mind.

 

When I recite dhikr, du'aa with melody in my bed I many times realized that they remain in my mind and I memorized them during sleep and when I woke up they were the first things in my mind.

 

5. Allah, subhanahu wa ta'ala, destroyed the people of Thamud with sound waves. We don't know how the sound waves of music affects our body, psyche, and spiritual.

 

 

These are just thoughts that are in my head.

 

Allah knows best

 

Salam

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:D / Peace to all,

 

Interesting thoughts brother...

 

:D for sharing it with us. I do agree in points where you said what we hear sticks in our head. That is so true... :D

 

 

Sis Zabrina

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:D brother, great post.

We see that the number of Qari outweigh the number of faqeeh.

Yes that's true, but I think it is mainly because of the difference between the two, rather than the willingness of people. It takes a lot more time to become a faqeeh than a qari. So naturally there is going to be a big difference in their numbers.

 

However, we also see that the number of those who perform nasheed outweigh the Qari.

 

I may be wrong, but it doesn't seem like there are more nasheed (w/out music) artists than Qari's.

 

Allah knows best.

:D

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