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Why I Shed Bikini For Niqab

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:sl:

 

For the Sisters

 

Why I Shed Bikini for Niqab[using large font size is not allowed]

 

- By Sara Bokker

 

The New Symbol of Women’s Liberation

I am an American woman who was born in the midst of America’s “Heartland.†I grew up, just like any other girl, being fixated with the glamour of life in “the big city.†Eventually, I moved to Florida and on to South Beach of Miami, a hotspot for those seeking the “glamorous life.†Naturally, I did what most average Western girls do. I focused on my appearance and appeal, basing my self-worth on how much attention I got from others. I worked out religiously and became a personal trainer, acquired an upscale waterfront residence, became a regular “exhibiting†beach-goer and was able to attain a “living-in-style†kind of life.

 

Years went by, only to realize that my scale of self-fulfillment and happiness slid down the more I progressed in my “feminine appeal.†I was a slave to fashion. I was a hostage to my looks.

 

As the gap continued to progressively widen between my self-fulfillment and lifestyle, I sought refuge in escapes from alcohol and parties to meditation, activism, and alternative religions, only to have the little gap widen to what seemed like a valley. I eventually realized it all was merely a pain killer rather than an effective remedy.

 

By now it was September 11, 2001. As I witnessed the ensuing barrage on Islam, Islamic values and culture, and the infamous declaration of the “new crusade,†I started to notice something called Islam. Up until that point, all I had associated with Islam was women covered in “tents,†wife beaters, harems, and a world of terrorism.

 

As a feminist libertarian, and an activist who was pursuing a better world for all, my path crossed with that of another activist who was already at the lead of indiscriminately furthering causes of reform and justice for all. I joined in the ongoing campaigns of my new mentor which included, at the time, election reform and civil rights, among others. Now my new activism was fundamentally different. Instead of “selectively†advocating justice only to some, I learned that ideals such as justice, freedom, and respect are meant to be and are essentially universal, and that own good and common good are not in conflict. For the first time, I knew what “all people are created equal†really means. But most importantly, I learned that it only takes faith to see the world as one and to see the unity in creation.

 

One day I came across a book that is negatively stereotyped in the West--The Holy Qur’an. I was first attracted by the style and approach of the Qur’an, and then intrigued by its outlook on existence, life, creation, and the relationship between Creator and creation. I found the Qur’an to be a very insightful address to heart and soul without the need for an interpreter or pastor.

 

Eventually I hit a moment of truth: my new-found self-fulfilling activism was nothing more than merely embracing a faith called Islam where I could live in peace as a “functional†Muslim.

 

I bought a beautiful long gown and head cover resembling the Muslim woman’s dress code and I walked down the same streets and neighborhoods where only days earlier I had walked in my shorts, bikini, or “elegant†western business attire. Although the people, the faces, and the shops were all the same, one thing was remarkably distinct--I was not--nor was the peace at being a woman I experienced for the very first time. I felt as if the chains had been broken and I was finally free. I was delighted with the new looks of wonder on people’s faces in place of the looks of a hunter watching his prey I had once sought. Suddenly a weight had been lifted off my shoulders. I no longer spent all my time consumed with shopping, makeup, getting my hair done, and working out. Finally, I was free.

 

Of all places, I found my Islam at the heart of what some call “the most scandalous place on earth,†which makes it all the more dear and special.

 

While content with Hijab I became curious about Niqab, seeing an increasing number of Muslim women in it. I asked my Muslim husband, whom I married after I reverted to Islam, whether I should wear Niqab or just settle for the Hijab I was already wearing. My husband simply advised me that he believes Hijab is mandatory in Islam while Niqab is not. At the time, my Hijab consisted of head scarf that covered all my hair except for my face, and a loose long black gown called “Abaya†that covered all my body from neck to toe.

 

A year-and-a-half passed, and I told my husband I wanted to wear Niqab. My reason, this time, was that I felt it would be more pleasing to Allah, the Creator, increasing my feeling of peace at being more modest. He supported my decision and took me to buy an “Isdaal,†a loose black gown that covers from head to toe, and Niqab, which covers all my head and face except for my eyes.

 

Soon enough, news started breaking about politicians, Vatican clergymen, libertarians, and so-called human rights and freedom activists condemning Hijab at times, and Niqab at others as being oppressive to women, an obstacle to social integration, and more recently, as an Egyptian official called it--“a sign of backwardness.â€

 

I find it to be a blatant hypocrisy when Western governments and so-called human rights groups rush to defend woman’s rights when some governments impose a certain dress code on women, yet such “freedom fighters†look the other way when women are being deprived of their rights, work, and education just because they choose to exercise their right to wear Niqab or Hijab. Today, women in Hijab or Niqab are being increasingly barred from work and education not only under totalitarian regimes such as in Tunisia, Morocco, and Egypt, but also in Western democracies such as France, Holland, and Britain.

 

Today I am still a feminist, but a Muslim feminist, who calls on Muslim women to assume their responsibilities in providing all the support they can for their husbands to be good Muslims. To raise their children as upright Muslims so they may be beacons of light for all humanity once again. To enjoin good--any good--and to forbid evil--any evil. To speak righteousness and to speak up against all ills. To fight for our right to wear Niqab or Hijab and to please our Creator whichever way we chose. But just as importantly to carry our experience with Niqab or Hijab to fellow women who may never have had the chance to understand what wearing Niqab or Hijab means to us and why do we, so dearly, embrace it.

 

Most of the women I know wearing Niqab are Western reverts, some of whom are not even married. Others wear Niqab without full support of either family or surroundings. What we all have in common is that it is the personal choice of each and every one of us, which none of us is willing to surrender.

 

Willingly or unwillingly, women are bombarded with styles of “dressing-in-little-to-nothing†virtually in every means of communication everywhere in the world. As an ex non-Muslim, I insist on women’s right to equally know about Hijab, its virtues, and the peace and happiness it brings to a woman’s life as it did to mine. Yesterday, the bikini was the symbol of my liberty, when in actuality it only liberated me from my spirituality and true value as a respectable human being.

 

I couldn’t be happier to shed my bikini in South Beach and the “glamorous†Western lifestyle to live in peace with my Creator and enjoy living among fellow humans as a worthy person. It is why I choose to wear Niqab, and why I will die defending my inalienable right to wear it.

 

Today, Niqab is the new symbol of woman’s liberation to find who she is, what her purpose is, and the type of relation she chooses to have with her Creator.

 

 

To women who surrender to the ugly stereotype against the Islamic modesty of Hijab, I say: You don’t know what you are missing.

 

To you, the ill-fated corrupting conquerors of civilization, so-called crusaders, I say: BRING IT ON.

 

Sara Bokker is a former actress/model/fitness instructor and activist. Currently, Sara is Director of Communications at “The March For Justice,†a co-founder of “The Global Sisters Network,†and producer of the infamous “Shock & Awe Gallery©.â€

 

 

Source: (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetweneedtounite(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/shed.htm"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetweneedtounite(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/shed.htm[/url]

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PropellerAds

:sl:

 

May Allah bless all our beautiful Sisters and the reverts to this beautiful way of life :sl:

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Asalaamu aleykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

 

Subhanallah, beautiful story brother,

May Allah Azza wa Jall continue to bless this sister with her life and work! :sl:

 

waleykum assalaam,

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I wish she would come to this forum and give us some da'wah....

May Allah show her the right path

 

Salam=Peace

Vishah

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:sl:

:sl: for sharing.

This is truely refreshing. Alhamdulillaah.

 

May Allah guide her and all of us to the straight path and make us steady on it, and never let us fall on the time of our test of our iman.Ameen.

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:sl:

 

Jazak Allah for sharing this...

 

 

Allah Bless all the Muslimahs

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Muslim women don't have to wear veils: Queen Rania

 

Fri Feb 9, 6:41 AM ET

 

ROME (AFP) - Islam does not require women to wear veils, Queen Rania al-Abdullah of Jordan has said in an interview, calling on Muslim moderates to "make their voices be heard."

 

"Islam neither requires one to be practising, nor to dress in one way or another," the stylish 36-year-old queen told the Italian daily Corriere della Sera during a visit to Rome on Friday.

 

"So imposing the veil on a woman is contrary to the principles of Islam," said Queen Rania, who is in Rome for the launch of a Group of Seven (G7) programme to develop vaccines against diseases that are endemic in poor countries.

 

"Unfortunately, after all the suspicion weighing on Islam, many people have begun to consider the veil as a political problem, but this is not the case," she told Corriere. "Wearing the veil is a free personal choice."

 

Queen Rania urged "all moderates to stand up and let their voices be heard."

 

She added: "Many people are frustrated in the Arab world. Many give in to the anger because they are accused of violence. But instead we should get up, explain who we are and what we believe in.

 

"Over the last three years, most victims of terrorism have been Muslim. So there's not a war between Muslims and non-Muslims, but between extremists and moderates of all the religions," the queen said.

 

"What is important is not to live in fear. The most dangerous (thing to do) is to give up and lose hope. The main enemy is not terrorism or extremism, but ignorance," she said.

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yeteuro-Islam.info/spip/article.php3?id_article=280"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yeteuro-Islam.info/spip/article.php3?id_article=280[/url]

 

--------------

 

glad there is still some discussion on this, i can respect individuals choices to dress as they wish.

Edited by gnuneo

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Post deleted. Sorry, I posted in the wrong thread.

 

Wassalam,

Yasnov

Edited by Yasnov

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"Islam neither requires one to be practising, nor to dress in one way or another," the stylish 36-year-old queen told the Italian daily Corriere della Sera during a visit to Rome on Friday.

 

:sl:!

 

I guess she believes Islam enhances her, err, stylishness. Poor delusional woman.

 

 

And a truly beautiful reversion story, jazakallah khair for sharing, may Allah give her a blessed life and hereafter.

 

Salam.

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:sl:

 

... :sl:

May Allah(SWT) give her a strong faith!

Edited by hira

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Truly Inspiring story...especially for 1 hijabi Muslima :sl:

 

I'm most amazed by 99% of revert stories told ... that the words of the Quran awakened them.

 

And for women, the experience of being closer to their Lord and creator is what encourages them to wear Hijab, Mashallah.

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Truly Inspiring story...especially for 1 hijabi Muslima :sl:

 

I'm most amazed by 99% of revert stories told ... that the words of the Quran awakened them.

 

And for women, the experience of being closer to their Lord and creator is what encourages them to wear Hijab, Mashallah.

 

 

What exactly does it say in teh Quran about women wearing face masks?

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Salaam,

 

The niqaab is one of the touchy subjects so it has a whole section to itself in the contraversial issues section. It's not mentioned directly in the Quran but there are descriptions in the hadith of Mohammed's wives being 'dressed like crows' and 'only showing one eye to see where they were going' etc (sorry for the awful paraphrasing)

 

There is a dispute between scholars as to whether it is obligatory or just a 'good'. There's more information in the section.

 

Peace and Love,

 

DARLA

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Assalmu Alakum,

 

Jazaka'Allahu Kar for sharing that story!! I am extremely pleased that she recognized Tunisia as having some issues with the hijab. The reason why I am saying this is because I am tunisian, even though I dont live in Tunisia everytime I go there I fear what the police might do to me because I am wearing it. Insha'Allah the Ummah will grow stronger and allow women to choose whether to wear the hijab or not!!

 

Peace!

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having some issues with the hijab. The reason why I am saying this is because I am tunisian, even though I dont live in Tunisia everytime I go there I fear what the police might do to me because I am wearing it.

:sl:

Really?! wearing hijab in the streets is now a crime in Tunisia?

How come an Islamic country do such a horrible restriction?

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Assalamu alaikum, That's what I heard too, but I thought wearing Hijaab if you are in the working field is illegal, not that it is something to be taken lightly. I heard it is the same issue with the Beard, you cannot have a beard if you want to work for any govt. post. When my Tuniaian friends talk about back home (Tunisis), it feels like theyare talking about a second TURKEY.

 

Akhi dot, they have the same problem in Egypt for people working in the govt. offices?

Assalamu alaikum, umAhmad.

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:no:

 

you cannot have a beard if you want to work for any govt

 

Watch me. :sl:

 

:D

 

I think any able company will look at the qualities of the person rather then if they have a beard or niqab,inshallah.

 

If they wanna discriminate cos of them,its their lose really. :sl:

 

:j:

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:sl:

 

:j: for sharing this beneficial article with us.

 

:sl:

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:sl:

Akhi dot, they have the same problem in Egypt for people working in the govt. offices?

No way, they can't do that. Masha'Allah about 80% of women in Egypt wear the hijab.

But unfortunately many private sector companies refuse to employ hijabi women.

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:sl:

 

^^ :sl: that's great to hear.. I've always wanted to visit egypt, but a little apprehensive because I didn't know about their hijaab policies.

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Assalmu Alakum,

 

Really?! wearing hijab in the streets is now a crime in Tunisia?

How come an Islamic country do such a horrible restriction?

 

Yeah. If you go to school, work in a government office and you want to wear the hijab you cant. YOu will lose your job. Or be kicked out of school.

I am not sure 100% if this is true but my cousin, who lives in Tunisia, said that this one girl who is in high school started to wear the hijab and probably will get kicked out.

Also, my cousin's cousin wears the hijab and the police came to there house telling her that she needed to take off the hijab........

Like the Sister said......Tunis is the second Turkey....its funny because both coutries start with TU and their flags are almost identicle!

 

I dont understand what it happening with the world!!!!

 

Peace!

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I think any able company will look at the qualities of the person rather then if they have a beard or niqab,inshallah.

 

If they wanna discriminate cos of them,its their lose really. :sl:

 

It's almost like thinking that if a person is covered or has a beard that automaticaly diminishes their intelectual capabilities. If a woman has a PhD and one day converts to Islam and starts wearing hijab or nigab does that mean that her inteligence and professional expertize dissapear overnight turning her ito a tweet? :sl:

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