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Julius Caesar

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salams

 

Oh man I procrastinated! I'm supposed to memorize a speech in Julius Caesar and translate what he's saying. I don't know how to translate Shakespeare! Please help me.

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PropellerAds

Very true, whish I could help you but I'm a bit crap at literature. Which book contains the speach? Could ask some other people and when is it due?

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Very true, whish I could help you but I'm a bit crap at literature. Which book contains the speach? Could ask some other people and when is it due?

 

The book is in my Literature Book, which we cannot take home. No, I asked everyone I know and they don't have the same project and since I was sick, I might be able to hold it off until Tuesday.

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Man I need to find a way to translate this into modern English! Can someone help me?!

 

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

Like a Colossus, and we petty men

Walk under his huge legs and peep about

To find ourselves dishonourable graves.

Men at some time are masters of their fates:

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,

But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?

Why should that name be sounded more than yours?

Write them together, yours is as fair a name;

Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;

Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,

Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.

Now, in the names of all the gods at once,

Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,

That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

Like a Colossus, and we petty men

Walk under his huge legs and peep about

To find ourselves dishonourable graves.

 

>>>>>>>>The 'he' they are referring to is a 'big man'/boss/chief. He is strong and powerful. All the men around him are like little ants running around his legs.<<<<<<<

 

Men at some time are masters of their fates:

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,

But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

 

>>>>>>When things go wrong, it's our own fault, not the fault of fate, karma or bad luck (in our stars).<<<<<<<<<

 

 

Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?

Why should that name be sounded more than yours?

Write them together, yours is as fair a name;

Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;

Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,

Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.

 

>>>>>Cassius is trying to persuade Brutus that he is as important as Caesar, that his name deserves to be shouted in the streets as much and that Brutus should also become a Caesar.<<<<<

 

Now, in the names of all the gods at once,

Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,

That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!

 

>>>>this makes more sense if you read the next few lines too but it's generally saying 'How come one man is so great, what has he been eating (doing) to make him so'.<<<<<<

 

 

 

 

I've not studied JC before, but that sounds like what it should be saying.

 

Peace and Love,

 

DARLA

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

Like a Colossus, and we petty men

Walk under his huge legs and peep about

To find ourselves dishonourable graves.

 

>>>>>>>>The 'he' they are referring to is a 'big man'/boss/chief. He is strong and powerful. All the men around him are like little ants running around his legs.<<<<<<<

 

Men at some time are masters of their fates:

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,

But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

 

>>>>>>When things go wrong, it's our own fault, not the fault of fate, karma or bad luck (in our stars).<<<<<<<<<

Brutus and Caesar: what should be in that 'Caesar'?

Why should that name be sounded more than yours?

Write them together, yours is as fair a name;

Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well;

Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em,

Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.

 

>>>>>Cassius is trying to persuade Brutus that he is as important as Caesar, that his name deserves to be shouted in the streets as much and that Brutus should also become a Caesar.<<<<<

 

Now, in the names of all the gods at once,

Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed,

That he is grown so great? Age, thou art shamed!

 

>>>>this makes more sense if you read the next few lines too but it's generally saying 'How come one man is so great, what has he been eating (doing) to make him so'.<<<<<<

I've not studied JC before, but that sounds like what it should be saying.

 

Peace and Love,

 

DARLA

 

Thank you! *bhangras* Thank you! You really saved me there!

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