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Frank

Linguistic Hangovers

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This thread belongs in the Western Dialogue forum but I find that I'm not allowed to post there.

 

English (and I assume other European languages) has a lot of references to pre-Christian religions. The weekdays, for example refer to Woden (leader of Norse gods; Wednesday), Thor (another Norse god; Thursday), Saturn (Roman version of Dionysis, I think, related to Satyrs; Saturday). This is pretty amazing when you consider the small things that 'heretics' have been burned for down the millenia. Presumably the Church(s) pragmatically decided that changing the names of the days would be too difficult and ignored it.

 

Does Arabic have the same sort of thing, or were non-Islamic references purged from the language?

Edited by Frank

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PropellerAds

Salaam,

 

In English the relationship is there, as it is in German and (though to a lesser extent, I believe) in French. However, isn't that as irrelevent to the behaviour of the Church as the words for pig, cow and sheep?

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_en.wikipedia(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/wiki/Days_of_the_week"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_en.wikipedia(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/wiki/Days_of_the_week[/url] suggests that ecclesiastical Latin, ie: the language the Church was interested in, uses a numerical system. The table says Arabic also follows a numerical system of numbering.

 

Peace and Love,

 

DARLA

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However, isn't that as irrelevent to the behaviour of the Church as the words for pig, cow and sheep?

 

Well, apparently, but it surprises me. The early Christian evangelists made a point of cutting down every saced oak tree that could when they swept through Europe. I'm surprised that having a day of the week called Wodin's Day or Thor's Day or Freja's Day didn't attract their attention. And much later when burning offences were extremely minor you'd think that some zealous eclesiatic would have considered cleaning up the weekday names. But apparently not.

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The days of the week in Arabic are named after the Arabic numbers.

 

Al-Ahad (Sunday)- Comes from the word waahid, which means one.

Al-Ithnayn (Monday) - Comes fom the word ithnayn, which means two.

A-Thulatha (Tuesday) - Comes from the word thalatha, which means three.

Al-Arbi'aa (Wednesday) - Comes from the word arba'a, which means four.

Al-Qamees (Thursday) - Comes from the word qamsa, which means five.

Al-Jum'ah (Friday)- Comes from the word Jamaa'ah, which means congregation. It refers to friday prayer.

As-Sabt (Saturday) - Not sure about this one, but I've heard it means "rest".

 

They usually have the word "Yaum" in front of them, meaning "day". Basically, they mean day one, day two, day three, day four, day five, day of congregation, and day of rest.

 

Salam.

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