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I didn't want to hijack another thread, so I'm starting a new thread.

 

I am a revert of about a year and a half. I am a sort of closet Muslim. That is not how I like it, but for now it seems to be the only way. By closet Muslim, I mean that not everyone knows I am a Muslim. Everyone that I chat with (real life friends included), and two of my real life friends knows it. No one else does. The reason for this is that my family would not understand. They do not understand the real Islam. They only understand what they've been taught, read in books, and seen on tv. They make comments like "them Muslims", and believe things like the 70 virgins for a man in heaven. I am from a small town in the Southern US.

 

My parents are devout Christians, as I was before my conversion. They do not understand Islam, and would believe I was going to hell. My mother is in bad health, and I couldn't stand the thought of her thinking I was going to hell and something happening to her. So I just try to find times to talk about the real Islam.

 

My children and ex-husband do not know also for these reasons. They just do not understand. So I do the same; try to find times to talk about the real Islam, and they see me reading the forums and stuff. If my ex knew he would take my kids away. Normally, he couldn't take my kids away for that, but because I cannot support them or me right now and he is supporting us all, he would stop it and take them. I am trying to finish out my degree and find a job that would pay the bills. Unfortunately, I have a little while longer on my degree, and it's very hard to find a job right now. Much less one that pays the bills. So I just try to show them the real Islam and pray a lot.

 

Second issue; praying. I do not know how to pray correctly, because I'm always surrounded by people and can't learn because they don't know I'm Muslim. I try to pray when I'm alone, but it's not that often, and I am not doing well. All of that Arabic is hard for a beginner and even harder with the motions of prayer. I was praying in my bathroom(only door that locks and I can be alone) until someone told me that is forbidden. So now I just try to do it when I'm alone. This is not allowing me to do my five prayers a day in the correct manner. I pray at least that much, but I pray as a Christian. Not to Jesus, but in mind, silently. I even try to remember the words of the prayer. So while I'm praying, it's not in the way I should be. Is that better than nothing?

 

My online friends and one friend that knows about me encourage me to learn and do my obligatory prayers. They don't encourage me to tell my family, as it seems it would do more harm than good at this point. But oh I wait and pray for the time that I can be me, a Muslim, and pray the way I'm supposed to.

 

Third issue; ex-husband. I call him my ex because I plan on getting a divorce and we are separated. But in reality, we are still married on paper and he lives in the same home, because he is supporting us until I get to where I can. Also, he works out of town a lot, so he's normally not here a lot. But lately, because of there being no work he is laid off. So he's here a lot. Thank God he still wants to help us out like he does. He is a good man for that. Also, we have to stay married on paper because of the insurance. My medicines cost $1,000/month without insurance. I am bipolar and need these meds. so.... I know I'm not supposed to stay married to a Christian man, but what do I do?

 

Fourth issue; no masjid: I live in a small country town, and don't know where a local masjid is. I know they are in the big city like an hour away from me, but know of nothing local. I would go to one if I could find it and could get away. I'm assuming they would help me learn to pray and stuff?

 

So basically, I'm a closet Muslim. :sl:

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PropellerAds

Asalamualaikum

Welcome to Islam

May Allah protect you and keep you safe

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetyoutube(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/view_play_list?p=85A0EC87D924601C"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetyoutube(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/view_play_list?p=85A0EC87D924601C[/url]

 

This is a set of videos that teach you how to pray step by step. I hope you find them beneficial

Edited by al-malibari

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:sl:

 

Sister you need some Scholarly advise, you can post your question to an Islamic Scholar here (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetislamqa(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/en"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetislamqa(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/en[/url]

 

May Allah make it easy for you. Ameen

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:sl:

 

Sister you need some Scholarly advise, you can post your question to an Islamic Scholar here (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetislamqa(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/en"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetislamqa(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/en[/url]

 

May Allah make it easy for you. Ameen

 

:sl:

 

I agree with this post. This is a very, very sensitive issue and I'm not sure that any of us, being ordinary Muslims, could ever give you appropriate advice.

 

The least we can do is help you learn how to perform prayer. And maybe help you find a nearby Masjid. Perhaps you could try google. If you type your city and "local masjid", it might pull something up.

 

Sister, do not give up. There is no hardship in this world that doesn't have a solution. Pray to Allah constantly and He will guide you through this. After all, Allah tells us in the Qur'an that with every hardship comes ease.

 

I pray that you will get through this with increased iman and dedication to Allah. May He reward you greatly for striving in His cause.

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Thanks for all your replies and links. I have checked them out and am still checking out the prayer one. (there are several movies) I also found this link online, which is good. you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetislamicfinder(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/ You pop in your zip code or country and it helps you find a local masjid. I did find one only 20 miles from my home. So that is not too bad. I'll call them and check it out.

 

Another question? Is there a door for men and women, or can I just go in the front door? I've heard something about this before, is why I'm asking. I don't want to do anything wrong.

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I tried to add a link, and I don't have enough posts to add it. It did say to contact an admin if it was beneficial, but I can't message anyone.

 

Just go to Islamicfinder(contact admin if its a beneficial link) and it has a directory to locate local masjids and Muslim businesses all over the world. I think that is a beneficial link. :sl:

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Another question? Is there a door for men and women, or can I just go in the front door? I've heard something about this before, is why I'm asking. I don't want to do anything wrong.

 

:sl:

 

Are you talking about the door for a Masjid? If yes then normaly there are seperate entrances for brothers and sisters,depending on the Masjid if they have a prayer area for sisters.

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:sl:

 

Zaynab, the daughter of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). She was married to Abu’l-‘Aas ibn al-Rabee’ during the Jaahiliyyah (times of ignorance), but when she became Muslim, their marriage was annulled, and she went and stayed with her father (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). When her husband became Muslim, the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) sent her back to him.

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I didn't want to hijack another thread, so I'm starting a new thread.

 

So basically, I'm a closet Muslim. :sl:

 

In regards to your family i hope this article is beneficial:

 

Being a new muslim in a family of non-muslims

 

 

First of all, if you are in the position of being a new muslim in a family of non-muslims, then many congratulations to you, and alhamdulillah that you have been guided to what we believe is the right path. May Allah(swt) reward you for your efforts in getting this far, and may Allah (swt) shower many blessings on you. May you be guided through this transition in your life and may your faith grow stronger with each day. May you become an excellent muslim and through your example may others be inspired, and may your family find a contentment in your decision through your new found happiness in your life, inshaAllah.

 

 

Telling your family you have become a Muslim

 

For some muslim converts telling their family of their decision is no problem at all. Some families of converts are very happy at the choice to become a muslim, and it is welcomed. Unfortunately though for other converts this is a difficult process, with various obstacles to face.

 

 

Let us start by reminding ourselves what the Qur’an says (2.286):

 

Allah (swt) does not impose upon any soul a duty but to the extent of it's ability; for it is (the benefit of) what it has earned, and upon it (the evil of) what it has wrought: Our Lord! do not punish us if we forget or make a mistake; Our Lord! do not lay on us a burden as Thou didst lay on those before us; Our Lord! do not impose upon us that which we have not the strength to bear; and pardon us and grant us protection and have mercy on us, Thou art our Patron, so help us against the unbelieving people.

 

If we keep this in mind we will be fine.

 

Alhumdalillah, as converts, Allah (swt) immediately allows us this opportunity to spread Islam within our family and inshaAllah earn some good deeds.

 

Your family are not at all religious and cannot understand why you would want to become religious.

 

BEING A NEW MUSLIM IN A FAMILY OF NON-MUSLIMS

 

It is sad when people feel that religion is not important. I cannot understand how any person could be content to go through life and not think about what comes after their death. Some people are happy to live for today and not worry about tomorrow. Unfortunately this then leads them to question other people who do have a religion. They wonder why religious people bother to waste their time with religion, they think that time spent performing religious duties could be spent in a 'more enjoyable' way. They cannot see the spiritual gains in religious actions.

 

There are also people who like to 'put down' others who are religious because they themselves are scared. They think that there might be something in religion, they wonder if perhaps there is a God and a point to life. But as they have not bothered to make any investigations for themselves they do not like to be reminded of the fate that they suspect might await them. If they are not looking into religion, despite their doubts, then they do not want anyone else to either.

Of course there is always hope with all people. Many individuals have no interest in religion, then a spark is ignited within them, and through the Mercy of Allah (swt) they are guided.

 

If your family are of the second category then at least you have something more to work with. If your family think that there might be something in religion, but have not made any attempt to find out, then perhaps you now have the opportunity to help them. You could perhaps explain how you found religion, the books you read, the people you spoke to. What was it that convinced you about Islam? I think you need to take a soft approach, if possible let them find out some information for themselves. If you go in 'all guns blazing' then this may just add to their guilt that they haven't looked into religion themselves, and they may feel anger towards you. A gentle approach, asking them what they think and getting them to give their opinion on matters, I think would work best. InshaAllah they will develop their own interest in religion and then in time start to feel very relieved that they are now acting upon the thoughts that they had previously been battling against.

 

If your parents are of the first category, ie just can't see the point in religion, then you could try to make them understand that there is a point. This may need to start with proving to them that God does exist. This is really too much to get into now, but there are many websites that could help with this quest. Please contact ZAYNAB5[at]AOL(contact admin if its a beneficial link) if you would like to be pointed in the right direction.

 

Of course your parents, despite your hard efforts, may still be uninterested in religion, and may still be unhappy at your choice to be a muslim. In this situation we suggest that you try and point out to them that your new religion does not change who you are. They still have their son or daughter that they always had. In many ways your parents have gained, please refer to 'Duty to Parents' and 'Treatment of Non-Muslims' in the previous solution.

Just because you are now a muslim, you are still you. There will now be some things that you will start to do that you never did before, and there will be some things that you stop doing that you used to do, but that is all.

Perhaps make them understand that you have everything to win and nothing to lose. You could tell them that if you are right, then living your life as a muslim will earn you a reward inshaAllah. If you are wrong, then you have still enjoyed a good life, and you have lived your life to a very high moral level, what is the objection here?

 

Who to Tell?

 

When I use the word 'family' this is referring to whoever you decide. For myself, I was concerned with telling my parents and my brother about my change of religion. Telling other family members was something that to me was not as urgent, but would be necessary in time. I felt that I wanted to gain the understanding and hopefully the support of my parents prior to tackling anyone else. For others though, they may have other family members that they would want to talk to first. Perhaps an aunt who you feel is open minded and receptive to new ideas, who in fact, may help you talk with your parents. Or perhaps a brother or sister would be easier to tell initially before talking to your parents. This is just something to consider.

 

What Method to use to tell your family?

 

The actual method of telling your family really comes down to the relationship that you have with them. Have you always had a relationship that allows the free and easy discussion of any topic? Or is your relationship good, but discussions of topics that might rock the boat are rare? Or perhaps you feel you have a not so good relationship with them.

 

Face to Face Conversation

 

I would advise the best method is to just sit down and talk to them in an environment that will allow them to express their views freely, ie talk to them privately, somewhere where they and you feel comfortable. This will allow for a conversaton to take place, giving them the opportunity to ask questions and you the opportunity to get across the main points that you feel are important. I know you may feel that you want some of your muslim friends with you, but this may stifle your family's reaction, they may not feel they can ask questions about the religion in front of a muslim audience for example.

A face to face conversation also gives you the opportunity to observe their real reactions and body language, something that will be lost with a telephone call or letter.

 

A Letter

 

If you feel that you are unable to talk to your family face to face then writing a letter is an option to consider. A letter has the advantage of allowing you time to write and re-write until you are happy that you have expressed yourself in the best possible way. You have the opportunity to make sure that you include everything that you want and that the best possible wording is used.

 

The disadvantage is clear, you can niether see nor hear their initial reactions. The reaction that you receive will be a delayed reaction, ie when you next see your family, or when they have read and digested your letter they will phone you. A lot can be learned from witnessing their initial reaction, although some may prefer to only get a reaction once the family have had some time to contemplate what you have told them.

 

You might want to consider telling your family face to face, but afterwards leave them with a letter that you had previously prepared. This would ensure any points that you were not able to convey during the conversation, were not missed altogether.

 

A Phone Call

 

This method does not really apply too well to individuals who still live with their family. Going out of the house to then phone back to the house to tell them, only then to return to the house later, does not seem the best option

For those living apart from their family, this could be considered. However, if the family live relatively close by then I would suggest telling them face to face, rather than down the phone, and only consider the phone in the cases where family live at a distance and visits are few and far between.

Using the phone to tell family still involves having to talk to them, so if possible, going the extra step and telling them face to face would be better. The phone obviously stops you seeing their reaction, it is not always easy to get a true understanding of someone's real feelings down the phone. I feel that a phonecall to talk to your family about such a matter could also trivialise the issue, which is obviously highly important in your life.

However, if this is the method that you feel suits you best, then of course do it this way.

 

When it comes to telling other family members then a phone call or a letter could be the best option and the easiest in some cases.

 

Clearly this is an individual choice and there is no right or wrong. You must go with the option that you feel is best for you. Remember in many cases the reaction from family is very good, and in all cases, whatever the reaction, you will feel a sense of relief from simply telling them.

 

 

What to Say?

 

When you are telling your family take the time to explain to them that you have made a decision in your life, explain that it is an informed decision that you have made for yourself. You can explain some of your reasons for selecting Islam. If appropriate you can thank them for bringing you up in such a way that you have an interest in religion in the first place. You can address any possible concerns that you think they may have. You can reassure them that you are still the same person, and that you will be trying to lead a life of high morals and manners, a life that you hope will make them proud. You might decide to explain a little about how your life will change from now on.

I would suggest not going overboard with your words. Remember the main objective here is to let them know of your decision and to add some words that will help them to accept your decision and inshaAllah be happy for you. It is not the objective to explain all the Islamic teachings and convert them with your words, this can come with time inshaAllah.

 

Whichever method you choose to tell your family this has to be an individual choice of words. You will know the best way to approach the subject with your parents. At the very least you are prepared, you have considered what some of their concerns might be, and you have thought of some possible solutions to these concerns. For example, if they are worried that women are treated badly in Islam, then you can explain the reality to them. So as far as you are able, you are ready to deal with any misgivings they might have.

 

Don't try and 'over prepare'. Don't spend too much time thinking 'what if they say this..', 'what if they say that..'. Don't get too caught up in this beforehand, you will find that once you start talking to them your words will flow naturally with the help of Allah (swt).

 

Remember, there is nothing wrong in not knowing the answer to a question. If your family ask you a question and you do not know the answer, simply aknowledge the question and let them know that you are not totally sure and that you would like to find out for certain and then get back to them. This could actually be an ideal opportunity to enable you to bring up the topic of religion at a future date.

 

How to act during the discussion with your family.

 

As a muslim you will of course be trying to conduct yourself in accordance with Islam. You will be aware of the manners that a muslim must try to show etc, you will be aware of the qualities of patience and understanding. Most importantly you will be aware of the rights of your parents and the way in which you should treat them.

 

Remember that you should not raise your voice to your parents. Just show them love and kindness throughout the discussion. If there are times when a debate starts, as is often the case when discussing religion, remember to speak calmly and softly, and remember to keep smiling

 

Despite your sincerity, you may still feel a little nervous at the start. Your nerves may give an incorrect impression to your family, so try to remain calm and composed, and inshaAllah the strength of your faith will see you through your tough times.

 

Giving your family books

 

You may want to have a couple of books to hand so that if appropriate you can offer them to your family at the end of your discussion. InshaAllah they will be interested to increase their understanding of the path you have chosen.

Obviously, if you fear that they will disrespect the books, then ensure that you do not give them any that contain the Quran.

 

Source: at you are not allowed to post links yetconvertstoislam(contact admin if its a beneficial link)

Edited by hamza81

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Assalamo Alaykom wa Rahmatullahi wa Barakatuh

 

First of all: WELCOME TO Islam :sl: ( two years late to say this, but better late than never, uh? ) :j:

 

I know what you are going through sister, don't worry. Put your trust in Allah and all will be fine insha'Allah. :sl: I would love to talk with you more, because I totally complately understand your situation. I would send you a private message but you haven't posted enough that I could, so I guess I'll just have to wait :no:

 

I love you for the sake of Allah.

 

Wasalaam,

UmMaher

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:sl:

 

Welcome to Islam sister, may Allah Al-Mighty always protect you and guide you to the best of both worlds.

 

Regarding your marriage to a Christian, most scholars would tell you that you must end that marriage and seek a Muslim husband. But one very good scholar, sheikh Yousof Al Qaradawi, has a balanced answer to that problem. He says that a revert woman can keep her marriage on the condition that she doesn't make intimate contacts with her husband, and that she makes every effort possible to try and convince him to revert to Islam. This is better than outright divorce, due to the possibility of succeeding in reverting him, and also to avoid breaking a family and the complications of divorce on children. But to convince him you need to tell him about your reversion.

 

I leave that to your judgment to find the best time to do so. Mind you I'm not a scolar, but I wanted to let you know that divorcing your Christian husband, contrary to what almost everyone will tell you, is not your only option. You can also post this question in our (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetgawaher(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/show.php/showforum/555.html"]short fatwa section[/url], to get you a personal fatwa from a scholar.

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Assalamo Alaykom wa Rahmatullahi wa Barakatuh

 

First of all: WELCOME TO Islam :sl: ( two years late to say this, but better late than never, uh? ) :D

 

I know what you are going through sister, don't worry. Put your trust in Allah and all will be fine insha'Allah. :no: I would love to talk with you more, because I totally complately understand your situation. I would send you a private message but you haven't posted enough that I could, so I guess I'll just have to wait :j:

 

I love you for the sake of Allah.

 

Wasalaam,

UmMaher

 

Thanks. I wonder how many posts I have to have to recieve messages? :D

 

:sl:

 

Welcome to Islam sister, may Allah Al-Mighty always protect you and guide you to the best of both worlds.

 

Regarding your marriage to a Christian, most scholars would tell you that you must end that marriage and seek a Muslim husband. But one very good scholar, sheikh Yousof Al Qaradawi, has a balanced answer to that problem. He says that a revert woman can keep her marriage on the condition that she doesn't make intimate contacts with her husband, and that she makes every effort possible to try and convince him to revert to Islam. This is better than outright divorce, due to the possibility of succeeding in reverting him, and also to avoid breaking a family and the complications of divorce on children. But to convince him you need to tell him about your reversion.

 

I leave that to your judgment to find the best time to do so. Mind you I'm not a scolar, but I wanted to let you know that divorcing your Christian husband, contrary to what almost everyone will tell you, is not your only option. You can also post this question in our short fatwa section, to get you a personal fatwa from a scholar.

 

Thank you.

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salaam alaikum dear sister,

 

I was catholic and reverted to Islam when I was young at uni. Like you, I thought my family would never understand, I just dreaded having to tell them, and I lead the half like that you're in right now. I managed to keep it secret for more than a year, but eventually I told them, and yes at first they were shocked, but eventually they got over it, and accepted me being muslim, and they saw how my life had improved. Since then I'm a bit older now, married, and I have a wonderful daughter. In my opinion my wife who was muslim by birth, had a much more difficult time telling her traditional family that she was interested in marrying a revert from an irish catholic family, lol. Amazingly, mashallah, now many years later, I can tell you that we are all getting along just fine.

 

So my practical advice to you, but first, mashallah!, mahbrook!, I gotta say when I hear stories like yours, it makes me so happy, and I get chills every single time I meet a revert or hear or read a story like yours!!! Alahu Akbar!

 

So, please be patient, put your trust in Allah(SWT) that you will stay on the right and true path, make dua that he helps you with the matter of dropping this on your family and that in time they will understand and accept you for who you are. On learning about Islam, if you absolutely cannot reach or atleast call a masjid, there's good information and study materials that you can find or order online. Just please be cautious of some of these websites, Gawaher is an excellent source for information on Islam and gives you a place to meet and interact with muslims from all over the world.

 

Again be patent learning the prayer, arabic, and so on, especially alone, it will be a daunting task and not to be taken lightly, take it in little steps, start with learning the daily prayers, you're going to make mistakes and get discouraged, I did, but what's most important is that your heart and intentions are in the right place, and that you believe in the oneness of God, keep growing in your faith, and work to please your creator in every aspect of your life. All the rest will fall into place, inshallah.

 

:sl:

Edited by Immaad

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salaam alaikum dear sister,

 

I was catholic and reverted to Islam when I was young at uni. Like you, I thought my family would never understand, I just dreaded having to tell them, and I lead the half like that you're in right now. I managed to keep it secret for more than a year, but eventually I told them, and yes at first they were shocked, but eventually they got over it, and accepted me being muslim, and they saw how my life had improved. Since then I'm a bit older now, married, and I have a wonderful daughter. In my opinion my wife who was muslim by birth, had a much more difficult time telling her traditional family that she was interested in marrying a revert from an irish catholic family, lol. Amazingly, mashallah, now many years later, I can tell you that we are all getting along just fine.

 

So my practical advice to you, but first, mashallah!, mahbrook!, I gotta say when I hear stories like yours, it makes me so happy, and I get chills every single time I meet a revert or hear or read a story like yours!!! Alahu Akbar!

 

So, please be patient, put your trust in Allah(SWT) that you will stay on the right and true path, make dua that he helps you with the matter of dropping this on your family and that in time they will understand and accept you for who you are. On learning about Islam, if you absolutely cannot reach or atleast call a masjid, there's good information and study materials that you can find or order online. Just please be cautious of some of these websites, Gawaher is an excellent source for information on Islam and gives you a place to meet and interact with muslims from all over the world.

 

Again be patent learning the prayer, arabic, and so on, especially alone, it will be a daunting task and not to be taken lightly, take it in little steps, start with learning the daily prayers, you're going to make mistakes and get discouraged, I did, but what's most important is that your heart and intentions are in the right place, and that you believe in the oneness of God, keep growing in your faith, and work to please your creator in every aspect of your life. All the rest will fall into place, inshallah.

 

:sl:

 

That was a lovely post. Thank you!

 

I am most worried about my parents finding out as they are not in good health. They are not quite elderly, but in their middle 60's. My mother is on kidney dialysis, has diabetes, high blood pressure....and slew of other problems. I am most worried about saying something and something happening to her. My father I'm worried he would have a heart attack. He nearly did once when we argued and I didn't speak to him for a week. (because I didn't want to argue, so I just let things cool down) He was at the doctors and put on rest because of the way it affected him. If I did tell them, and something happened, I don't think I could live with myself. :j:

 

I could tell my kids and their father, but I'm worried(actually pretty sure) that he would move away and take them from me because he wouldn't want them in a Muslim home. They are teenagers and could decide for themselves, but I cannot support them yet, so....

 

I did tell a couple more of my friends. They accepted it well, but feel very sorry for me, as they feel now I am not saved anymore and will go to hell when I die. At least I have a couple of more people down. lol The funny thing is that we have a lot of debates on religion now. They think that the more I study Islam and the Bible that I will convert back to Chrisitianity. But what they don't understand is that I was a very devout Christian my entire life, and raised in a very very devout home, and had that way of life. So it's not that I didn't know what was in the Bible.

 

Actually, the contradictions and historical things like the Council of Nicea along with reading the Quran were things that really stood out to me, and changed my views. I was sure my faith was strong enough to study other religions and it not be affected. But what happened is the more I studied, the more I felt Islam is right. That said, I see a lot of extremely translated things that I do not feel are right. But I just stick to the Quran and test things by it. I've learned to pray before studying for God's truth. I honestly feel that by doing that before reading anything, I will not be led astray. I read a lot online, and I think have done pretty good about judging what is acceptable and not. ISA. So that's how I'm handling that. :sl:

 

I am also studying a lot on the internet, Quran, different sites, and forums. I like to look for things that are backed up, not just peoples opinions, so that I can go to the source, pray about it, and get a better feel for things.

 

Thank you all so much for your posts. They really do help. I just have to keep on as some suggested and push forward. I feel things will happen in their own perfect time. I just get a little lonely and frustrated while I'm waiting for that time. I am a patient person. But this is a biggy. Thanks for being there. :no:

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muslimaaah,

 

Maybe prayer... however i mean it in more then one way.

 

prayer and faith in god but also you said your parents were ill. has this solidified your parents definition of god?

 

In the Koran it says that christens and Jews are both people of the book... well why not present it to your parents as such. i did a google search because i could not think of a better way to explain it but they have a lot of books about Islam: from a Christian point of view. and not looking at it in a bad way but showing it in a positive light.

 

 

sorry i cant post the links... but

 

christianbook (dot) com type this number into the search box: WW22334X (NOTE: this book is also on amazon... some people have loved it some have said its not so good... please read customer comments or maybe read the book yourself before giving to your parents... (if you do)

 

Islam: A Guide for Jews and Christians

By: F.E. Peters

 

 

Product Description

The Quran is a sacred book with profound, and familiar, Old and New Testament resonances. And the message it promulgated, Islam, came of age during an extraordinarily rich era of interaction among monotheists. Jews, Christians, and Muslims not only worshipped the same God, but shared aspirations, operated in the same social and economic environment, and sometimes lived side by side, indistinguishable by language, costume, or manners. Today, of course, little of this commonality is apparent, and Islam is poorly understood by most non-Muslims. Entering Islam through the same biblical door Muhammad did, this book introduces readers with Christian or Jewish backgrounds to one of the world's largest, most active, and - in the West - least understood religions.

 

 

AMAZON (dot) com this one also has some customer reviews from muslims that are nice... be sure to read the customer reports first! the book got a 4 1/2 star rating by readers... sorry you will have to type book name in amazon search box...

 

 

Meeting Islam: A Guide For Christians

by George Dardess

 

 

Dardess, a deacon in the Roman Catholic Church and an English professor, describes in this brief book his own study of Islam, which began in 1992 and has included learning Arabic so he could understand the religion better. Although he remains steadfast in his own Catholic beliefs, he applies Islamic teachings to understand both Islam and his own religion better. He has a philosophical view of Islam, sometimes leading to dense descriptions, sometimes producing profound insights. Dardess poignantly recognizes the Islamic belief that all people are meant to be thankful and devoted to God and are born wanting to be good. He understands the Qur'an as a practitioner of the faith would, having studied it in the original language with Muslim teachers at his local Islamic center. He writes: "The Qur'an is so deeply imbued with moral challenge that it's impossible not to turn every remembered phrase in it into a mirror on one's conscience." This brief book provides some introductory information about Islam and is excellent reading for Christians who are curious about one of the world's fastest-growing religions. Dardess is both deeply religious and open-minded, a pleasant and surprising combination.

 

 

one customer review

I felt that Mr. Dardess gave a true and acurate portrayal of what the religion is about. This is a book that anyone can read and get an acurate understanding of the religion. As a Muslim I felt for the first time, a non-Muslim truely understands what Islam is all about. What a pleasure to read. What a great book and what a great writer.

 

 

I can not say which of these are good i have not read them. I hope i have helped a little there are many many books out there. perhaps since you have not had the oportunity to study as much a book highlighting how wonderful the relgion is would be more informative...

 

i mean no offence just trying to say that maybe it would smooth things over if they had a lot of facts at their fingertips. instead of you having to look things up or try and recall...

 

i am learning too.

 

anyway i hope this helps...

 

best wishes,

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Assallamalaikum. Most touching posts on this thread. May Allah bless you and guide you and help you deal with your parents, husband and children!

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