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Verbs Ending In æä ?

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In my Arabic class, I'm asked to "write ten sentences describing what my friends and family members do/not do, and how much, often, or well they do it, by using the following verbs and a variety of adverbs." Some of the verbs are: íÚãáæä, íÞÑÇæä and íÃÑÓæä.

 

Also, there are two verbs that are very similar in the list. One is íÃÑÓæä and another is íÃÑÓ. What's the difference?

 

Thanks :sl:

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PropellerAds

Hello respected Check :sl:

 

 

Well , we use íÃÑÓæä for plural and íÃÑÓ for singular for example :

 

1- íÃÑõÓ ÎÇáà ÇáÃÑÓ

 

ÇáØáÇÈ íÃÑÓæä ÇáÃÑÓ2

 

I don't know if you could read these sentences :sl:

 

Tell me if you couldn't understand them , i will translate it into English ..

 

I wish you good luck with Arabic language ..

 

 

Peace .

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Thanks for the quick response. :sl:

 

I would say #1 is "Khalid studies the homework."

 

And #2 is "The students studied the homework."

 

And while I'm at, a very brief explanation of the idaafa would be appreciated. I'm supposed to be saying whether the phrase is an example of idaafa or noun + describer. I've gotten "a tall man" and "New York weather" as noun + describer while I have "gorfa al-saf" as idaafa. I'm thinking because the last phrase has one definite word and one indefinite word, this actually says "The room is a class." Am I right in my thinking? :sl:

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You're welcome .

 

Good , the translation of the examples were correct :sl:

 

The Arabic language isn't like the English language so we can't translate from English into Arabic letter by letter ..

 

" Gorfat Al-saf " is not : The room is a class .

 

" Gorfat Al-saf " means : The room of the class .

 

Could you please explain what do you mean by Idaafa ÅÖÇÃÉ noun + describer ? i didn't get it .

 

Peace .

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I see where I went wrong. A phrase farther down read "autobeese al-medresa." Unless that was a really big bus, saying "The bus is a school" won't work. I see what you mean; this particular phrase would be "bus of the school", or "school bus."

 

Let me see if I have this right: If the first word is definite and the second is not, then we have a complete sentence. If the first word is not definite but the second is, we have word one "of" word two. If neither are definite, then we have "a blank blank" and if both are definite we have "the blank blank." I hope you see what I mean by that. I don't know how to word it exactly.

 

This homework assignment wants to us to read ten phrases and tell if it is an example of iDaafa or an example of a simple noun with an adjective.

 

Phrases:

a tall man

room of the class

New York weather

of Syrian decent

the high humidity

the Arabic language

bus of the school

 

and a few more.

 

I see in your response that you said "gorfat al-saf" means "the room of the class." How can we be sure of the first "the"? Could it also be "a room of the class"?

 

Also, I know because you said "gorfat" instead of "gorfa" that it is indeed an example of iDaafa as I said in previous post I thought it was. Yet I'm not 100% sure why I thought that.

 

:sl:

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:sl: Don't confuse yourself .

 

I see what you mean; this particular phrase would be "bus of the school", or "school bus."

 

Yeah , correct .

 

If the first word is not definite but the second is, we have word one "of" word two. If neither are definite, then we have "a blank blank" and if both are definite we have "the blank blank." I hope you see what I mean by that. I don't know how to word it exactly.

 

Completely correct . If we have definite words we use " The " in Arabic " Çá " for example :

 

1- ÇáãÃÑÓÉ ÌãíáÉ which means : The school is beautiful .

 

But , if we have words indefinite we use " A " for example :

 

1- ãÃÑÓÉ ÌãíáÉ which mean : Beautiful school ..

 

 

This homework assignment wants to us to read ten phrases and tell if it is an example of iDaafa or an example of a simple noun with an adjective.

 

Phrases:

a tall man

room of the class

New York weather

of Syrian decent

the high humidity

the Arabic language

bus of the school

 

A tall man : is an example of a noun with an adjective.

 

Room of the class : is an example of iDaafa

 

New York weather : i don't know to be honest ( I'm sorry ) but i think it could be Idaafa ÅÖÇÃÉ or a noun with a describe . because if it's New york weather is cold , then we should say : it's an example of a noun with an adjective .

 

Of Syrian decent : ?? i didn't get it .

 

The high humidity : is a noun with an adjective .

 

The Arabic language : is an example of Idaafa .

 

Bus of the school : is an example of Idaafa

 

 

 

I see in your response that you said "gorfat al-saf" means "the room of the class." How can we be sure of the first "the"? Could it also be "a room of the class"?

 

Yes , it could be . We can say " The class room " or a room of the class " or even " The room of the class " according to the situation .

 

Also, I know because you said "gorfat" instead of "gorfa" that it is indeed an example of iDaafa as I said in previous post I thought it was. Yet I'm not 100% sure why I thought that.

 

" Gorfa " is n't correct . We should add " T " Gorfat Al-saf ..

 

I hope this helps you :sl:

 

Please check my answers before you say it in your Arabic class , I'm not 100 % sure ..

 

 

Peace ..

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I thank you again. Slowly but surely I'm getting this :sl:

 

I have another small question. I know that "kitaabuha" is "her book." How do I say "her books"? Similarly, "kitaabee" is "my book". What is "my books"?

 

I know that the plural of book is "kutub." Do I simply say "her books" as "kutubuha" and "my books" as "kutubee"?

 

Also, one more thing that I just thought of. The word for "the answering" is "ÇáÇÌÇÈÉ Úä". That means that simply "answering" is "ÇÌÇÈÉ", right? And what is the "Úä" for in "the answering"? I'm assuming it's a preposition of some sorts.

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I know that the plural of book is "kutub." Do I simply say "her books" as "kutubuha" and "my books" as "kutubee"?

 

That is correct

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So, we attach "æä" at this end of a verb if the noun it is modifying is plural. Does the gender of the noun matter with regards to the "æä" verb ending?

 

Also, do we attach "æä" at the end of adjectives of the noun it's modifying is plural? And if so, does the gender of the noun matter?

 

I've almost got a grip on all of this basic grammar stuff. I'm not looking forward to memorizing all nine or so forms. But I'll do it!

 

:sl:

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So, we attach "æä" at this end of a verb if the noun it is modifying is plural. Does the gender of the noun matter with regards to the "æä" verb ending?

 

Also, do we attach "æä" at the end of adjectives of the noun it's modifying is plural? And if so, does the gender of the noun matter?

 

I've almost got a grip on all of this basic grammar stuff. I'm not looking forward to memorizing all nine or so forms. But I'll do it!

 

:sl:

 

æä[using large font size is not allowed] is for present future tense verbs that are masculine plural. Also for nouns that are sound masculine plural in the state of rafa. e.g. Muslim = single, Muslimoon = plural

Note that not all nouns are sound plurals e.g. kitab = book, kutub = books. You cant say kitaboon

 

I just googled this for you. I skimmed over it and looks useful: (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetlearnarabiconline(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/verb-conjugation.shtml"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetlearnarabiconline(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/verb-conjugation.shtml[/url]

 

There is a book with audio called "The fundamentals of classical arabic" It presents the verb tables well and assists in memorising them. Its not that bad. Print it off and sit down repeating the table and you will memorise it in 1/2 hour. Once you have memorised the past tense and P/F tense charts everything else in Arabic will be slightly easier. You will realise that the 10 verb forms are basically the same.

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I printed that off about a week ago and have studied it -decently- since then. Lots of information presented! But half an hour to memorize all those charts? That's crazy talk :sl: But I'm learning, I'm learning.

 

Another quick question: Let's say I want to say, "The beautiful buildings." I know the noun comes before the adjective in Arabic, which is unlike English. So it'd be written "The buildings beautiful." In Arabic, is this ÇáÈäÇíÇÊ ÇáÌãíáÉ ? Transliterated as "al-binaya al-jameela." Both are definite because I'm saying "the blank blank" and I made my adjective feminine because my thing being described is feminine. My question is, because the thing being described is plural, does that change my adjective?

 

I think I understand the concept if I were to say "The buildings are beautiful." I would say "al-binaya" still, and then the feminine plural present of "to be beautiful."

 

If that isn't correct, then I would still say "al-binaya", and then add the feminine plural present of "to be", followed by "jameela" (or whatever that adjective might be, as I'm still not certain it is jameela).

 

If we could for a moment go back to your first post here. I thought I understood it but now I'm having doubts. I got the sentence right, but if I had been asked to supply the Arabic from the English, I'd have done it differently. One question I have is why you put "He studies Khalid homework" instead of "Khalid he studies homework." The second sentence you wrote makes more sense to me: it is "The students they study homework."

 

Well now I've talked myself into another question. In the link you gave me, it says in one of the conjugation tables that "they masculine plural helped" is "nasarooa." Yet you wrote "they plural studied" is "yadrusoon." Even if all the students in question were female, it still doesn't follow that same pattern presented in the link.

 

May I ask, in that first post of your's with the sentences, how the second one is present tense and not past tense? I understand that the first is past.

 

I thank anyone who takes the time to read that. I'm tempted to print that off and have my Arabic professor go over it with me, as it'll be easy to communicate when we're in physical contact. It seems one question leads to another, leads to another, ect.

 

:sl:

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Hi Check,

 

It is heaps easier to speak with a living teacher. Also would be easier if we started from the beginning and progressed in an orderly manner. Anyway hope this clears up some confusion:

 

A nominal sentence consists of a subject and predicate

The subject and predicate must agree with

Gender, Number and end case (e.g. domma)

 

A describing construction is not a sentence. The adjective follows the object without any words in between.

The object and adjective must agree with

Gender, Number, end case (e.g. domma) and definiteness (e.g. Al + no tanwin)

 

Regarding verbal sentence.

The most common way to structure a verbal sentence (classically) is: Verb + Doer + Direct object but it makes sense in other orders though their is a subtle change in meaning e.g. Verb + direct object + doer

Edited by Aussie

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