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Egypt Conflict-what People Should Remember!

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A Muslim does not fight and is ready to die so someone can have a job in this world, we only fight in the name of Allah not of a country that doesn’t exist.

 

People should not be led astray by people who say they are doing the right thing, for example;-

 

1. There is no Islamic law to punish and go against someone if they don’t give you a job!

2. There is no Islamic law to punish and go against someone if they don’t give the poor their due!

 

All of the above Allah punishes himself, whether in this world or the next, or both, or only the next.

 

People are listening to the West and only care about their life and comforts of this world. So they only seek to revolt against their leaders if they don’t have jobs, etc-but this is incorrect in Islam. We only go against people if they are calling themselves Muslims, but clearly leading people astray. I do not support the movement AS people are not going against Hosni Mubarak for not leading people correctly ie how many times does he tell people to worship the one God, remember the Day of Judgement, Paradise and Hell? It is the job of every leader to do this-even Allah said that Pharaoh was wrong for leading his people astray-Allah did NOT to Prophet Moses peace be upon him that you need to get rid of Pharaoh and then take the advantage and get what you want from the people-no the message is for all.

 

So people in Egypt are not going against Hosni Mubarak because he is not being a good Muslim (closing borders to the Palestinians etc) but because he is not giving them what they want for the life of this world. There are of course Muslims who dislike Hosni Mubarak for being evil-but as a Muslim we accept that people are being tested and people are choosing their side ie what do they want the life of the next world or the this one? It is not a Muslim’s job to take over a nation with a majority of people who want the life of this world and give them what they want. There are a lot of people quoting Muslim state-I urge people to read the story of the companions and how they lived, the emphasis was to talk and tell people to save themselves from the fires of Hell and pay the poor due-you don’t build a Muslim state first and then get people to accept Islamic laws before they accept Islam. There is no basis in their approach as there is no compulsion in Islam. So why didn’t they fight against the corrupted 30 years ago???

 

People did not stand by Prophet Jesus peace be upon him and let him be crucified (but he did not die), there were those that refused to fight and asked Prophet Moses peace be upon him and God to fight for them-and then they were astray, and so Allah is not going to help people who refuse to stand for Islam. People could argue that the reasons why Islam is successful is because we listened and stood by Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him. We do not make any distinctions between the Prophets as stated in the Quran, but we talk of Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him as we have benefited from his teachings.

 

Allah has said there are those that say they believe in Allah and the last day but they believe not. Now if I was to say to an Egyptian;-

 

The UK for example after all the time they received and natural disasters they have witnessed and Islam they are rejecting are saying they want to recover and build a prosperous nation-would an Egyptian find this acceptable??? They are not continuing and neither is “Egyptâ€. The people of Aad and Thamud were destroyed and so will these countries that you see today, the reason why they don’t know what to do, as there isn’t anything else to do! Typical evil only repeat themselves playing politics-but look it no longer fits -and they are trying to wrap their heads around what to do-but they cannot interfere with Allah providing a fair test to the people of Egypt. Allah be praised!

If I was living in Egypt, they are aware that there was a war on so called terror, natural disasters, and they dare to talk about living in this world?? Muslims are content and grateful to what they have, and obviously they have got by so far-how many of them are dying of starvation?? Even still they will see on the Day of Judgement that they were in error complaining about not having much in this world when it is an huge opportunity to earn so much by being content to Allah, and earning so much in the next world.

 

In Islam we remain Muslims even when;-

 

-we are poor,

-we are suffering through so much,

-even in the month of Ramadan, people are showing to Allah that they are being obedient to Allah and remaining Muslims without food as what is dear to have Allah pleased with them. Allah has made reference to people who when their ship was in a storm, they prayed to Allah to be saved, but when they were and came to shore, they thought not of Allah.

 

 

There are people praying after their Friday prayers and then looking for the life of this world!

 

Egyptians should think about what for example all those Egyptians died the last few days are thinking of their cause-those Egyptians who have died;-

 

1. Don’t care about Egypt,

2. See how terrible it is after all that has happened in this world, people think less of the Day of Judgement, after all the natural disasters.

3. If you died you would only say it is acceptable if a person is going against someone in this world for being evil. Not to go against someone because you couldn’t live here how you want to live. Ie no dead person would accept the reasons for the battle of Badr, but no dead Egyptian would accept there cause as a good one.

 

 

 

Considering were we are in this world, I think its good for them to have their wake up call, Allah allows evil people to do what they want in this world and then they see that their wealth and their children will not save them from the fires of Hell. For the people who are protesting for the life of this world, it is good that Allah has allowed them to confront frankly their own desires in this world and they will come to know that there is NO future for Egypt, it is of cause a farce that the US says they are going to build a prosperous nation-when they accept homosexuality, reject Islam, it like people saying when they reject Prophet Noah peace be upon him, we reject your message we are going to live here for the life of this world-frankly that is preposterous. Even the people at the time of Prophet Lut peace be upon him were destroyed. You don’t just reject Islam and then say that things will be the same. Obviously Egypt needed a wake up call, at least in Ireland they are already saying it wouldn’t make a difference who was in charge as it will not improve Ireland in the foreseeable future, etc. At least people are getting and are saying that life is not better for the children -a reversible when it used to be that parents thought that things would get better for them.

 

Allah does NOT care about Egypt, frankly he is keeping you alive, to give you time to make the best choices for you in this world as it is your only opportunity to make it to Paradise! Which is were you worship Allah, remember the Day of Judgement and in Paradise and Hell. Which is obviously what the Egyptians need to do, and not look for the life of this world. It is not about copying and want what others have in this world-it has already been mentioned not to look at what others have in this world. We live here, pay our bills etc, but we don’t focus on what we get in this world but look towards the next-which if they even read about the time of the Prophet Muhammad peace be upon him, people can see how far they have changed their agendas on what they want. They talk as like the west-saying to others you wouldn’t ask us to give up on finding food etc, as you have food-we are not asking people not to work, and work for food-but we are content and grateful for whatsoever Allah has provided us with, but we are not going to go further, ie if you had cucumbers, but you couldn’t afford tomatoes-then you cannot complain! You always have to be grateful for what Allah has provided.

Remember Allah and the Day of Judgement much and do NOT be led astray by people who claim to stand for good, when they only look for this life of this world. We Muslim do not fight for people who want the life of this world, our causes are not the same. Do not get involved, let people see for themselves that Egypt will not get better and they better be strong and steadfast in Islam as things are only going to get worse when people go through the Major signs of the Day of Judgement! So this is an opportunity to pray to Allah and worship him in peace and do NOT get involved with this, as only join the Mahdi and the Prophet Jesus peace be upon him when he arrives back-so at least you know that you are rightly guided and not follow people who care for the life of this world (even other countries such as when the in Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia-why did not the leaders say we will be one nation united if they are so serious about Muslim Ummah?? There is not going to be an Islamic state see the “Major signs of the Day of Judgement†thread. Guard yourselves from those that lead other people astray. I will leave this thread for people to guard themselves from a day were no doubt they would not want to be associated with people who look for the life of this world.

 

This is a follow up from “Collapse of these countriesâ€, “Major signs of the Day of Judgementâ€, “Not our Goalâ€, “Murder†threads.

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I think the issue is in Egypt is more just about poverty, or people not having a job. For years people have been tortured for simply speaking out against their president's policies, or based on terrorism charges which were not tried in court. Poverty exists in every nation, but if their leader does not even listen to them and oppresses anyone with opposing or dissenting views, protests against him are unsurprising.

 

To say it is a western concept to protest for just the wants of this world, I say is a misconception. Protests have occurred all over the world, covering over a variety of reasons.

 

I'll quote some articles from Muslimmatters website, which I find best addresses the situation in Egypt and in other countries in the region.

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Ali Shehata | Reflections on the Protests in Egypt

 

The Need for Understanding and Tolerance

 

Reading the highly charged words exchanged between Muslims in the past two weeks over the issue of Tunisia, and now Egypt, I felt sad to see a number of people taking very extreme stances and forgetting the middle path of Islam that we have been guided to by Allah.

 

Thus We have appointed you a middle nation, that you may be witnesses against mankind, and that the Messenger may be a witness against you. [2:143]

 

There is no doubt that this is an issue that has presented many challenging questions, and that we should all be reminded that when clarity is not present that it is better for us to remain silent and protect ourselves from the evil of both harming others with our words, and worse, speaking about Allah without knowledge. May Allah protect us all from these evils and imbue our words with wisdom.

 

I myself spent a great deal of time both reflecting on the events as they unfolded, as well as reviewing the various stances of our noble scholars on matters of this nature. Initially, despite my excitement and du’a for the safety and success of the people of Tunis, I was nonetheless very concerned by the number of people who turned away from Allah and instead to major sins like self-immolation to solve their problems.

 

Yet there is no doubt that there is an indescribable degree of desperation that has taken hold of so many people in these countries, a desperation that may very well have led to outright madness in many of our brothers and sisters. Hence, it is my sincere du’a that Allah, the All-Merciful and All-Forgiving, will overlook their actions done in these dire moments and that He reward them with success against their oppressors and with His pleasure and Mercy – ameen.

 

On the matter of suicide, let us briefly take the time to remember this important hadith from Sahih Muslim. When the Prophet (saas) made hijrah to Madinah, Tufayl ibn ‘Amr came as well, along with a man from his tribe. This man became ill when he first reached Madinah and his illness became so severe that he took a knife and slit his wrist, and the blood spilled out until he died. Tufayl then saw him in a dream, in a good vision, except that his hands were wrapped up.

 

So he asked him, ‘What has your Lord done with you?’

 

He replied, ‘He has forgiven me because of my hijrah to His Prophet (saas).’ The he asked, ‘Why are your hands wrapped up?’.

 

He said, ‘It was said to me: We shall not fix something you have corrupted yourself!’

 

So Tufayl relayed this to the Messenger of Allah (saas), so he said: ‘O Allah! And forgive his hands (too)!’

 

From this hadith we understand that suicide does not expel a person from Islam, but rather it is a major sin that can lead to punishment in the Hereafter.

 

Al-Qaadi ‘Iyadh said in Ikmaal al-Mu’lim:

 

“In this hadith is proof for Ahlus-Sunnah for what they say, that Allah may forgive the sins of whomever He wants, and it explains the ahadith before it that might seem to give the false impression that someone who commits suicide faces the eternal threat of remaining (in the Fire) forever.”

 

Yet as the events continued to unfold, I witnessed the images of people being sprayed with water cannons while in sujud, the commitment of the overwhelming majority of the people to keep the protests free of the use of weapons and killing and the selfless acts of the brave and courageous Egyptian youth who set up neighborhood watches to protect their neighbors’ homes and shops. It was then that I realized the goodness of this effort and that the people had continued to remain close to Allah in these difficult days. This point was also mentioned by Shaykh Muhammad Hassan in Egypt, who called the efforts of the people, particularly the youth, “a blessed and good act.”

 

I then decided to write this article to demonstrate the expansiveness of Islam on the issues relevant to these events because I noticed that the people had turned away from Islam and from the scholars. There is the idea that some people have mistakenly spread, that these events are against Islam – and whereas this may be in fact the opinion of some scholars, it is by far not the only opinion on this issue. To illustrate this point, in having this article reviewed before publication, I had three PhD’s in Islamic Studies as well as a holder of a Master’s degree comment to me on it and I received four completely different opinions subhan’Allah. So let us not by hasty in declaring the issue to be black and white, and let us move past this question to tackle the real issues at hand of how to make an impact.

 

Scholars and the Knowledge of the Condition

 

The scholars of Egypt have been divided in their opinions on this matter as it is a very controversial one. There are some who have praised it, others who have been silent and those who have recommended that people not participate in it. Yet, the scholars of Egypt are best aware of the circumstances on their streets and the scholars outside of Egypt have refrained to speak much on the matter since this case is particular to every nation in its own way depending upon several factors.

 

This reminds us of an important principle in fiqh, that there are some rulings which are universal for time, place and condition; and there are other rulings which will vary to some extent based upon certain factors or circumstances. Ibn al-Qayyim, in his book ‘Ilaam al-Muwaqiyeen, has written that the one who gives fatwa must first have specific practical knowledge of the issue that he is speaking about, and secondly have the religious knowledge of the fiqh of that matter before he issues a ruling.

 

Many times, people have asked specific questions on this website, at times even demanded answers from the people of knowledge in the West regarding certain matters in the East. Yet, this guiding principle has caused many to rightly remain silent and leave certain matters to the people who know them best, those who are living them and seeing the reality with their own eyes and can thus judge them the best.

 

Understanding Khurooj Against the Ruler

 

The concept of khurooj against the leader has been understood by various scholars in different ways, but generally it refers to taking up arms against the ruler in order to forcibly remove him from power. Speaking out against the leader has also been considered by some to also be a form of prohibited khurooj. As Muslims, we must understand that this is a very detailed and elaborate matter and beyond the scope of this simple article to explore in its fullness. I only wish to provide a foundation for those who are unfamiliar with it here. With that in mind, let us now briefly consider the evidences for this important principle.

 

Allah has said in the Quran what means,

 

“O you who believe! Obey Allah and obey the Messenger, and those who are in authority over you. If you differ in anything among yourselves, refer it to Allah and His Messenger, if you believe in Allah and in the Last Day.” [4:59]

 

And the Prophet (saas) also stated,

 

“The best of your leaders are those whom you love and who love you, who pray for you and you pray for them. The worst of your leaders are those whom you hate and who hate you, and you send curses on them and they send curses on you.” He was asked, ““O Messenger of Allah (saas) should we not fight them by the sword?” He said, “Not as long as they are establishing prayer amongst you. And if you see from those in authority over you something that you hate then hate his action and do not remove your hand from obedience” (Muslim)

 

Imam an-Nawawi said in his commentary on Sahih Muslim:

 

And as for rebelling against the rulers and fighting them, then it is prohibited by unanimous agreement (ijmā’) of the Muslims, even if they are sinful oppressors. And the ahadith are many with the meaning that I have mentioned. And Ahlus-Sunnah are united that the ruler is not to be removed on account of his sinfulness … And the scholars have said, that the reason for prohibiting his removal (by these means) and the forbidding of revolting against him is due to what accompanies such acts from that of tribulations, shedding of blood, and corruption. Hence, the harm from his removal is greater than from him remaining in place.

 

From Imam an-Nawawi’s explanation we derive an important point that has been used by some scholars, and that is the prohibition of fighting the Imam stems from the great chaos that accompanies it and most often outweighs the evil of the ruler himself. Those scholars today who have been opposed to the protests racing across the Muslim world have not been opposed to them because they love the tyrants in those countries or because they are pleased with their oppressive and dictatorial policies. No. They are opposed to them because they are afraid of the harm that may come from them when things get out of control. Unfortunately, most of the revolutions in our history have not had positive results and this is something we must keep in mind.

 

Controversy as Regards the Extent of Obeying the Ruler

 

The fact that Muslims must listen to and obey their rulers is not a matter of disagreement in Islam, but to what extent they do so, and when do they abandon this obedience is an area of varying opinion among the scholars. The obedience to the ruler is always contingent upon the command of the ruler not being in defiance to Allah and His Messenger (saas) as has been established by a number of ahadith:

 

“The Muslim is required to hear and obey in that which he likes and dislikes, unless he was commanded to sin. When he is commanded with sin, then there is no hearing or obeying.” (Bukhari and Muslim)

 

and

 

“… Obedience is only in righteousness.” (Bukhari and Muslim)

 

Yet, do the Muslims continue to obey when the ruler judges by other than Islam? This specific matter is something relatively new in our time (ruling by other than Shari’ah) and was not experienced by the earliest generations. It is authentically narrated from the Prophet (saas) that he said,

 

“Even if a slave was appointed over you, and he rules you with Allah’s Book, then listen to him and obey him.” (Muslim)

 

This same stream of thought is found in the noble words of Abu Bakr when he said upon assuming the khilafah,

 

O people! I have been put in charge over you, but I am not the best of you. If I act well, then help me, and if I act badly, then put me right. Truthfulness is a trust and lying is treachery … Obey me as long as I obey Allah and His Messenger. If I disobey Allah and His Messenger, you owe me no obedience. (Sirat Ibn Hisham)

 

Do these above ahadith specifically give Muslims the permission to revolt? Upon this, the scholars have differed. Some argue that non-compliance with the leader’s command is not equal to rebelling against him, and others say that when they violate their agreement with their people – the agreement to rule them by the Book of Allah – that the people owe them no allegiance and can act to replace them.

 

Acting to Replace a Tyrannical Ruler

 

Allah states in the Quran what means,

 

“And cooperate with one another in righteousness and obedience to Allah, and do not cooperate with one another in sin and transgression, and obey Allah.” [5:2]

 

In the very important hadith of Umm Salamah (ra), the Messenger of Allah (saas) said:

 

“You shall have leaders over you, some of their actions you will accept and other things you will reject; whoever rejects with his tongue will be safe from sin, and whoever hates with his heart he will at least have escaped blame, but whoever follows and accepts (he shall be guilty)!” It was said, “Should we not fight them?” The Messenger of Allah (saas) said, “No, as long as they pray.” (Abu Dawud)

 

This hadith of Umm Salamah has other ahadith which support its meaning. For example, the Prophet (saas) also said,

 

“Whoever from amongst you sees an evil should change it by his hand, if he is unable to do so then he should change it by his tongue (by speaking against it), and if he is unable to do so then he should reject it in his heart – and this is the weakest of Iman.” (Muslim)

 

He (saas) also said,

 

“The best Jihad is the word of Justice in front of the oppressive Sultan.” (Abu Dawud, Tirmidhi, ibn Majah)

 

And the Prophet (saas) also said,

 

“If the people witness an oppressor and they do not take him by his hands (to prevent him) then they are close to Allah covering them all with punishment.” (Abu Dawud, Tirmidhi, ibn Majah)

 

These very important ahadith on this issue provide some options in the Islamic approach towards rulers who transgress. The greater action, which is among the highest forms of Jihad, is to reject with the tongue by speaking out against their crimes and thus be safe from sin. Yet, there are conditions in which speaking out or acting may bring greater harm to both the person and the society and in these cases one must be patient and refrain from speech as it is the lesser of the two evils. In this case, he hates in his heart, and he will still have escaped blame.

 

The case for being patient and hating in the heart was evidenced by one of the statements of the great tabi’ee al-Hasan al-Basri. A group of Muslims came to him seeking a ruling for rebelling against al-Hajjaj. So they said: “O Abaa Sa’eed! What do you say about fighting this oppressor who has unlawfully spilt the blood, and unlawfully taken wealth, and did this, and did that?” So al-Hasan said:

 

“I say not to fight him. If this is a punishment from Allah, then you will not be able to remove it with your swords. If this is a trial from Allah, then be patient until Allah’s Judgment comes, and He is the Best of Judges.” (Tabaqat ibn Sa’d)

 

Here al-Hasan recognized the relative impotence of the people before the strength and ruthlessness of al-Hajjaj and thus he recommended patience. Notice that he did not tell them that this act was forbidden, only that he advised them against it for practical reasons. Had the people been greater in number or greater in strength, then the situation may well have been different.

 

Furthermore, Ibn Hajar records in his commentary to Sahih al-Bukhari:

 

Imam Nawawi said: “…one should not object to the actions of the rulers unless they carry out clear and open transgression, and that which is contrary to the general principles of Islam.”

 

Ibn Teen narrates from al-Dawudi: ‘The scholars have stated that if one is able to remove a transgressing ruler, without causing any Fitnah and oppression, then he should be removed, otherwise it is necessary to be patient.”

 

The real question that remains then, a question that can only be assessed by each population in its own land, “will our efforts to remove this tyrant create a greater fitnah and oppression than that which he has exacted upon us?”

 

Thus, if a leader or ruler becomes corrupt he should first be advised, in private if possible, or in public if his evil deeds were done in public. [This unfortunately is an act which is limited to a select group of people in our time and is not a practical point for the majority of the Ummah.] If he does not turn away from his evil deeds, he should be overthrown or removed from position if this can be done without creating further upheaval in the society. However, in the process of removing him from position, he should not be physically fought, such as waging war with weapons. And Allah knows best.

 

The Position of Some Contemporary Scholars Who Uphold the Legality of Protests

 

Shaykh Salman al-‘Awdah in Saudi Arabia has previously expressed that he sees no harm in gathering for protests so long as they remain for the most part peaceful and civil. He states that the foundation of matters such as this (peaceful protests) is that it is permissible and doesn’t require any specific evidence to support it. It suffices us that there is no evidence that forbids this type of action unless it is accompanied by obvious harm or sin.

 

In this valuable statement, we understand that some scholars see protests as a worldly act and not a religious one. Among the principles of Islam is that all religious actions are by default forbidden and can only be done when one has a clear evidence from the Quran or Sunnah. On the other hand, worldly actions are by default permissible and can only be forbidden by clear evidence against them from Quran or Sunnah. Some other scholars disagree and see protests as a religious action wherein Muslims aim to command good and forbid evil and thus say that an evidence is required (despite the fact that the gathering is simply a means and not a religious act itself). Again, a matter of controversy.

 

This same position voiced by Sh. Salman has also been taken by Shaykh AbdulRahman Abd al-Khaliq who used a similar reasoning, and added that the concept of Muslims going out in large numbers to demonstrate their strength is well established in Islam by such things as the Jumu’ah prayer, the two Eid prayers and so forth.

 

Shaykh Yusuf al-Qaradawi has also supported these protests and supported the removal of Mubarak from his office as can be read elsewhere on this website. And from within Egypt, Shaykh Muhammad Hassan as already alluded to has voiced support for the act of the youth and said in a televised statement, “I am not blaming you for what you have done.” And he also emphasized the peaceful nature of this protest that calls for the rights of the people and for goodness in praising it.

 

Concluding Remarks

 

From these various ahadith and statements of our scholars across the width of Islamic history, we can find evidence to support the protests in the Muslim nations today. They have gathered together to reject with their tongues the evils in their respective governments after having been patient for many years and restraining themselves. They have furthermore kept their efforts relatively peaceful and free from much harm and they have avoided the greater harm, and potential sin, of raising weapons against their leaders. As an Egyptian myself who knows what many of these people have experienced of fear, oppressive policies, illegal detainments, police brutality and so forth; I believe that their efforts thus far have been the lesser evil – and Allah knows best.

 

It is also important for us to remember that these protests are far from reaching any real gains. Yes, the people have thrown aside the shackles of fear, but what awaits them tomorrow and the next day? For those who equated Mubarak with Pharaoh, then the appointment of Omar Sulaiman as the next leader is equivalent to Pharaoh taking Haman as his confidant. Sulaiman, in his role as head of the murky Egyptian Intelligence, has been the supervisor of numerous evils not limited to the torture of the citizenry (including the scholars), the illegal rendition programs, and of course a key player in walling off the people of Gaza. To have him take over the helm in Egypt is a nightmare that I ask Allah to protect all the Muslims from.

 

Will there be those among the scholars and thinkers that disagree with the actions of the Tunisians, Egyptians and those who follow this path? There is no doubt that such disagreement has already occurred, as it is very controversial and always has been. But as Muslims we must live in the real world and recognize that there will be differences of opinion on such controversial issues. The reality at hand is that these protests have already begun and we need to do more for our brothers and sisters in these lands than argue the legitimacy of their efforts. They have begun and they have a valid Islamic case for their actions, alhamdulillah.

 

My humble recommendation to readers is that they spend their efforts wisely in helping these noble causes by turning to Allah. Gathering to show support in our own cities is wonderful and gives us a sense of unity, alhamdulillah, but what is needed now more than anything is calling upon Allah to accept these efforts and overlook whatever wrong may be in them. To show our sincerity in our love to them by waking up in the night to cry out to Allah to aid them and make their feet firm, and to bring about good from their efforts and rid them of the tyrants. Ameen!

 

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Yasir Qadhi | A Brief Statement Regarding the Situation in Egypt

 

The recent events in Egypt have left us all completely and totally astounded. The mass protests, organized via impromptu SMS texts and Facebook messages, has shown the world that there is still life and honor in Muslim lands!

 

And amidst all of this clamor abroad, Muslims here in America are asking others, especially their scholars and clerics, what they should be doing. And it is here where the situation becomes more complicated. Some people try to quote traditions that seem to prohibit fighting against the rulers, as if suggesting that the people of Egypt (and Tunisia) have done some type of wrong and incurred sin upon themselves by protesting their conditions. Others, lost in the exuberance of the moment, seem so sure of positive change and so obsessed with getting rid of the current evil, that they do not think two steps ahead, and do not plan for the possibility of failure.

 

Sometimes, no response from a scholar is in fact the best and safest response. This is especially true when a scholar is sitting thousands of miles away, comfortably in his own chair, pretending to know better than the people of that land. It is because of this that I cannot comment on specifics, and shall restrain myself to generalities. I leave it to the scholars of Egypt to instruct their own people what in particular they should be doing.

 

But for those here in America, who dare criticize the Egyptian masses based upon their own understandings of a set of hadith, I say to them, “Hold your tongues! You are not living in their situation. You have not experienced years and decades of economic, social and political repression. You have no right to pass verdicts on the situation of a people other than your own. Live their lives for a decade, and then feel free to comment on what they are doing.”

 

I say this loud and clear: as Allah is my witness, my heart jumped for joy as I heard news of these protests, and saw the masses of Egyptians pour out onto the streets, wanting positive change, tired of the puppet-regime that had ruled them for three decades, confronting tanks with their bodies, prostrating to Allah in front of the troops even as they are doused with water guns. How can the heart of ANY believer not be overjoyed seeing the courage that the average Muslim has in opposing the tyrannical regimes that they are living under? And note as well that the protesters are unarmed and non-militant – this is not ‘fighting against the ruler’ but rather protesting against injustice! Lastly, we turn to the scholars of that region to actually pronounce a verdict on those rulers, and to comment on whether their ‘rule’ was even an Islamically permissible one to begin with, such that we can can quote ahadith in support of such rule!

 

Yet, even as a write these words, I also must point out that a sense of complete happiness and blind cheer-leading is premature. This is not the first time that people have protested against a tyrannical regime, nor even forced a brutal dictator to flee. Sadly, all too often, when one dictator flees, another who is even more brutal takes his place. The very country that we are witnessing these protests in is a testimony to this fact: let those who learn from history see who the current dictator’s predecessor was, and by whom was he removed, and how he was removed, and what the effects of that removal were.

 

Therefore, in my humble estimation, instead of immediate triumphalism, the wisest course of action for us here in the West is to have a sense of tempered joy, a feeling of cautious optimism. Yes, we wish for the people of Egypt and Tunisia and many other lands to enjoy the freedoms that our religion allows them to enjoy, and to live peaceful and joyous lives in this world so that they may better prepare for the next. But the lessons from history also allow us – dare I say even require us – to feel a sense of hesitation and perhaps even trepidation. A healthy dose of skepticism is wise if it causes us to form better plan of action.

 

There is little that we can do from afar other than to make du’a for the people of Egypt, and for all Muslims around the world. But there are some moral lessons that we can derive from the events that we are witnessing:

 

Firstly, that the calls by the militants and even by the political Islamist parties did not, in and of themselves, bring about the type of protests that came from the hordes of masses. These groups have been calling for such demonstrations and wanting to see such protests for decades, yet they could not accomplish even a fraction of what the masses have done in this last week. And in this, we learn from the Prophetic methodology: change must begin at the ground level, bottom-up, and not top-down. Change begins in the heart and in the home, and it shall eventually reach the streets and shake the foundations of government.

 

Secondly, we should truly appreciate and thank Allah for our own situation here in the West, where, despite all the negatives of foreign policy and the beginnings of Islamophobia, the two greatest blessings that man needs are still available to us, and we thank Allah ‘…who has given us food to save us from hunger, and protected us from feeling scared’ [Quraysh; 4]. Not everything about ‘the West’ is evil, and we thank Allah for the good even as we strive with every legitimate means to change the bad.

 

And lastly, we should realize the Sunnah of Allah, as we are witnessing it unfold before our very eyes. For indeed, Allah might give a tyrant some respite, but He never neglects such a person, and when Allah’s reckoning comes, it is swift and just. Tyranny is darkness, as our Prophet salla (Allahu alayhi wa sallam) said, and injustice will never be allowed to go unchecked. And if this is happening here, in a Muslim land, how about injustices being perpetrated by others who do not believe in a God nor do they have any humanity left in them? What will entire states who practice injustice against innocent civilians and occupy their lands do when the Lord of those peasants and the Protector of the weak calls the tyrants and occupiers to task? Let them pay heed if they have any heart to do so, for their time shall surely come as well.

 

May Allah guide the people of Egypt to do what is best for Islam and the Muslims!

May Allah protect those protesting on the streets against the tanks and guns and weapons of the regime!

May Allah protect their loved ones from the plunder and looting of thieves and criminals (those in office and on the streets)!

May Allah bring about a state of honor and glory for this religion, where righteous people are shown respect and given office, and the unrighteous are discarded and ignored!

And May Allah protect us all, in this world and the next!

Ameen ya Rabb al-Alimeen!

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_muslimmatters(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/2011/01/31/yasir-qadhi-a-brief-statement-regarding-the-situation-in-egypt/"]Link[/url]

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Sheikh Dr. Yusuf al-Qaradawi to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak: “Step Down”

[using large font size is not allowed]

 

The following is a translation of Dr. Qaradawi’s statement (in Arabic) posted on IslamToday

 

Translated by Dr. Ali Shehata

 

Today, on Saturday 1/29/11, Sheikh Dr. Yusuf al-Qaradawi, calling in to al-Jazeera television, called upon the Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to step down from his leadership in due consideration that there is no solution to the present crisis in Egypt except for him to leave as the Egyptian people have called upon him to do through their peaceful protests.

 

Qaradawi, the President of the Global Association of Muslim Scholars and one of the foremost callers of Sunni Islam in the world today, also said, “I advise President Mubarak to leave Egypt as there is no other solution to the current problem except for him to leave.” And he added by saying to him, “Leave O’ Mubarak, have mercy on these people and leave before the ruin of Egypt grows worse.” He also said, “You should no longer stay Mubarak. I advise you to learn from the experience of the ousted Tunisian president Bin Ali. I would prefer that a civil court tries you rather than to be tried by the masses.” He then emphasized to the Egyptian leader, “I urge you to leave, you have presided for 30 years already,” clarifying that he speaks on behalf of “the scholars of Egypt and the rest of the world.”

 

He then relayed some words to the Egyptian people saying, “Continue in your protests” but cautioned that transgression against state institutions (burning them, looting them, etc.) was prohibited by Islam. And he emphasized the necessity that the protest effort continues in a civil and peaceful manner. He also contended that the Egyptian political system was “blind and could not see, deaf and could not hear, stupid and could not understand” evidenced by the fact the the Egyptian President “came out to us in the night to deliver a speech (regarding the appointment of a vice-president) as if he was living in another world than the rest of us.”

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_muslimmatters(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/2011/01/31/sheikh-dr-yusuf-al-qaradawis-to-egyptian-president-hosni-mubarak-step-down/"]Link[/url]

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Yasir Qadhi | A Brief Statement Regarding the Situation in Egypt

 

But for those here in America, who dare criticize the Egyptian masses based upon their own understandings of a set of hadith, I say to them, “Hold your tongues! You are not living in their situation. You have not experienced years and decades of economic, social and political repression. You have no right to pass verdicts on the situation of a people other than your own. Live their lives for a decade, and then feel free to comment on what they are doing.â€

 

Very well said, mashallah!

 

JazakAllah khair freedslave for your valuable contribution to this thread.

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Yasir Qadhi | A Brief Statement Regarding the Situation in Egypt

 

However, regarding Yasir Qadhi, there is a warning on YouTube regarding him. Doesn't hurt to check it out: Warning on Yasir Qadhi.

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However, regarding Yasir Qadhi, there is a warning on YouTube regarding him. Doesn't hurt to check it out: Warning on Yasir Qadhi.

 

So typically Muslim of us, isn't it? A message of solidarity from a scholar behind the people of Egypt, and it then is turned and politicised into questioning the integrity of that scholar, which has nothing to do with this thread.

We don't need enemies do we? We Muslims have our ownselves to divide us. :sl:

 

For what you've said, I leave such disagreements of the fuqaha for them to resolve. If it is not resolved we just have to accept that there is disagreement in opinion. For the issue concerning this thread, I believe Yasir Qadhi got it right.

 

In more recent developments, I heard some suspicious pro-Mubarak supporters clashed with the anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square in Cairo. Reports say about three people died from gunfire or explosions.

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yettelegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8300072/Egypt-crisis-protestors-killed-as-gunfire-breaks-out-in-Cairo.html"]Link[/url]

 

May Allah :sl: help to increase the imaan of the righteous people of Egypt in these difficult times, and help them in delivering justice to perpetrators and oppressors.

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A Muslim does not fight and is ready to die so someone can have a job in this world, we only fight in the name of Allah not of a country that doesn’t exist.

 

Does a Muslim fight to protect his mother from a thief? To save his brother from torture? The corruption in Egypt is big that the government has become a thief. The police in Egypt can do anything, including torture

 

By your thinking--a Muslim should never stand up for himself.

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For the issue concerning this thread, I believe Yasir Qadhi got it right.

 

Yes, he did. I do agree. I thanked you for the article you posted. But knowing about the warning issued against him doesn't hurt. At least one is aware of such things.

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Yes, he did. I do agree. I thanked you for the article you posted. But knowing about the warning issued against him doesn't hurt. At least one is aware of such things.

 

I guess one could say that there is awareness, and I am thankful for that. Let's leave the issue at this point.

 

With regards to the topic, one can find detailed and live updates on the daily events in Egypt (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetguardian.co.uk/news/blog/2011/feb/03/egypt-protests-live-updates"]here.[/url]

 

I have to say the will of the protesters is amazing, and I hope they have a plan for their actions, and for their country.

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May Allah guide the people of Egypt to do what is best for Islam and the Muslims!

May Allah protect those protesting on the streets against the tanks and guns and weapons of the regime!

May Allah protect their loved ones from the plunder and looting of thieves and criminals (those in office and on the streets)!

May Allah bring about a state of honor and glory for this religion, where righteous people are shown respect and given office, and the unrighteous are discarded and ignored!

And May Allah protect us all, in this world and the next!

 

Ameen! May Allah have mercy upon us all.

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Does a Muslim fight to protect his mother from a thief? To save his brother from torture? The corruption in Egypt is big that the government has become a thief. The police in Egypt can do anything, including torture

 

By your thinking--a Muslim should never stand up for himself.

 

If a Muslim will surrender his life, it should be for the sake of Allah, not for a worldly gain. Reclaiming the land of Egypt is a worldly gain. Fighting oppression for the sake of Allah turns it into the greatest act of good. Think of it this way. A man who gives charity to help the needy, and the one who gives charity to be known as a generous man. Same act, motives as different as day and night.

 

Also, protecting one's mother or a fellow Muslim is a requirement upon a Muslim - it is not a worldly gain. Allah commands us to help those who are oppressed and to be kind to our parents.

 

Salam.

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...protecting one's mother or a fellow Muslim is a requirement upon a Muslim - it is not a worldly gain. Allah commands us to help those who are oppressed and to be kind to our parents.

 

Salam.

 

OK, so the protesters are justified.

 

Is Dot still Admin here? Is he OK? What does he think?

 

Or is this a taboo topic?

 

Shouldn't you be happy Islamic parties will be able to openly operate in Egypt?

 

Also... a story of what happens inside an Egyptian prison... where countless Muslims are taken to be tortured.: (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetguardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/09/egypt-torture-machine-mubarak-security"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetguardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/0...ubarak-security[/url]

Edited by skibture

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