Jump to content
Islamic Forum
Sign in to follow this  
bornagainmoslem

Why Muslems Have To Be Fearful Of Allah

Recommended Posts

Why a creator such as Allah must keep remind his createe to be fearful of him at all times. What is the purpose of creating a human?..To be fearfull of Allah at al times? I am sure the Almighty God is not that cruel. Any comment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why a creator such as Allah must keep remind his createe to be fearful of him at all times. What is the purpose of creating a human?..To be fearfull of Allah at al times? I am sure the Almighty God is not that cruel. Any comment?

 

Although I'm not sure what is the Arabic word you mean, while I'll guess it's "ÇáÊÞæí-ÅÊÞæÇ" and this word don't mean "fearful", and I believe it don't have the exact English word. it's mostly "protect/guard yourself" and "Take care about Allah's orders" which will be by both love and fearing.

 

After long experiencing the life, and thoroughly studying the human being nature, they reached the concept that human will move forward (obey the rules for his own benefits), either by loving motivations and/or Fearing punishment/deterring.

 

After long struggling, propaganda's programs, money spending to teach the people how the cars' safety belts are so useful, very few accepted to use it. The thinkers, wise men, congress and senate launched the legislations "whoever don't wear it he will be punished with this or that"…..done

 

Whoever cross a red light sign will be punished with this or that

In work, in school, in the army, …….. , every where and every country on that earth…..

 

The people are different and even the single human being have different life phases and modes, and so we still in need for love and fearing for the benefit of all.

 

If that concept is the proper to save humans, why not to use it?

 

If you think for a while you will find the god is the most worthy of being loved and feared

 

May Allah show you and all the Moslems the right way

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your ego understands only fear of the fire.

 

I read that somewhere one of Muhammad's (God rest his soul) companions fainted in real fear because of hell fire, and at that numerous times a night.

 

Most people just get on with life: however, when someone has fallen aside into too much despair or too much false hope then a specific teaching has to be given.

 

Two stories to illustrate this from my Orthodox Church:

 

A man entered a monastery because of some serious sin. Many, many years later, he still did not know whether Allaah had forgiven his sins. Seeing this, someone asked that abbot (the head of the monastery) about this. The abbot replied that Allaah forgave his sin as soon as he started to repent, but it is because he would become proud that Allaah had not let him know of his forgiveness.

 

There was a woman who was tortured by the thought that Allaah might not forgive her sins. She was told by a monk, "Now don't be afraid, the Lord is good. He will forgive all of our sins and will grant us both salvation". So even though she would commit further sins, she had the infallible knowledge that Allaah would accept her anyway: such is the love of Allaah.

 

Nevertheless, I too have the impression that Islaam cannot say anything else to someone tortured by despair of Allaah's mercy except to say that such despair is sinful: this does not help.

 

Have I just been given a one-sided view of Islaam, or can Muslims here grasp the love of Allaah that can overlook all future sins because an expression of Allaah's love causes the receiver to respond in love?

 

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Islam set the proper balance between good beliefs and good deeds, the Moslem have to be in the proper balanced position between:

 

trusting the God mercy and afraid not to worth it

loving the god and admiring him

aiming to the paradise and afraid of the hell

 

all the Islamic teachings is just aiming to do so, just like a mass that suspended by two springs one from above and one from beneath. when ever the circumstances take him to one side, the other spring will take him back to the balance.

 

both extremes have bad side effects: totally trust the paradise will lead many to sin, while totally trust the hell will lead many to despair

 

if the Moslem leaned to one side of both, then he ignored the Islamic teachings that enforces the other side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why a creator such as Allah must keep remind his createe to be fearful of him at all times. What is the purpose of creating a human?..To be fearfull of Allah at al times? I am sure the Almighty God is not that cruel. Any comment?
I fear GOD, but I am not afraid of HIM. The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge and wisdom!

BUT the fearful and unbeliving will have thir part in the lake of fire

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I fear GOD, but I am not afraid of HIM. The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge and wisdom!

BUT the fearful and unbeliving will have thir part in the lake of fire

What an odd thing to say. If I said I fear earthquakes, but am not afraid of earthquakes, who would understand what I am saying?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What an odd thing to say. If I said I fear earthquakes, but am not afraid of earthquakes, who would understand what I am saying?

LOL, What an odd question. What do earthquake have to do with relationships?

Godly fear is a profound worship and respect and being aware of how awesome God is and knowing that we have sinned and fall short of His glory, and that he could destroy us soul and body in hell (not that He will), but being afraid is the opposite of faith. Without faith it is not possible to please God. For those that come to Him must believe He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligiently seek Him. Paul said we can come boldly to the throne of grace, because of what Jesus has done for us!

Edited by BurningLight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I fear GOD, but I am not afraid of HIM. The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge and wisdom!

BUT the fearful and unbeliving will have thir part in the lake of fire

 

I know the difference between these two. But if you don't mind can you please explain the difference between fear and afraid the way you see it.

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LOL, What an odd question. What do earthquake have to do with relationships?

They don't. It's called using a hypothetical in order to analyze. I retained the structure of your sentence, but replaced the noun in order to demonstrate the oddity of it.

Godly fear is a profound worship and respect and being aware of how awesome God is and knowing that we have sinned and fall short of His glory, and that he could destroy us soul and body in hell (not that He will), but being afraid is the opposite of faith. Without faith it is not possible to please God. For those that come to Him must believe He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligiently seek Him. Paul said we can come boldly to the throne of grace, because of what Jesus has done for us!

So fear is awe? Then why not say "I respect/am in awe of/revere God, but I am not afraid of him"? That would make more sense. If I fear something, I am afraid of it. I would ask you to find any other context outside of your reference to God in which this relationship does not hold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Muslims have the comfort of knowing that if something had (already) happenned, then it was destined to happen, it was written and there's nothing can change it.

If it was a sin then he should regret/repent and get on with life.

But since he doesn't know what is written, he should endavour the best he can - as far as the present/future is concerned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They don't. It's called using a hypothetical in order to analyze. I retained the structure of your sentence, but replaced the noun in order to demonstrate the oddity of it.
I know what you did. IMO, that is odd. Would you think it odd if I said he is a clown, but he is no fool?

 

So fear is awe? Then why not say "I respect/am in awe of/revere God, but I am not afraid of him"? That would make more sense. If I fear something, I am afraid of it. I would ask you to find any other context outside of your reference to God in which this relationship does not hold.
What you say is not exactly correct; It is to simplistic; there is a difference between fear and to be afraid. As I mentioned, I am not afraid of God, but I fear him.

 

Do Not Be Afraid... Fear God!

 

Moses said to the people, "Do not be afraid; for God has come in order to test you, and in order that the fear of Him may remain with you, so that you may not sin." (Exodus 20:20). This is an interesting verse, and the one from which the title of this article is taken. At first glance, the title suggests a paradox in the counsel Moses gave to the people. "Do not be afraid" and "fear of Him" almost seems to be at odds with one another. They are not; rather, they compliment one another.

 

"Afraid" Versus "Fear"

It helps to understand that there are different kinds of "fear". Sometimes it means to be cowardly. At other times it means to be terrified. At other times it means to have a reverent respect. When it comes to fearing the Lord, usually the Bible is using "fear" in the sense of reverential fear; (as I told you godly fear) to stand in awe of God. We need this kind of fear to be pleasing to Him. The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom; A good understanding have all those who do His commandments; His praise endures forever. (Psalm 111:10; see also Ecclesiastes 12:13). However, the Bible also tells us that to face God in judgment after a life of unrepentant sin will cause us to have "fear" in the sense of terror (Hebrews 10:26-31). This is a fear we should seek to avoid, and by God's grace through our faith, we will avoid.

 

Practical Fear

Practical fear is understanding the consequences of certain actions and therefore avoiding them. As an old song says, "That's why you don't tug on Superman's cape" and "You don't pull the mask off the ole' Lone Ranger". A lack of this kind of fear can cause people to behave recklessly. A park ranger at the Grand Canyon once explained to a group of tourists why they should not show off by letting their legs dangle over the sides of the cliff, "We lose several a year" , he said. This kind of fear is not a negative thing at all. It is the fool who "has no fear" in this regard. And when it comes to the Lord and His commandments, again, it is foolish to "have no fear" in this sense. Practical fear comes hand in hand with knowledge. A baby has to be watched because he or she has not learned the consequences of dangerous behavior. On the spiritual side concerning our relationship with God, one who has fear understands the consequences of disobeying God and is not willing to, so to speak, "dangle his/her legs over the cliff" by testing God with sinful behavior. Instead, one who has practical fear seeks to avoid sin and neglect, and walk the path that God has appointed. Such a one appreciates God's mercy ad obeys His covenant (2 Peter 3:9,14,15; Romans 11:33-36).

 

Anxiety

Anxiety is also a type of fear. Anxiety is stress which comes from a lack of trust in God. Many times, it expresses itself in terms of hopeless despair and is often self incriminating. One may hold that he is inadequate for the tasks of life, and especially during times of difficulty become cynical and defeatist. Jesus said that there was no room for this kind of fear in the lives of His disciples. "For this reason I say to you, do not be worried about your life, as to what you will eat or what you will drink; nor for your body, as to what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? " (Matthew 6:25; see 6:25-34). A better comprehension of God's plan, what things are most important, the setting of higher goals and an unswerving trust in the love, care, power and wisdom of God to bring our lives to their very best possible conclusion here and to glory in eternity will help overcome anxiety.

 

No Fear

Fearlessness is often thought of as a very positive trait. It isn't, at least not always. We have already discussed the dangers of having no fear when it leads to reckless and thoughtless actions. It also brings disaster when one has no fear of the Lord. When one ignores the warnings of living with contempt for God's word, he or she is inviting disaster. How accurate is the Psalmists portrayal of such a one! Transgression speaks to the ungodly within his heart; There is no fear of God before his eyes. For it flatters him in his own eyes concerning the discovery of his iniquity and the hatred of it. The words of his mouth are wickedness and deceit; he has ceased to be wise and to do good. He plans wickedness upon his bed; he sets himself on a path that is not good; He does not despise evil. (Psalm 36:1-4). Such a one is quite willing to flirt with disaster because of a lack of fear. Without repentance, the disaster will become permanent. (Have you ever heard the expression fools rush in where angels fear to thread?)

 

Holy Fear

One who has proper respect for Almighty God possesses a holy and righteous fear which is good, clean and right. It brings about a proper regard for the will of God in everyday living. In times of trouble, it leads one to flee to the Rock of refuge we have in God. Behold, the eye of the LORD is on those who fear Him, on those who hope for His lovingkindess, To deliver their soul from death and to keep them alive in famine. Our soul waits for the LORD; He is our help and our shield. For our heart rejoices in Him, because we trust in His holy name. Let Your lovingkindness, O LORD, be upon us, according as we have hoped in You. (Psalm 33:18-22).This kind of fear lives and speaks according to the Lord's will. It may or may not be popular in society to take a moral, doctrinal or spiritual stand based on the Bible's teachings on a certain issue, but that is where one who fears the Lord chooses to stand (2 Timothy 4:2). In whatever culture and time, the Bible tells us who is acceptable unto God. Opening his mouth, Peter said: "I most certainly understand now that God is not one to show partiality, but in every nation the man who fears Him and does what is right is welcome to Him. (Acts 10:34,35).

 

Love is a motivator in choosing to live our lives for God, but so is the right kind of fear. In fact, the right kind of love will cast out the wrong kind of fear. By this, love is perfected with us, so that we may have confidence in the day of judgment; because as He is, so also are we in this world. There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves punishment, and the one who fears is not perfected in love. (1 John 4:17-18). Fear God. Keep His commandments.

 

By Jon W. Quinn

From Expository Files 10.8; August 2003

 

 

This explains exhaustively what I am trying to tell you.

Edited by BurningLight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know what you did. IMO, that is odd. Would you think it odd if I said he is a clown, but he is no fool?

A clown does not have to be a fool, and a fool does not have to be a clown. In contrast with this, the definition of afraid is to feel fear. There is a direct connection between them that is lacking in your example. Also, your example fails to emulate mine because mine retained the concept under analysis, namely the relationship between fear and being afraid, it only modified a non-essential element of the statement in order to further shed light on the relationship.

 

Also, I am quite familiar with the religious jargon Christianity builds up around these two terms in an effort to save themselves. I even gave you an out by offering the words like awe or reverence as alternates. You could have easily selected one of these if you had so chosen. As for the rest of your religious based defense of the distinction, I feel it is just as strained as your use of the two words. I ask you again, what other context could you ever say that you fear something but are not afraid of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A clown does not have to be a fool, and a fool does not have to be a clown. In contrast with this, the definition of afraid is to feel fear. There is a direct connection between them that is lacking in your example. Also, your example fails to emulate mine because mine retained the concept under analysis, namely the relationship between fear and being afraid, it only modified a non-essential element of the statement in order to further shed light on the relationship.

 

Also, I am quite familiar with the religious jargon Christianity builds up around these two terms in an effort to save themselves. I even gave you an out by offering the words like awe or reverence as alternates. You could have easily selected one of these if you had so chosen. As for the rest of your religious based defense of the distinction, I feel it is just as strained as your use of the two words. I ask you again, what other context could you ever say that you fear something but are not afraid of it.

Exactly, a clown does not have to be a fool and a fool doesn't have to be a clown, but they can be both too! In the same way you can fear God and not be afraid of Him and you can be afraid and not fear. For instance, you can be afraid of the torment, but not fear the tormentor!

Did you read anything of what I sent regarding the different kinds of fear and fear verses being afraid? Fear and afraid are also different words that are not necessarily synomnous. It depends on the connotation and context. Why are you making a mountain out of a mole hill? I gave you an example already; you called it odd. I fear GOD, but I am not afraid of HIM. I love HIM and HE LOVES me. I am not afraid of my relationship with HIM. I appreciate you gave me an out by choosing words such as awe, reverence as alternates, and I thought I used them, but what's the point of you giving me an out when you got me in to begin with? IMO, it's tantamount to a hacker giving you a virus than tries to sell you a program to get out of it? I am though with this topic on fear's definition and all the semantics!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's fair to say that one 'fears' God because you simply don't know what He might do next, being God.

One sometimes cringes in fear of His almightyness in comparison with one's pitiful lack of autonomous power.

 

Sallam,

 

ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Exactly, a clown does not have to be a fool and a fool doesn't have to be a clown, but they can be both too! In the same way you can fear God and not be afraid of Him and you can be afraid and not fear. For instance, you can be afraid of the torment, but not fear the tormentor!

Your example is off again because you change the noun (torment to tormentor). This annuls any analytical benefit to the hypothesis since you have abandoned the structure of the initial statement under analysis.

 

Did you read anything of what I sent regarding the different kinds of fear and fear verses being afraid? Fear and afraid are also different words that are not necessarily synomnous. It depends on the connotation and context. Why are you making a mountain out of a mole hill? I gave you an example already; you called it odd. I fear GOD, but I am not afraid of HIM. I love HIM and HE LOVES me. I am not afraid of my relationship with HIM. I appreciate you gave me an out by choosing words such as awe, reverence as alternates, and I thought I used them, but what's the point of you giving me an out when you got me in to begin with? IMO, it's tantamount to a hacker giving you a virus than tries to sell you a program to get out of it? I am though with this topic on fear's definition and all the semantics!

Of course I read it, as I indicated to you in my last post. I told you it was all very familiar to me and as equally discombobulated as your statement we are discussing. I challenge you once again to come up with another statement in which you fear something but are not afraid of it. You have so far failed to do this, the one thing that would convincingly argue your case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your example is off again because you change the noun (torment to tormentor). This annuls any analytical benefit to the hypothesis since you have abandoned the structure of the initial statement under analysis.

Of course I read it, as I indicated to you in my last post. I told you it was all very familiar to me and as equally discombobulated as your statement we are discussing. I challenge you once again to come up with another statement in which you fear something but are not afraid of it. You have so far failed to do this, the one thing that would convincingly argue your case.

I at one time feared my propensity to lust after a certain woman, but I wasn't afraid of that woman or the lustful acts or my tendancy toward lust at the time of acting out. I can think of other examples, but if this will do, I'll let it go at that. How's that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I at one time feared my propensity to lust after a certain woman, but I wasn't afraid of that woman or the lustful acts or my tendancy toward lust at the time of acting out. I can think of other examples, but if this will do, I'll let it go at that. How's that?

Another erroneous example. You feared your propensity for lust, but didn't fear lust and didn't fear a particular woman. Again, these are not the same nouns. I anticipate you will continue to have trouble coming up with another example that actually fits the pattern of your original statement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Another erroneous example. You feared your propensity for lust, but didn't fear lust and didn't fear a particular woman. Again, these are not the same nouns. I anticipate you will continue to have trouble coming up with another example that actually fits the pattern of your original statement.

I thought they were verbs, and fear can be a verb. Why is this so important to you. What are you trying to prove? Are you trying to justifying calling my statement odd that I fear god but I am not afraid of him? This discussion is a waste of time! My statmenet was only meant to apply to god nothing else; so why do you want an example of something that is not revelant? lol

Edited by BurningLight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought they were verbs, and fear can be a verb.

Sure, but if you aren't applying the verb to the same noun, then of course you could fear one thing and not be afraid of a different thing. There is nothing controversial about that.

 

Why is this so important to you. What are you trying to prove? Are you trying to justifying calling my statement odd that I fear god but I am not afraid of him? This discussion is a waste of time! My statement was only meant to apply to god nothing else; so why do you want an example of something that is not revelant?

Well, I suppose I have a number of reasons. In no particular order:

  1. It is an odd statement, so why not question it?
  2. This is a discussion board, so what else would we do here if not discuss things?
  3. You chose to defend it, and I thought your defense was inadequate and so pointed that out.
  4. I sometimes wonder if Christianity isn't whitewashing the Bible by making terms mean something other than their obvious meaning. Perhaps you really should be fearing God in a more normal sense of the word. After all, he has demonstrated a propensity for occasions of terrifying wrath against those who displease him.

But honestly, while you may suspect some ulterior motive, I think #'s 1 was my initial primary motivation (with shades of # 4 behind it), but this was quickly subsumed by my love of logic and so # 3 subsequently drove me onward in the discussion. I actually like discussing things like logic and arguments, so if you don't please let me know and you can end it at any time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sure, but if you aren't applying the verb to the same noun, then of course you could fear one thing and not be afraid of a different thing. There is nothing controversial about that.

Well, I suppose I have a number of reasons. In no particular order:

  1. It is an odd statement, so why not question it?
  2. This is a discussion board, so what else would we do here if not discuss things?
  3. You chose to defend it, and I thought your defense was inadequate and so pointed that out.
  4. I sometimes wonder if Christianity isn't whitewashing the Bible by making terms mean something other than their obvious meaning. Perhaps you really should be fearing God in a more normal sense of the word. After all, he has demonstrated a propensity for occasions of terrifying wrath against those who displease him.

But honestly, while you may suspect some ulterior motive, I think #'s 1 was my initial primary motivation (with shades of # 4 behind it), but this was quickly subsumed by my love of logic and so # 3 subsequently drove me onward in the discussion. I actually like discussing things like logic and arguments, so if you don't please let me know and you can end it at any time.

First of all, GOD is good and it is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living god. I like a discussion with logic as well, but I like for it to be going somewhere rather than making someone look odd. I am not saying you're calling me odd, but if someone says odd things that inference can be easily made. You say I didn't address your question adequately. Well, i beg to differ. I guess we can friendly agree to disagree. To be honest with you, I know you have said differently, but I feel you have more in common with Islam than you do with Christianity! But I think you have more in common with agnosticism than Christianity or Islam. I think you've been hurt by Christians for that I am sorry, but I have been hurt by them too. Edited by BurningLight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know you have said differently, but I feel you have more in common with Islam than you do with Christianity! But I think you have more in common with agnosticism than Christianity or Islam. I think you've been hurt by Christians for that I am sorry, but I have been hurt by them too.

Well, yes, I certainly do have more in common with agnosticism than either Christianity or Islam, since I am agnostic on the theoretic question of God's existence. But I haven't been hurt by Christians, so there is no need to be sorry. My experience with Christians has been and continues to be overwhelmingly positive, especially with those I am in regular contact with in real life. My own lack of faith is much more about theory and personal than with negative social interactions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, yes, I certainly do have more in common with agnosticism than either Christianity or Islam, since I am agnostic on the theoretic question of God's existence. But I haven't been hurt by Christians, so there is no need to be sorry. My experience with Christians has been and continues to be overwhelmingly positive, especially with those I am in regular contact with in real life. My own lack of faith is much more about theory and personal than with negative social interactions.

I cannot argue with your testimony. It seems if we Christians and Muslims want to engage you in logical challenging discussion it would have to be on the exsistence of god. You cannot make a choice of what religion you identify with until you believe fully there is a god. Then you have to know who the real god is. Even though both Christians and Muslims believe there is only one god (Muslims challenge us on that), and even though he is Creator of all who numbers the grains of sand and names the countless stars in the heavens, our god differs. There god doesn't have a son and ours does, but not in the biological sense, but that is another discussion.

Edited by BurningLight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While it is possible, I doubt you will argue me into belief that there is a God. From your perspective, I think it would be more effective to simply pray that God opens my eyes to the truth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×