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SaracenSoldier

Columbus Day? True Legacy: Cruelty And Slavery

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Second, Columbus wasn't a hero. When he set foot on that sandy beach in the Bahamas on October 12, 1492, Columbus discovered that the islands were inhabited by friendly, peaceful people called the Lucayans, Taínos and Arawaks. Writing in his diary, Columbus said they were a handsome, smart and kind people. He noted that the gentle Arawaks were remarkable for their hospitality. "They offered to share with anyone and when you ask for something, they never say no," he said. The Arawaks had no weapons; their society had neither criminals, prisons nor prisoners. They were so kind-hearted that Columbus noted in his diary that on the day the Santa Maria was shipwrecked, the Arawaks labored for hours to save his crew and cargo. The native people were so honest that not one thing was missing.

 

Columbus was so impressed with the hard work of these gentle islanders, that he immediately seized their land for Spain and enslaved them to work in his brutal gold mines. Within only two years, 125,000 (half of the population) of the original natives on the island were dead.

 

If I were a Native American, I would mark October 12, 1492, as a black day on my calendar.

 

Shockingly, Columbus supervised the selling of native girls into sexual slavery. Young girls of the ages 9 to 10 were the most desired by his men. In 1500, Columbus casually wrote about it in his log. He said: "A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand."

 

He forced these peaceful natives work in his gold mines until they died of exhaustion. If an "Indian" worker did not deliver his full quota of gold dust by Columbus' deadline, soldiers would cut off the man's hands and tie them around his neck to send a message. Slavery was so intolerable for these sweet, gentle island people that at one point, 100 of them committed mass suicide. Catholic law forbade the enslavement of Christians, but Columbus solved this problem. He simply refused to baptize the native people of Hispaniola.

 

Read more: (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yethuffingtonpost(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/eric-kasum/columbus-day-a-bad-idea_b_742708.html"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yethuffingtonpost(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/eric-kasum/c...a_b_742708.html[/url]

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PropellerAds

It's a mixed legacy. There are positives, exploration, pushing the boundaries of knowledge, etc. But yes, it also had many negative consequences. Unfortunately, it occurred in a time when there didn't seem to be as much concern for human life and rights as there is today (not that today is perfect, far from it).

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