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Nobel Prize For "killing Allah"

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(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_english.al-akhbar(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/content/salafists-denounce-late-mahfouz-his-centennial"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_english.al-akhbar(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/content/salaf...-his-centennial[/url]

 

This part seemed appropriate

 

Critic Hussein Hammouda, for his part, is certain that those who denounce Mahfouz’s literature probably never read a single novel he wrote. They formed their opinions about him and his work simply through word of mouth.

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I did read it. The death of the fictional God was certainly included in the summary of the book, but I don't remember it saying that this was the reason he won the nobel prize for literature.

 

Was one of the novels, he didn't get a nobel for just one novel, but for a few, and this was one of them as mentioned in the press release.

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(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_english.al-akhbar(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/content/salafists-denounce-late-mahfouz-his-centennial"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_english.al-akhbar(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/content/salaf...-his-centennial[/url]

 

This part seemed appropriate

 

Critic Hussein Hammouda, for his part, is certain that those who denounce Mahfouz’s literature probably never read a single novel he wrote. They formed their opinions about him and his work simply through word of mouth.

 

Maybe he should focus on the main source .. (you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetnobelprize(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1988/press.html"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetnobelprize(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/nobel_prizes/lit...1988/press.html[/url]

 

I assume he didn't read this part "The theme of the unusual novel Children of Gebelawi (1959) is man's everlasting search for spiritual values. Adam and Eve, Moses, Jesus, Mohammed and others, as well as the modern scientist, appear thinly disguised. It is the scientist who ultimately is responsible for the primeval father Gebelawi's (God's) death. Different norm systems are confronted with tension in the description of the conflict between good and evil. On account of the way in which higher things are treated the book could not be printed in the author's own country but was published elsewhere."

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The critic, Hussein Hammouda, is still right. The main source of his writings are, of course, his writings. Not what people have to say about them.

Edited by xocoti

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It is the scientist who ultimately is responsible for the primeval father Gebelawi's (God's) death.

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Was one of the novels, he didn't get a nobel for just one novel, but for a few, and this was one of them as mentioned in the press release.

Why wouldn't it be mentioned if it was one of his notable works? It also mentioned another work in detail and several works in short summaries of various lengths.

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Why wouldn't it be mentioned if it was one of his notable works? It also mentioned another work in detail and several works in short summaries of various lengths.

 

Its mentioned in the press release on the nobel prize web site, I posted the link before and will do it again, maybe you missed it :sl:

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetnobelprize(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1988/press.html"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetnobelprize(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/nobel_prizes/lit...1988/press.html[/url]

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Its mentioned in the press release on the nobel prize web site, I posted the link before and will do it again, maybe you missed it :sl:

 

(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetnobelprize(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1988/press.html"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetnobelprize(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/nobel_prizes/lit...1988/press.html[/url]

I have read the link at least three times now. It does mention the book you are offended by, but it also mentions several other books. I will quote the entire thing and highlight the sections I am talking about:

Through the Swedish Academy's decision this year the Nobel Prize in Literature has for the first time been awarded to an Egyptian. Naguib Mahfouz was born and lives in Cairo. He is also the first literary Nobel Prizewinner with Arabic as his native tongue.

 

To date Mahfouz has been writing for about fifty years. At the age of 77 he is still indefatigable.

 

Mahfouz's great and decisive achievement is as the writer of novels and short stories. His production has meant a powerful upswing for the novel as a genre and for the development of the literary language in Arabic-speaking cultural circles. The range is however greater than that. His work speaks to us all.

 

The earliest novels are set in the Pharaonic milieu of ancient Egypt. But here already there are side-long glances at today's society.

 

A series of Cairo novels takes place at the present day. To them belongs Midaq Alley (1947). The alley becomes a stage, which holds together a motley crowd, all drawn with telling psychological realism.

 

Mahfouz really made his name with the big Trilogy (1956-57). In the centre is a family and its vicissitudes from the end of the 1910s to the middle of the 1940s. The series of novels has autobiographical elements. The depiction of the individuals relates very clearly to intellectual, social and political conditions. On the whole through his writings Mahfouz has exerted considerable influence in his country.

 

The theme of the unusual novel Children of Gebelawi (1959) is man's everlasting search for spiritual values. Adam and Eve, Moses, Jesus, Mohammed and others, as well as the modern scientist, appear thinly disguised. It is the scientist who ultimately is responsible for the primeval father Gebelawi's (God's) death. Different norm systems are confronted with tension in the description of the conflict between good and evil. On account of the way in which higher things are treated the book could not be printed in the author's own country but was published elsewhere.

 

A Houseboat on the Nile (1966 - not yet translated into English) is an example of Mahfouz's impressive novellas. Here metaphysical conversations are carried on in the borderland between reality and illusion. At the same time the text forms itself into a comment on the intellectual climate in the country.

 

Mahfouz is also an excellent short story writer. In the volume of selected stories God's World (1973) we get a very good view of what he has achieved in this field. The artistic treatment of the existential questions is forceful and the formal solutions often striking.

 

There has been a tendency to divide Mahfouz's writings into a number of periods, e.g. a historical, a realistic and a metaphysical-mystical. Naturally this has not happened without reason. However, the illumination throughout of human life in general should also be emphasized.

 

"If the urge to write should ever leave me", Mahfouz said in an interview recently, "I want that day to be my last."

 

My question, "Why wouldn't it be mentioned if it was one of his notable works?" was rhetorical, and meant to be understood as a positive statement that of course the work would be mentioned since it was a notable work of his.

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(you are not allowed to post links yet)"you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetarabist(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/blog/2011/12/13/naguib-mahfouz-an-appreciation.html"]you can't post links until you reach 50 posts_you are not allowed to post links yetarabist(contact admin if its a beneficial link)/blog/2011/12/13/nag...preciation.html[/url]

 

The impact of Mahfouz’s work cannot be overstated. He was an extraordinary writer. And as Lebanese novelist Elias Khoury once said, Mahfouz almost single-handedly gave Arabic literature every form of the 20th century novel, bestowing a modern literary heritage on the novelists that followed him and freeing them to experiment.

 

They don't hand out Nobel Prizes for just one work of literature.

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I have read the link at least three times now. It does mention the book you are offended by, but it also mentions several other books. I will quote the entire thing and highlight the sections I am talking about:

My question, "Why wouldn't it be mentioned if it was one of his notable works?" was rhetorical, and meant to be understood as a positive statement that of course the work would be mentioned since it was a notable work of his.

 

I don't know why its not mentioned, but I am sure you read the paragraph of " Theme of the unusual novel .. " wouldn't that be direct enough as an insult ?

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I don't know why its not mentioned, but I am sure you read the paragraph of " Theme of the unusual novel .. " wouldn't that be direct enough as an insult ?

Why is it an insult to call one of his novels unusual? I don't think I am understanding your objection here.

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Why is it an insult to call one of his novels unusual? I don't think I am understanding your objection here.

 

You will find after that in the paragraph " It is the scientist who ultimately is responsible for the primeval father Gebelawi's (God's) death. " .. that's the whole point .. a novel that reaches an ending by killing god

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You will find after that in the paragraph " It is the scientist who ultimately is responsible for the primeval father Gebelawi's (God's) death. " .. that's the whole point .. a novel that reaches an ending by killing god

I know that. I agree that he wrote a novel in which his fictional god was killed in the end. I was merely disputing that he got a nobel prize in literature for "killing Allah". I would argue rather that he got the prize for a lifetime of writing that demonstrated a high level of literary skill in the view of the judges who awarded him the prize. Only one of the many books and short stories he wrote has a fictional god dying in the end.

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I know that. I agree that he wrote a novel in which his fictional god was killed in the end. I was merely disputing that he got a nobel prize in literature for "killing Allah". I would argue rather that he got the prize for a lifetime of writing that demonstrated a high level of literary skill in the view of the judges who awarded him the prize. Only one of the many books and short stories he wrote has a fictional god dying in the end.

 

Okay, I got what you mean now, but also for me it doesn't matter how much he wrote as long as he crossed the line and involved god.

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