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KenPruitt

Ramadan Problem! Need Help!

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Hey. I live in Tennessee, and this is my first Ramadan. I'm not so sure I should do Ramadan because not only is it severely hindering my work, but due to the outrageous humidity and heat where I live, hydration is pretty much an absolute must. I know the Qur'an says that if fasting would bring extreme difficulty to you to not fast, but I can't even feed the homeless either!

 

Does anyone else have anything close to a problem like this, and if so, does anyone have any advice? Because I'm seriously considering not doing Ramadan anymore because of these things.

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As salaam alaykum

 

Have you tried fasting so far?

 

And yes it is difficult but think about the people in very hot climates who have to deal with hunger on a daily basis - and they don't do it out of choice. That is one thing Ramadan tries to help us remember. Also there are millions of Muslims in the world who fast in really hot climates like yours and they don't die.

 

I presume you are a new Muslim as you said this is your first Ramadan and if you have fasted until now then that is a big achievement for a new Muslim. But I wouldn't advise you to give up. Make sure during the times when you can eat you drink plenty of water and eat well. You must remember that fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam and its benefits are numerous.

 

Narrated Abu Huraira: Allah's Apostle said, "Whoever observes fasts during the month of Ramadan out of sincere faith, and hoping to attain Allah's rewards, then all his past sins will be forgiven." (Sahih Bukhari Book 2, Hadith no37)

 

Of course the decision lies with you but pray to Allah to give you the strength to continue and remember we are all held accountable for our actions.

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In my opinion, regardless of the weather and humidity and everything else, fasting can still be undertaken. Yes, it is not easy, but I don't think many things Allah calls on us to do are always easy, but the rewards far outweigh the struggle.

 

I am also going through my first Ramadan as well as being in Virginia where I think today was the first day under 90 degrees in several weeks just about. To me, I view it as something to work on, and I generally have not been struggling much at all. I pray that Allah helps you find the strength to overcome this test, trust in him.

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Hey. I live in Tennessee, and this is my first Ramadan. I'm not so sure I should do Ramadan because not only is it severely hindering my work, but due to the outrageous humidity and heat where I live, hydration is pretty much an absolute must. I know the Qur'an says that if fasting would bring extreme difficulty to you to not fast, but I can't even feed the homeless either!

 

Does anyone else have anything close to a problem like this, and if so, does anyone have any advice? Because I'm seriously considering not doing Ramadan anymore because of these things.

 

As-Salāmu `Alaykum,

 

If you break the fast, you will have to cover up later on. No need to feed the homeless if it is really very difficult for you to fast now.

 

Here is also a good read: http://www.gawaher.com/topic/739214-valid-excuses-for-not-fasting/

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For one job, I work outside in a nursery lot and loading area, so not only am I outside for 40+ hours a week, I'm on my feet helping customers and loading 25-70lb bags of rocks/dirt/mulch into people's vehicles. I also go play soccer, volleyball, softball, and go kayaking after or on my days off. The temperature has been hanging right around 100 degrees and 80% humidity. My fast is17 hours.

 

I don't mean to belittle your efforts, but just pray to Allah that he will help you through. Remember, do everything for the Glory of Allah and He will make it easier for us.

 

Do Ramadan brother, you can :)

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I don't know. I passed out a few days ago in front of Wal-Greens the first day I attempted fasting due to dehydration, and ended up breaking the fast to hydrate. Hydration is the biggest problem I'm having with Ramadan. I've already passed out once as it is, and in this heat I'm just asking to have someone call an ambulance on me.

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Okay, I'm going to list a bunch of things that can help with hydration. Ready, set, go:

  • Make sure that you're drinking a lot of water, juice, and milk. When I'm eating breakfast, I drink a glass of water between all the foods. I try to drink at least six glasses of water, two glasses of juice, and one glass of milk between iftar and suhoor.
  • Eat soup! I know it's hot, and soup doesn't sound all that appetizing, but it helps maintain hydration.
  • Drink a Gatorade if you have to, that will help replenish your body.
  • Eat salted pretzels. I know it sounds weird, but the mixture of carbohydrates and sodium will help keep you hydrated and energized. We used to do this at soccer tournaments and conditioning.
  • Fruits, fruits, and more fruits. Especially citrus. They not only will help keep your sugar and liquid levels up, but they contain many vitamins that will help your body cope with lower fluid levels.

Finally, try and keep cool. Bring a clean washcloth with you, and keep it wet. Place it on the back of your neck, wrists, or wipe it across your face. If it's wet, just wave it around for a few seconds and it will cool off, so it can cool you off too! Stay in the shade as much as you can. Wear loose clothing (I know I wear long skirts and a loose shirt), possibly a thobe. Cover your head with a lightweight cap (certain Sunnahs make sense for the heat!). Remember, the Prophet Muhammed (pbuh) and the Sahabah were fasting in intense heat and sun, for long days as well. They would eat dates and drink water. We have it much easier with our broad range of nutrition and rehydration tools! The more difficult it is, the more rewarding in the end :)

 

I don't want to sound preach-y, I know that can be annoying. Brother, I'm a convert as well. This is only my second Ramadan. I'm not someone with years of experience under my belt, so I know it can be hard. Trust in Allah, and do your best to glorify Him.

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Wait, salted pretzels? Doesn't salt dehydrate you?

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:sl:

Yes, keep away from salt, specially in sohour (the meal before fajr/dawn).

I suggest that you eat fruits and yugort only in suhour. Cooked and processed food make you thirsty, because of the high content of salt in them. Fruits and yugurt are 95% water, with almost no sodium content, and lots of potassium, which does the opposite action to your cells. They keep you hydrated much longer than other food can.

 

Hot weather is not among the excuses for not fasting. Millions of Muslims fast in countries like Iraq and Kuwait, where the temperature is around 122-131f (50-55c). To get a valid execuse, a Muslim doctor must check your condition, and if he/she says that fasting is harmful to your health, only then not fasting is valid for you. Otherwise you have to fast for 60 consecutive days, followed by the number of days you in which you intentionally broke your Ramadan fasting without a valid excuse.

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I am passing this Ramadan in another country (Qatar) out of my country, I work and in the meantime I have to come and cook for myself. I normally beak my fast with two cups of milk and dates and after praying Salat Maghrib I sip a cup of tea. After Salat Isha and Tarawih I got a small meal because, if I eat much I will feel hungry in morning and if I woke up for Sahor I only drink water. The first three days was hard, however later I got accustom to it. And knowing that no one know the rewarding of fast except Allah is a great support.

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:sl:

Otherwise you have to fast for 60 consecutive days, followed by the number of days you in which you intentionally broke your Ramadan fasting without a valid excuse.

 

Umm... what's the source for this? Is this in the Qur'an anywhere?

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:sl:

Millions of Muslims fast in countries like Iraq and Kuwait, where the temperature is around 122-131f (50-55c).

 

That's dry heat.

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Umm... what's the source for this? Is this in the Qur'an anywhere?

Its called kaffarah (expiation), as mentioned in hadith by Prophet Muhammad :s:

I've corrected my reply above. You have to fast for 60 consecutive days, followed by the number of days in which you intentionally broke your Ramadan fasting without a valid excuse. So if for example you did not fast for 3 days in ramadan, you have to fast for 63 consecutive days, without a break of even a single day in betwen, or else you have to do it allover again.

http://books.themajlis.net/node/179

http://www.myreligio...il.asp?Aid=5910

http://islamic-laws....tawzeh/162.html

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Its called kaffarah (expiation), as mentioned in hadith by Prophet Muhammad :s:

http://books.themajlis.net/node/179

http://www.myreligio...il.asp?Aid=5910

http://islamic-laws....tawzeh/162.html

 

You lost me the very second you said Hadith. I don't, nor will I ever, follow the Hadiths. They are not the word of Allah, and their sources are dubious at best.

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You lost me the very second you said Hadith. I don't, nor will I ever, follow the Hadiths. They are not the word of Allah, and their sources are dubious at best.

 

:sl:

 

Brother Ken, Hadiths are also authority of Islam.

 

Anyway, if there is a serious health issue, no need to fast now. But you will have to cover up (30 fasts) later on I mean when you are healthy.

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Wait, salted pretzels? Doesn't salt dehydrate you?

:sl:

Yes, keep away from salt, specially in sohour (the meal before fajr/dawn).

 

 

 

Salt doesn't dehydrate you. It helps replenish electrolytes that you sweat out during the day, and is actually important for rehydration. No, you shouldn't consume too much, especially for suhoor, but eating some for iftar wouldn't be a problem and actually beneficial.

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Just on the point that was mentioned earlier, the expiation for breaking the fast (60 days consec fasting) is only incumbent on the person who breaks it by having relations with their spouse, if the breaks it another way then while it is a major sin he and she have to replace that fast but no expiation is required.

 

If you doubt the sources of hadith then I suggest you Look up a man called Dr johnathan brown (or Dr jack Brown) he has written a book on it and there is a couple of youtube videos i suggest that you watch them as Allah says in the Quran "Obey Allah and obey the messenger" how can you obey and follow the orders of the prophet if you reject his statements.

 

lastly, we do need salt. As someone who trains and plays a lot football all coaches I have ever worked under tell us to replenish our salt levels after an intense session. This does not mean a lot of salt but like sister Amna said gatorade or powerade as we have in london has a balanced salt content there do help you avoid becoming dehydrated.

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