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the sad clown

Want To Learn The Arabic Alphabet?

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I would like to ask you one thing, "Do you know the Arabic Alphabet and its vowels?" If not I would like to show you something very basic as looking at it almost once only.

No, Arabic is a mystery to me.

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No, Arabic is a mystery to me.

 

What if I told you that I would be able to show you right here in this forum a basic lesson that will make you literate in Arabic within three days. Or even a more basic lesson that will make you understand how it all works (no more than two hours. Would you take up the challenge? It will be very beneficial to you.

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What if I told you that I would be able to show you right here in this forum a basic lesson that will make you literate in Arabic within three days. Or even a more basic lesson that will make you understand how it all works (no more than two hours. Would you take up the challenge? It will be very beneficial to you.

I would say OK, I would not mind seeing that. And two hours does not seem like too much.

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I would say OK, I would not mind seeing that. And two hours does not seem like too much.

 

Great! You could only be the wiser. And your status among Muslims as a seeker and sharer of knowledge will also be more highly respected. These are lessons I have devised about two months ago for a Mormon friend I met over another forum. This friend eventually turned out to be a great software designer living in the center of The United States. He has is in the process of putting the final touches of his search engine called http://www.scripturebrowser.com.

All religious text will be included and he did some new features to search that works better than Google.

 

Keep the following in mind. It is the overall statement that covers this lesson that will make you literate in the Arabic language in its unconnected form. The connected form is just a few steps from there. I have taught many to read and write Arabic in twenty four hours. That is a 95% + plus of any Arabic word. Remember reading and writing: not speaking.

 

The overall statement:

 

The Arabic language of the Qur'aan which is a detailed explanation of the Book (al-kitaab) consists of an alphabet of 28 letters (consonants) plus one special letter called alif; 3 short vowels written above or below the consonantal letters, which can be extended into 3 long vowels using the 3 universal letters alif (a), waaw (W), and yaa’ (Y); and two important diphthongs ay and aw. From here the entire structure of the language is build upon a well designed arrangement.

 

Here is the whole Arabic Alphabet (consonants). Just have a look at it. In the next post I will present thirteen letters that we shall examine more closely.

 

Remember to read from right to left.

 

Arabic%20Alphabet1.png

 

To be continued inshaa allaah (if God had willed).

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I would say OK, I would not mind seeing that. And two hours does not seem like too much.

 

I will rephrase what I said in the post #32 for familiarity.

 

 

Below is the complete alphabet. If you know this alphabet its three short vowels and three long vowels and two diphthongs and less than another ten points then you would be able to read and write 99% plus of every word in the Arabic language and that's including the Qur'aan. That is reading it in the unconnected form. It will take a few more steps to learn how to read and write it in its connected form. I have taught many people how to read and write Arabic in just one day. It is that simple. It will make entering the Book much easier as well as read the Torah. To start off I have chosen some letters with their English equivalents. We will concentrate on these first. You will see how easy it is.

 

Arabic%20Alphabet1.png

 

Carefully observe the following chosen Arabic letters with their English equivalents.We are going to use them to explain the language of the Qur'aan. Very simple. Just as simple as seeing it with your eyes.

 

Remember to say only the sounds of the letters and not their names. Say L and not EL. The name of L in Arabic is LaaM and in Hebrew it is LaaMed. Just say the sound L or LLL.

 

Arabic%20Alphabet2.png

 

In the next post I will present to you even fewer letters for our complete examination. Once you know them you can apply the rules to the rest of the letters. There is 100% consistency. Nothing like in English.

Try and memorize those thirteen letters. Also write them the way you think they should be written but remember go from right to left.

 

Hope to hear from you before I continue to the next step inshaa allaah.

Edited by al-amiyr

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Thank you for this. I will practice this and await the next lesson.

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Thank you for this. I will practice this and await the next lesson.

 

Remember the selected consonantal letters chosen from the Arabic Alphabet in post# 5. I present them again here below:

 

Arabic%20Alphabet2.png

 

Arabic like Hebrew does not have special letters representing the vowels like in English (a-e-i-o-u). There is no agreement as to how many vowel sounds there are in the English language.They range from 10 to 16 to 20 to possibly 30. The mentioned vowel letters (a-e-i-o-u) and sometimes (y-w) are also used to back up vowel signs. Arabic has exactly three vowel sounds that are represented by exactly three vowel representations (check below).

 

Arabic also does not have the problem of sound-letter correspondence. Arabic has a one to one perfect correspondence between the uttered sound and the written letter. It has been like that since the day the Qur'aan was written 1400 years ago.The Qur'aan has kept the sounds of the language intact from going astray since that time. English on the other hand has over 50 consonants and have only 21 consonantal letters to represent them.

 

Also there are no digraphic (a pair of letters representing a single speech sound, such as sh in the word ship) symbols in the Arabic language.

Also there are no silent letters in Arabic, such as k in the word know and also no non existent letters that must be pronounced..

 

The Arabic orthography is a masterful invention and is friendly to humanity and its environment on every level. For example perfect literacy could be achieved by making a pencil only once sharp and before it has become blunt;Lo! and Behold! you can read and write in Arabic including the Qur'aan.One tree can make a thousand persons literate in the language of the Qur'aan but a thousand trees would not be enough to make one literate in Chinese.All other languages for literate proficiency lie somewhere in between these two. Think about the environment and time.

 

Let us continue and see how the three vowels are used with the consonants.

Here are five selected Arabic consonants with their English equivalents.Please learn these because they are going to be needed for our basic lesson. If you feel that we can tackle the thirteen above letters then that will be even better. Let me know about this.

 

Ar.Alph.003.png

 

The Arabic vowels

As I have said before that there are only 3 short vowels written above or below the consonantal letters.

Here below are the three vowel representations. Look how simple they are! Its simplicity is almost unbelievable.

 

 

Ar.Alph.004.png

 

 

To be continued later... in shaa'a allaah [if ALLAAH had willed].

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Hi the sad clown

 

Are you still on track?

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This section continued from post # 5

Step by step easy and quickest entry into the book (al-kitaab).

 

 

 

The Arabic vowels

As I have said before that there are only 3 short vowels written above or below the consonantal letters.

Let us see the examples of our first vowel as explained in the below chart from post# 5

 

Ar.Alph.004.V.01.png

 

Here are the examples of how Arabic consonants relate to Arabic vowels. Observe it well. They are as easy as looking at it once only.

 

 

Example One the letter L which is called Laam in Arabic.

 

Ar.Eng.L.png

 

Can you see how the vowels are written either above or below the consonantal letters to produce from the L la li lu.

 

To be continued inshaa allaah... if God had willed (the time).

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Hi the sad clown

 

Are you still on track?

No, I was not able to be here for the past few days because I was selected to serve on a jury. I will have to come back to this again. Perhaps this weekend.

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No, I was not able to be here for the past few days because I was selected to serve on a jury. I will have to come back to this again. Perhaps this weekend.

 

100% the sad clown. You are quite busy. I will be here to fit into your program inshaa allaah.

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