Jump to content
Islamic Forum
Saracen21stC

China Bans Ramadan Fasting In Muslim Province

Recommended Posts

China bans Ramadan fasting in Muslim province

 

 

Students and civil servants in the northwestern Xinjiang province have been ordered to not observe traditional fasting.
 
Last updated: 03 Jul 2014 09:11
 
 

20147381151360734_20.jpg

 

Chinese Muslims gather to break their fast during Ramadan at the Niujie Masjid in Beijing [AP]

Students and civil servants in China's Muslim northwest have been ordered by the state to avoid taking part in traditional fasting during the Islamic month of Ramadan.

 

Statements posted in the past week on websites of schools, government agencies and local party organisations in the Xinjiang region said the ban would protect students' wellbeing and prevent the use of schools and government offices to promote religion, the AP news agency reported on Thursday.

 

Statements on the websites of local party organisations said members of the officially atheist ruling party should also avoid fasting, although the month of Ramadan, which began at sundown on June 28, is observed by Muslims. 

 

"No teacher can participate in religious activities, instill religious thoughts in students or coerce students into religious activities," said a statement on the website of the "Number 3 Grade School" in Ruoqiang County in Xinjiang.
 
 
The news agency reported that cities in Xinjiang had set up news portals saying that fasting was detrimental to the physical wellbeing of young students, and also have called in retired teachers to stand guard at Masjids in order to prevent students from entering.
 
Similar bans have been imposed on fasting in the past. This year's ban was unusually sensitive because Xinjiang is under tight security following a number of attacks that the government blames on Muslim rebels who allegedly have ties with foreign armed groups.
 
On Tuesday, authorities in some communities in Xinjiang held celebrations of the anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party and served food to test whether Muslim guests were fasting, according to Dilxat Raxit, spokesman in Germany for the rights group World Uyghur Congress.
 
"This will lead to more conflicts if China uses coercive measures to rule and to challenge Uyghur beliefs," Dilxat Raxit told AP.
Violence has escalated in recent years in Xinjiang. The ruling party blames rebels who it says wants independence, while members of the region's Uyghur ethnic group complain that discrimination and restrictions on religion, such as a ban on taking children to Masjids, fuels anger at the ethnic Han Chinese majority.
 
Wary of religious activities
 
An attack on May 22 in the regional capital of Urumqi by four people who threw bombs in a vegetable market killed 43 people, including the attackers.
 
On June 22, police in Kashgar in the far west said they killed 13 attackers who drove into a police building and set off explosives, injuring three officers. Authorities have blamed two other attacks at train stations in Urumqi and in China's southwest on Muslim rebels.
 
The government responded with a crackdown that resulted in more than 380 arrests in one month and public rallies to announce sentences.
According to AP, the ruling party is wary of religious activities which it worries might serve as a rallying point for opposition to one-party rule. Controls on worship are especially sensitive in Xinjiang and in neighbouring Tibet, where religious faith plays a large role in the local cultures.
 
Source:
Associated Press
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PropellerAds

China Bans Ramadan Fast in Muslim Northwest

 

BEIJING — Jul 2, 2014, 6:38 AM ET
By DIDI TANG Associated Press
 
 
 
AP_logo_update_20130709.gif

 

 
Students and civil servants in China's Muslim northwest, where Beijing is enforcing a security crackdown following deadly unrest, have been ordered to avoid taking part in traditional fasting during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.
 
Statements posted in the past several days on websites of schools, government agencies and local party organizations in the Xinjiang region said the ban was aimed at protecting students' wellbeing and preventing use of schools and government offices to promote religion. Statements on the websites of local party organizations said members of the officially atheist ruling party also should avoid fasting.
 
"No teacher can participate in religious activities, instill religious thoughts in students or coerce students into religious activities," said a statement on the website of the No. 3 Grade School in Ruoqiang County in Xinjiang.
 
Similar bans have been imposed in the past on fasting for Ramadan, which began at sundown Saturday. But this year is unusually sensitive because Xinjiang is under tight security following attacks that the government blames on Muslim extremists with foreign terrorist ties.
 
Violence has escalated in recent years in Xinjiang. The ruling party blames violent extremists that it says want independence, while members of the region's Uighur ethnic group complain that discrimination and restrictions on religion, such as a ban on taking children to Masjids, are fueling anger at the ethnic Han Chinese majority.
 
An attack on May 22 in the regional capital of Urumqi by four people who threw bombs in a vegetable market killed 43 people, including the attackers. On June 22, police in Kashgar in the far west said they killed 13 assailants who drove into a police building and set off explosives, injuring three officers. Authorities have blamed two other attacks at train stations in Urumqi and in China's southwest on Muslim extremists.
 
The government responded with a crackdown that resulted in more than 380 arrests in one month and public rallies to announce sentences.
 
The ruling party is wary of religious activities it worries might serve as a rallying point for opposition to one-party rule. Controls on worship are especially sensitive in Xinjiang and in neighboring Tibet, where religious faith plays a large role in local cultures.
 
On Tuesday, authorities in some communities in Xinjiang held celebrations of the anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party and served food to test whether Muslim guests were fasting, according to Dilxat Raxit, spokesman in Germany for the rights group World Uyghur Congress.
 
"This will lead to more conflicts if China uses coercive measures to rule and to challenge Uighur beliefs," said Dilxat Raxit in an email.
 
The ruling party says religion and education should be kept separate and students should not be subject to religious influences. That rule is rarely enforced for children of Han Chinese, who, if they have a religion, are mostly Buddhist, Daoist or Christian.
 
"Students shall not participate in religious activities; they shall not study scripts or read poems at script and choir classes; they shall not wear any religious emblems; and no parent or others can force students to have religious beliefs or partake in religious activities," said the statement on the website of the grade school in Ruoqiang County.
 
A news portal run by the government of Yili in the northern reaches of Xinjiang said fasting is detrimental to the physical wellbeing of young students, who should eat regularly.
 
In the city of Bole, retired teachers from the Wutubulage Middle School were called in to stand guard at Masjids and prevent students from entering, according to a statement on the municipal party committee website.
 
Also in Bole, the Bozhou University of Radio and Television said on its website it held a meeting with working and retired minority teachers on the first day of the Ramadan to remind them of the fasting ban.
 
The forestry bureau in Xinjiang's Zhaosu county held an event the day before Ramadan at which party cadres signed a pledge they and their relatives would "firmly resist fasting," according to a statement on the website of the local party committee.
 
The Moyu Weather Bureau in the Hotan area said on its website that Muslim employees, both active and retired, were required to sign a letter promising not to fast.
 
The commercial bureau for Turpan, an oasis town in the Taklamakan Desert, said in a statement that civil servants are "strictly forbidden" to fast or perform the Salat prayer ritual in a Masjid.

 

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/china-bans-ramadan-fast-muslim-northwest-24393290?singlePage=true

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Assalamo alaikum

 

Subhan Allah, those kuffar come up with all sorts of bans against religions. They are fighting Allah, yet, instead of being destroyed by the Lord Al-Mighty, they thrive and prosper, and become a leader in world economic super powers, second only to the USA!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well , what brought about the bans on Ramadan  ? Bombings , and a few machete slaughters . China reacts to these  incidents . We have our plans , and God has His ....and in His own Time and in His own ways .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Chinese Uighurs defy Ramadan ban


The government's attempt to clamp down on religious expression has backfired among Uyghurs.


Umar Farooq Last updated: 05 Jul 2014 13:05
    

Kashgar, China - Chinese authorities have imposed restrictions on Uighur Muslims during the month of Ramadan, banning government employees and school children from fasting, in what rights groups say has become an annual attempt at systematically erasing the region's Islamic identity.

Chinese authorities have justified the ban on fasting by saying it is meant to protect the health of students, and restrictions on religious practices by government officials are meant to ensure the state does not support any particular faith.

Yet in Kashgar, in Xinjiang province, China's westernmost city, close to the border with Tajikstan and Kyrgyztan, Uighur Muslims say the restrictions have backfired. Not only have locals become more observant of Islamic practices, but many have found ways to flaunt Chinese laws restricting everything from who may attend the Masjid, to which copies of the Quran are read.

They want to cut our children off from Islam. We are not allowed to teach them the Quran, but we do, at home - secretly.

- Ghulam Abbas, a local Uighur


"That is Mao ZeDong," said Omar, a taxi driver, pointing to a 24m-tall statue of the founder of the People's Republic of China, as he navigates his taxi through traffic across People's Square. "He brought all the Chinese here," he added, out of earshot of the soldiers lining up across the street.

A few minutes later, the soldiers pile into trucks and move to the city's commercial centre down the road, where police frisk shoppers at the entrance to a shopping mall. Across Kashgar, security forces have been deployed to thwart potential attacks by Uighur militants seeking to wrestle control of Xinjiang province from Beijing.

Home to some of China's largest deposits of oil, natural gas, and coal, Xinjiang has a majority Muslim Uighur population - a Turkic ethnic group with a language and culture closer to Central Asia. Before the region was absorbed into the People's Republic of China in 1949, almost everyone here was Uighur, but the numbers have have since declined, dropping to below half by the year 2000, as tens of millions of Han Chinese - the majority population of mainland China - were encouraged to settle here by the government.

That demographic shift, which accelerated in the 1990s as Beijing began to develop Xinjiang, combined with Chinese laws restricting Islamic practices by Uighurs and the 1997 execution of 30 Uighur separatists by Chinese authorities, triggered a wave of violence by militants that has left hundreds of people dead, mostly civilians.

Last month, a suicide bomber killed 39 people in the provincial capitol of Urumqi, and police claimed to have killed 13 men who attempted to ram an explosives-laden vehicle into their office near Kashgar.

The deadly violence - including an attack by knife-wielding men at a train station in Kuming that killed 29 in March - has sparked a massive crackdown by Beijing, with authorities announcing the convictions of more than 400 people across Xinjiang. Last Wednesday, Kashgar authorities announced 113 people had been sentenced for crimes, including supporting terrorism and inciting ethnic hatred and ethnic discrimination.

"The government says every Uighur, if they have a beard or wear a hijab, they are a terrorist," said Abdul Majid, who owns a mobile phone shop near People's Square. He says the last time tensions were this high was in 2009, after 184 people died in clashes between Uighurs and Han Chinese in Urumqi.

'All these problems started after September 11'

A world away from Kashgar's commercial centre lies the city's heart: a nearly 2,000-year-old Uighur quarter that is currently being rebuilt, literally brick by brick, by mostly Han Chinese migrant workers. Kashgar's ancient Masjids are being restored and the homes in the old city re-imagined with hints of Central Asian architecture and with help from the Chinese government. It's part of a programme that authorities say is aimed at making the area earthquake-resistant.   
      ]

But not everyone is happy about the renovations.

"If Allah wants to kill us, he will send an earthquake, and he will kill us," said Hajji Abdul Razzak, a silk merchant who has chosen not to have his home in the old city rebuilt. "A lot of people have left, and just put their houses out to rent."

Around the corner from Kashgar's 572-year-old Id Kah Masjid, a large notice board implores Uighurs to adopt modern attire. One half of the board is covered in pictures depicting traditional Uighurs, women in colourful dresses and flowing hair and clean-shaven men. The other half shows rows of men with beards and women in headscarves or face-covering veils, all with a red X over them.

"All these problems started after September 11th," said Abdul Razzak. "The Pakistan border [with China] was completely sealed, and when it opened a few years later, these Uighurs from Pakistan and Afghanistan came. They are doing all these [bombings], but we are being oppressed."

Restrictions ignored

Yet, Abdul Razzak and other Uighurs said the attempt to clamp down on religious expression has backfired in Kashgar, with more and more locals flaunting the restrictions.

Nearly every business in Kashgar's old city is closed during the hottest part of the afternoon when Al Jazeera visited this week during Ramadan.

In the evening, throngs of young women in headscarves or full face veils pass signs posted at Kashgar's main hospital reminding them veiled women cannot enter.

Along with government employees, children under the age of 18 are barred from attending Masjids, yet dozens of men attending night prayers at one of Kashgar's medieval Masjids have brought along their children. Toddlers line up next to the adults, imitating their movements during prayers.

"Sure, it's against the law to bring kids to the masjid [mosque], but we do it anyway," said Ghulam Abbas, a middle-aged Uighur man who makes a living selling fried fish on the main boulevard in the old city.

He added that, for centuries, parents sent their children to maktaps, part-time schools at the Masjid, where they memorised the Quran - but this practise, along with most organised religious instruction, is now prohibited in Xinjiang.
Dozens of men attending night prayers bring their children   [umar Farooq/Al Jazeera]

Asked if Uighurs are forgetting how to recite the Quran as a result, Abbas called his eight-year-old son over and, after some coaxing, convinced him to recite a chapter from memory. "They want to cut our children off from Islam," Abbas said. "We are not allowed to teach them the Quran, but we do, at home - secretly."

It is not the only restriction that is being ignored by the Uighurs in Kashgar.

"The Chinese don't want us to have kids, but we just pay fines or bribe people," says Abdul Razzak, who has five children - three more than allowed by law. His three extra children, two sons and a daughter, have cost him around 60,000 yuan ($9,670) in fines. He said he is worried they will forget how to speak Uighur.

Other restrictions - like the ban on fasting for schoolchildren - are more difficult to get around. Chinese authorities require that school teachers, who are barred from fasting themselves, also discourage students.

"It depends on the teachers," said Mehmet, a high-school student in Kashgar. "[some] bring water, bread, candy, put it in front of you, and you have to eat."

Meanwhile, certain styles of headscarf are still not acceptable to authorities. "The abaya was very popular here, starting four or five years ago," said Abdul Majid, a 20-something Uighur who imports women's clothes from Turkey. "But last year, police started bothering women, so now, I can't find anyone who wants to buy them."

Under Chinese law, only state-approved copies of Islamic literature like the Quran are allowed. "If they catch you with a different version, a different translation, or a book from Saudi Arabia or Pakistan, you go to jail," explained the owner of a small bookstore across the street form the Id Kah Masjid, who asked not to be named.

 

Source: http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2014/07/chinese-uyghurs-defy-ramadan-ban-20147471125107552.html
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By happy spirit
      The history of the messengers: Moses
      The killing of the sons of Mosesnation
      The children of Israel carefully considered what had been said among themselves, generation after another, about Prophet Abraham (pbuh): that from his descendants there would emerge a boy who would cause the fall of the king of Egypt. This news was so well-known among the children of Israel that it reached the Pharaoh, after being mentioned to him by some of his princes. As a result and a precautionary measure, Pharaoh ordered that the sons of the children of Israel be killed to prevent such a boy from ever existing. Under the rule of Pharaoh, the children of Israel lived in oppression and injustice. {Verily, Fir’aun (Pharaoh) exalted himself in the land and made its people sects, weakening (oppressing) a group (i.e. Children of Israel) among them, killing their sons, and letting their females live. Verily, he was of the Mufsidûn (i.e. those who commit great sins and crimes, oppressors, tyrants, etc.).{ (Al-Qasas:4)
      Allah wanted to bless the besieged children of Israel. 5. And We wished to do a favour to those who were weak (and oppressed) in the land, and to make them rulers and to make them the inheritors, 6. And to establish them in the land, and We let Fir’aun (Pharaoh) and Hâmân and their hosts receive from them that which they feared.(Al-Qasas:5-6)
      The story of his birth and upbringing
      Pharaoh was extremely careful in ensuring that Moses would not be born, to the extent that he ordered his minions and midwives to circulate and ask pregnant women about their due dates; so the moment a male was born, he was immediately slaughtered by his butchers. However Allah wanted to show Pharaoh, Haman and their soldiers that which they feared, and when the mother of Moses gave birth to him, she knew she had to dispose of him or he would be slaughtered. {And We inspired the mother of Mûsa (Moses), (saying): “Suckle him [Mûsa (Moses)], but when you fear for him, then cast him into the river and fear not, nor grieve. Verily! We shall bring him back to you, and shall make him one of (Our) Messengers.”}(Al-Qasas:7)
       
      https://www.path-2-happiness.com/en/the-path-to-happiness-messengers-and-prophets-the-history-of-the-messengers-moses
    • By happy spirit
      What is happiness?
      What, then, is this happiness, and how does one achieve happiness?!
      Happiness is the constant feeling of elation, tranquility, generosity and joy. This feeling of contentment comes as a result of always having three states: one’s self being in a good state, one’s life being good, and expecting that one’s final abode will be good.
      With regards to these three states, man starts by asking questions about the self. These questions grow larger as he grows older, and he does not find happiness until he answers the questions which come to his mind:
      • Who owns this universe and controls all its affairs?
      • Who created me and created this universe around me?
      • Who am I? Where do I come from? Why was I created?
      Where will my destiny take me?
      https://www.path-2-happiness.com/en/all-people-are-looking-for-happiness-so-where-is-the-path
    • By SadiqIbnUmar
      Al-salamu alaikom wa rahmatu Allah wa barakatuh,
      Myself: I am a simple man just enjoying the gifts of Allah (SWT). Alhamdulillah, I spent so many years in darkness and I now am able to live in the light and truth of Allah (SWT). I am on a journey to strengthen my deen. 
      Fi aman Allah
      Sadiq
    • By dot
      If he's good enough for you, he's good enough for me.. he scores another few, I'll be Muslim too..
      If he's good enough for you, he's good enough for me.. he's sitting in the mosque, that's where I wanna be.
       
×